Questions For The World

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Quixotess
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:20 am UTC

crowey wrote:To people in the US, do you think brits do really bloody love the queen?(1) Similarly, bad teeth?(2) Terribly terribly polite?(3)

1. No. I do have the impression that your tabloids get quite obsessed with the younger royalty, but I am aware that tabloids are not representative of the population. Although I do have fantasies where your royalty goes to war with Parliament, wins, and reestablishes the feudal system.
2. Yes. And crooked counts as bad.
3. Not polite so much as somewhat more reserved, somewhat less ready to make friends or call new acquaintances/coworkers by first names.

To anyone not in the US: How closely are you following our presidential election? Why? What if anything will it mean for you? (And please include where you are, of course.)

To Australians: Please explain the meaning, proper usage, and origins of the expression "Blow that for a game of soldiers."
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby |Erasmus| » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:25 am UTC

Quixotess wrote:
crowey wrote:To people in the US, do you think brits do really bloody love the queen?(1) Similarly, bad teeth?(2) Terribly terribly polite?(3)

1. No. I do have the impression that your tabloids get quite obsessed with the younger royalty, but I am aware that tabloids are not representative of the population. Although I do have fantasies where your royalty goes to war with Parliament, wins, and reestablishes the feudal system.
2. Yes. And crooked counts as bad.
3. Not polite so much as somewhat more reserved, somewhat less ready to make friends or call new acquaintances/coworkers by first names.

To anyone not in the US: How closely are you following our presidential election? Why? What if anything will it mean for you? (And please include where you are, of course.)

To Australians: Please explain the meaning, proper usage, and origins of the expression "Blow that for a game of soldiers."



Don't know about the brits, but I hear the Japanese are an incredibly polite bunch of people.

I am not 'following' your elections, but I do pay some attention when it makes the news over here, and I really hope Obama wins, because he seems to be the candidate that isn't a total douche. It would be novel for you guys to have a president that the rest of the world has a relatively hard time making fun of.

I have never, in my life, heard that phrase before. I doubt it is the stereotypical australian thing you make it out to be.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby cypherspace » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:32 am UTC

Quixotess wrote:To Australians: Please explain the meaning, proper usage, and origins of the expression "Blow that for a game of soldiers."

It's a British expression as far as I know. "blow" can usually be replaced with stuff or bugger. If something is evidently ridiculous and asking way too much of the person tasked with it, then you give up with "Stuff that for a lark" or "Bugger that for a game of soldiers."

I don't know the origin of it, but I imagine it's from the First World War. I've heard it remarked that the fighting men thought the generals were "playing at soldiers", and I guess it expressed the frustration of someone given an illogical and impossible task.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby LE4dGOLEM » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:33 am UTC

Quixotess wrote:To anyone not in the US: How closely are you following our presidential election? Why? What if anything will it mean for you? (And please include where you are, of course.)


I'm a brit-lander, and am not following it due to lack if interest. What it will mean for me is who/what force is in charge of a rather large and fairly "friendly" country.

Regarding oz: I've heard it before, and pretty much means "that was meant to be entertaining but in fact... fuck that shit", generally in a "soldiers" sort of thing but fairly often not as well.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:34 am UTC

|Erasmus| wrote:I have never, in my life, heard that phrase before. I doubt it is the stereotypical australian thing you make it out to be.

Not stereotyping. Just heard an Australian say it and was wondering if others knew it.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Izawwlgood » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:36 am UTC

To anyone under the age of 20 (edit: make it 30!): Do you feel like our role in the world at large is a futile/pointless one?
Last edited by Izawwlgood on Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:40 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby crowey » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:37 am UTC

Quixotess wrote:To anyone not in the US: How closely are you following our presidential election? Why? What if anything will it mean for you? (And please include where you are, of course.)

To Australians: Please explain the meaning, proper usage, and origins of the expression "Blow that for a game of soldiers."


I'm following it in as far as whatever is on the evening news (the primaries, latest goofs, who the VP candidates are etc). why? it's quite important to us all, given the power that the US wields, also US social events seem to predict trends in the UK, levels of conservatism especially things like religion, evolution, human rights and equality laws. I want Obama to win, he seems alright.

"Blow that for a game of soldiers" and varients thereof is more British than Aussie. Not sure on the origins, google says: this.


To everyone, what do you think other nation's stereotypes of your country are, and do you think they are anywhere near close?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby LE4dGOLEM » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:38 am UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:To anyone under the age of 20: Do you feel like our role in the world at large is a futile/pointless one?

"Our" inclusive or exclusive?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Izawwlgood » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:39 am UTC

Well, I'm 24, but I'm curious how those a bit younger then me feel. You know, edited to under the age of 30.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:41 am UTC

KingLoser wrote:
|Erasmus| wrote:
Alpha Omicron wrote:American Guide to Celsius:
(According to Southwestern Ontario weather)

>30 - Too hot
30 - Hot
20 - Warm
10 - Nice
0 - Cool
-10 - Chilly
-20 - Cold
-30 - Too cold.


Australian Guide (for most people):

>30 - Too Hot
30 - Warm
20 - Nice
10 - Cold
<0 - Too Cold


Irish Guide:
30 - Wha?
20 - Too Hot
10 - Warm
0 - T-Shirt Weather
-10 - Fuckin disraaaaaaaaceful!

Northern English Guide (The south is a bit hotter generally, Scotland is colder)
>30 - Hasn't ever happened.
30 - Ridiculously hot
20 - All men must lose shirts and carry pint/open can at all times.
16 - Summer.
10 - Nice
0 - Cold
-10 - Wear a scarf & gloves (Exemption for Geordies who'll only wear a coat if theres an actual chance of death without one)
-20 - Probably hasn't happened/Old people will probably die.

Its also worth pointing out that only people over thirty generally use Farenheit, but only for higher temperatures to make them sound more surprising. Christ knows how you're supposed to work that system.
Also, all imperial systems are referred to as "Old money" usually with the question "whats that in old money?".

Weight:
Spoiler:
If you're discussing body weight then you use stones & pounds, although use of kilos seems to be increasing. Most people know a kilo is a bag of sugar and have a better idea idea of how much a pound is. No-one will have the first clue about how much you mean if you exclusively use pounds, you'll just get to watch them divide it by 14 in their heads.


Distance: This is a little bit complicated so bear with me.
Spoiler:
Long distances are measured in miles. If its less than a mile metres and yards can be used interchangably. If a distance is 10 foot (almost always foot instead of feet) or less then you use feet, if more then change to yards/metres and 6 foot/two metres are used interchangably even though they're not really the same. If something is less than 2 foot: use centimetres. If its a less than one foot: use inches when discussing rough distances or centimetres & millimetres if you have to be precise. If you speak to a trades person then you use never use centimetres, only millimetres. Never use the fractions of an inch. Ever.


Does anywhere else in the world have Vimto?

Crowey: There are studies showing the UK to be one of the top 5 politest nations in the world. We're usually pipped by Japan though.

Oh we avoid giving out or using first names like the plague. Its just too familiar, names are usually given at the end of a conversation unless you're trying to pull :D
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby crowey » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:52 am UTC

ishikiri wrote:Distance: This is a little bit complicated so bear with me.
Spoiler:
Long distances are measured in miles. If its less than a mile metres and yards can be used interchangably. If a distance is 10 foot (almost always foot instead of feet) or less then you use feet, if more then change to yards/metres and 6 foot/two metres are used interchangably even though they're not really the same. If something is less than 2 foot: use centimetres. If its a less than one foot: use inches when discussing rough distances or centimetres & millimetres if you have to be precise. If you speak to a trades person then you use never use centimetres, only millimetres. Never use the fractions of an inch. Ever.


Oh we avoid giving out or using first names like the plague. Its just too familiar, names are usually given at the end of a conversation unless you're trying to pull :D


Oh god the distances thing is the truest way of describing it. And most of my friends call me by my last name (only because it's a good 'un, not for politeness).

in the (far) south:

>30- very hot.
30-the hot end of comfortable
20- the cold end of comfortable (between here and 30 there is exponential growth of lobster people and topless men drinking lager/cider)
10-a bit chilly, consider swapping flipflops to real shoes.
0-fecking cold, wear at least 3 jumpers and a coat
-10- wuh? Are we in the freezer aisle?
-20- are you joking? Death.


To Australians: Are you really wary of the wildlife, or do you get used to the fact that everything is deadly?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:59 am UTC

Oh the names thing is only for strangers. Unless they're family, my mum Pre-warned me yesterday that when I get a call about a job from her cousin that they're all exceptionally famaliar - even though I haven't met most of them since I was a foot long - All "our-Ben" this and that,
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby |Erasmus| » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:04 am UTC

crowey wrote:To Australians: Are you really wary of the wildlife, or do you get used to the fact that everything is deadly?


Doesn't really bother me, although I don't generally deal with it alot, living in Sydney.

We do still have a bunch of spiders running around that can quite easily kill you, but I don't really think about it much. I am a little wary when rummaging around in the garage/shed due to redbacks hiding in there regularly, but that's about it.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:04 am UTC

Yeah, see, because here it's pretty much a first name basis with almost anyone, right off the bat. The major exceptions are that children address teachers as "Mr/Ms/Miss/Mrs Lastname" and if you're talking to your friend's parents you're probably going to do the same, until they're, like, in-laws. Oh, and other major authority figues such as doctors and cops, in a professional setting. But strangers, co-workers, bosses, friends--all first names.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby electronic mily » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:11 am UTC

I'll ramble a bit to sum up what I can respond to: I'm American. Most people I know live in two story houses, maybe half with garages. A few have pools, but mainly the sort of flimsy above-ground types. Of course, we're out in rural nowhere, so apartments and the like aren't really an option. Most people I know have dishwashers, so I'm not really sure about the running water thing. As for shoes, I take mine off in the house, but my parents don't. However: I also take my shoes off outside my house pretty often, and sometimes inside other people's houses as long as I know them pretty well.

As for "our" part in the world, I'm not sure I understand the question. Who exactly are "we?"

Here's my question. Now, in America, we mostly laugh at each other's regional accents in a "haha, you talk different" kind of way. We think British accents sound cool. We think Australian accents sound cool. We think Scottish, Irish, and basically all other English-speaking accents sound cool. The question - does anyone actually think American accents sound cool?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby sje46 » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:20 am UTC

electronic mily wrote:I'll ramble a bit to sum up what I can respond to: I'm American. Most people I know live in two story houses, maybe half with garages. A few have pools, but mainly the sort of flimsy above-ground types. Of course, we're out in rural nowhere, so apartments and the like aren't really an option. Most people I know have dishwashers, so I'm not really sure about the running water thing. As for shoes, I take mine off in the house, but my parents don't. However: I also take my shoes off outside my house pretty often, and sometimes inside other people's houses as long as I know them pretty well.

As for "our" part in the world, I'm not sure I understand the question. Who exactly are "we?"

Here's my question. Now, in America, we mostly laugh at each other's regional accents in a "haha, you talk different" kind of way. We think British accents sound cool. We think Australian accents sound cool. We think Scottish, Irish, and basically all other English-speaking accents sound cool. The question - does anyone actually think American accents sound cool?

That's what my area is like to.

I like the Boston accent, kinda. But I live here, so whaterver.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:24 am UTC

Keep in mind that the above experiences ^^ are skewed rich, although more people do live in houses here than do in England, I think. Except in NYC and LA.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:39 am UTC

sje46 wrote:I like the Boston accent, kinda. But I live here, so whaterver.

Does the Boston accent actually sound like Matt Damon in Good Willing Hunting? Cos I do like that accent.

American accents don't sound cool when you hear them on TV but on-on-one they are. Mainly because they're something different.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby sje46 » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:48 am UTC

ishikiri wrote:
sje46 wrote:I like the Boston accent, kinda. But I live here, so whaterver.

Does the Boston accent actually sound like Matt Damon in Good Willing Hunting? Cos I do like that accent.

American accents don't sound cool when you hear them on TV but on-on-one they are. Mainly because they're something different.

OF course. Matt Damon is from Boston.

A good place to hear it, though, is The Departed.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:57 am UTC

I must check that out.

I always thought Matt Damon was from New Jersey (Joisey?) due to the Kevin Smith/Ben Affleck connections.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby sje46 » Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:14 am UTC

ishikiri wrote:I must check that out.

I always thought Matt Damon was from New Jersey (Joisey?) due to the Kevin Smith/Ben Affleck connections.

Nope. I can see how you would think that though.

He was born and raised in Cambridge, MA, and was a childhood friend of Ben's. Affleck is from Boston as well.

Kevin Smith is def from Jersey.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:23 am UTC

Hmmm how close is Garden State on the accent thing?

This whole Damon/Affleck thing has thrown me all outta whack.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby sje46 » Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:29 am UTC

ishikiri wrote:Hmmm how close is Garden State on the accent thing?

This whole Damon/Affleck thing has thrown me all outta whack.
I really don't know.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby KingLoser » Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:41 am UTC

electronic mily wrote:Here's my question. Now, in America, we mostly laugh at each other's regional accents in a "haha, you talk different" kind of way. We think British accents sound cool. We think Australian accents sound cool. We think Scottish, Irish, and basically all other English-speaking accents sound cool. The question - does anyone actually think American accents sound cool?

Not really... it can sound cool on girls.

Then again, I make fun of peoples accents who live 10 minutes down the road... and mine is the funniest of all.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Vox Imperatoris » Sun Aug 24, 2008 4:31 am UTC

To those of you who aren't familar the Fahrenheit system, I'll do a chart for Alabama (a very hot and humid place):

>100-Extremely hot, old people might die. You don't want to be outside. Rarely happens in the summer for more than a very short time.
90-Very Hot. You still probably don't want to be outside. Common in the summer.
80-Hot. Bearable, but not comfortable for me. This is the default temperature range in the summer.
70-Good. Upper seventies is warm, and lower seventies is what most people set their air conditioners to. Default spring/fall temperature.
60-Cool. Still fine, but lower sixties gets a bit chilly.
50-Chilly. You probably want a coat, or at least more than a T-shirt. This only happens in the winter.
40-Cold. You definitely want a coat. This happens for short periods of time in the winter.
30-Freezing. 32 is the freezing point. Basically, barring a snowstorm, you're only going to encounter this at night in mid-winter. It has snowed here enough to cover the ground approximately 3 times in 15 years. (Although there was a big blizzard the year after I was born. Our weather is weird.)
20-Very Cold. Does not happen.
10-Extremely Cold. Are you joking?
<0-Canada Temperature. 0 is about -18 Celsius.

ETA: Nobody thinks Southern accents are cool. :D Luckily I don't have much of one.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Mr. Beck » Sun Aug 24, 2008 4:32 am UTC

For Albuquerque, NM:

40: A hot day.
30: Normal 6 months of the year.
20: People may begin to wear long-sleeve shirts. Students claim classroom is chilly.
10: Half the population is wearing a ski jacket. The other is in t-shirts so as not too look "wimpy".
0: If there is any moisture about, schools close. Hobos die.
-10: News story of the season. City pretty much shuts down.
-20: There are no survivors.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby telcontar42 » Sun Aug 24, 2008 4:47 am UTC

So are political issues like gay marriage, abortion, and teaching evolution/creationism in schools significant issues in other countries or is they just the result of the religious fundamentalism in the US?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Sun Aug 24, 2008 4:58 am UTC

In Canada, there's a bit of the gay marriage/abortion/creationism thing going on, mostly in Alberta I think. (We like to think of Alberta as Canada's Texas. Oil money, pickup trucks, and all the righteous-making politicians that go with them. :roll: )

Most city people across Canada are fine with gay marriage and abortion, and don't want to get any creationism on them. Some portion of smaller-town people (I don't know the proportion) are the opposite, though I think creationism is a much, much harder sell here than in the US.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby JayDee » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:00 am UTC

cypherspace wrote:
Quixotess wrote:To Australians: Please explain the meaning, proper usage, and origins of the expression "Blow that for a game of soldiers."

It's a British expression as far as I know. "blow" can usually be replaced with stuff or bugger. If something is evidently ridiculous and asking way too much of the person tasked with it, then you give up with "Stuff that for a lark" or "Bugger that for a game of soldiers."

Yeah, I haven't heard it like that much at all, but I imagine "fuck that for a joke" is a more crude version of the same thing. That gets plenty of use here.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby 4=5 » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:29 am UTC

crowey wrote:To people in the US, do you think brits do really bloody love the queen?(1) Similarly, bad teeth?(2) Terribly terribly polite?(3)

1 no, that's an imperial british steriotype
2 no, I've heard of someone who heard that people thought that that was the case though.
3 definitely not, I hadn't heard of anyone thinking that before (not to be mean)

when it's time to be mean we focus on the english
I"m sorry to say that the roman occupation left an impact on your looks that even the viking invasions couldn't fix.
we make fun of your royalty's noses (and cousin marrying aristocrats)
and just for fun we like to think of your boarding schools as home to illicit homosexual happenings

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby |Erasmus| » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:34 am UTC

telcontar42 wrote:So are political issues like gay marriage, abortion, and teaching evolution/creationism in schools significant issues in other countries or is they just the result of the religious fundamentalism in the US?


gay marriage and abortion are, but I don't know of any schools stupid enough to teach creationism these days. There are some fundamentalist groups around here, but I don't think it's as bad as over there.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:55 am UTC

Vox Imperatoris wrote:>100-Extremely hot, old people might die. You don't want to be outside. Rarely happens in the summer for more than a very short time.
90-Very Hot. You still probably don't want to be outside. Common in the summer.
80-Hot. Bearable, but not comfortable for me. This is the default temperature range in the summer.
70-Good. Upper seventies is warm, and lower seventies is what most people set their air conditioners to. Default spring/fall temperature.
60-Cool. Still fine, but lower sixties gets a bit chilly.
50-Chilly. You probably want a coat, or at least more than a T-shirt. This only happens in the winter.
40-Cold. You definitely want a coat. This happens for short periods of time in the winter.
30-Freezing. 32 is the freezing point. Basically, barring a snowstorm, you're only going to encounter this at night in mid-winter. It has snowed here enough to cover the ground approximately 3 times in 15 years. (Although there was a big blizzard the year after I was born. Our weather is weird.)
20-Very Cold. Does not happen.
10-Extremely Cold. Are you joking?
<0-Canada Temperature. 0 is about -18 Celsius.

That's interesting, because my chart would look nearly the same, except maybe move everything three degrees down (so 97 rarely, if ever, happens.) And I live in Seattle, which is considered to be pretty much the standard for mild climate. (I'm told it's a lot like London, but I've only ever been there for two weeks, so not enough to judge.)
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Poochy
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Poochy » Sun Aug 24, 2008 6:23 am UTC

crowey wrote:To people in the US, do you think brits do really bloody love the queen?(1) Similarly, bad teeth?(2) Terribly terribly polite?(3)

1. My impression is that the queen is basically treated like a celebrity. Same for the rest of the royal family.
2. Nah. It's just a stereotype, and I have no idea where it comes from.
3. Not sure about "terribly terribly polite", but certainly a lot more polite than the average American. Not as polite as the Japanese, though.

For those of you outside the US: How annoying/obnoxious/sleazy are advertisements where you live? (I really have to wonder if anybody can beat US marketing teams at sleaziness. I've been to Taiwan and Japan, and advertising in those countries are a lot more ethical. For comparison, I'm convinced some US ads are actually trying to induce a psychological disorder just to create a need for their product.)
clintonius wrote:"You like that, RIAA? Yeah, the law burns, doesn't it?"
GENERATION 63,728,127: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig and divide the generation number by 2 if it's even, or multiply it by 3 then add 1 if it's odd. Social experiment.

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kellsbells
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby kellsbells » Sun Aug 24, 2008 6:32 am UTC

Quixotess wrote:
Vox Imperatoris wrote:>100-Extremely hot, old people might die. You don't want to be outside. Rarely happens in the summer for more than a very short time.
90-Very Hot. You still probably don't want to be outside. Common in the summer.
80-Hot. Bearable, but not comfortable for me. This is the default temperature range in the summer.
70-Good. Upper seventies is warm, and lower seventies is what most people set their air conditioners to. Default spring/fall temperature.
60-Cool. Still fine, but lower sixties gets a bit chilly.
50-Chilly. You probably want a coat, or at least more than a T-shirt. This only happens in the winter.
40-Cold. You definitely want a coat. This happens for short periods of time in the winter.
30-Freezing. 32 is the freezing point. Basically, barring a snowstorm, you're only going to encounter this at night in mid-winter. It has snowed here enough to cover the ground approximately 3 times in 15 years. (Although there was a big blizzard the year after I was born. Our weather is weird.)
20-Very Cold. Does not happen.
10-Extremely Cold. Are you joking?
<0-Canada Temperature. 0 is about -18 Celsius.

That's interesting, because my chart would look nearly the same, except maybe move everything three degrees down (so 97 rarely, if ever, happens.) And I live in Seattle, which is considered to be pretty much the standard for mild climate. (I'm told it's a lot like London, but I've only ever been there for two weeks, so not enough to judge.)
Another Seattle-ite, and yes, I agree. We have the mildest climate ever. Coldest I've ever actually been in was like 4 F, skiing in Snoqualmie Pass. TOO COLD.
A good pun is its own reword.
L wrote:A day without kells is a day not worth living.

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Quixotess
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sun Aug 24, 2008 6:44 am UTC

Oh man. Has it been ridiculously and uncomfortably hot lately or what? Last weekend=misery. I actually caved and put my hair up for the first time in, like, ever.
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EstLladon
Beat you to the park. From RUSSIA.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby EstLladon » Sun Aug 24, 2008 7:38 am UTC

>30: Brain melt.
30: Damn, this city is killing me - we should get out of it. Hottest days of summer.
20: Normal temperature you can do whatever you want without thinking about temperature.
10: It is cold when it is autumn and really warm when it is spring.
0: First part of the winter.
-10: If it is warmer it is not real winter.
-20: Time to start thinking what to wear in order not to freeze off valuable body parts.
-25: Schools close.
-30: Everything works but everybody stays inside. Rarely happens. Last time in 2005.

And it is for Moscow. There much colder places in my country. And it is not unheard of children who play hockey outside because school is closed because of low temperature.
From Russia with math.

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ishikiri
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ishikiri » Sun Aug 24, 2008 7:45 am UTC

Poochy wrote:For those of you outside the US: How annoying/obnoxious/sleazy are advertisements where you live? (I really have to wonder if anybody can beat US marketing teams at sleaziness. I've been to Taiwan and Japan, and advertising in those countries are a lot more ethical. For comparison, I'm convinced some US ads are actually trying to induce a psychological disorder just to create a need for their product.)

I assume you mean the drug adverts?

I don't think they would last very long here. They probably would be take down by. . . whoever it is that takes adverts off the air.
clintonius wrote:The "thwak thwak thwak" in this movie makes me think they cranked up a powerpoint slideshow of angry pictures set to the soundtrack of a furious masturbator.

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Poochy
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Poochy » Sun Aug 24, 2008 8:12 am UTC

ishikiri wrote:I assume you mean the drug adverts?

I don't think they would last very long here. They probably would be take down by. . . whoever it is that takes adverts off the air.

Not just drug adverts. Toy commercials, fast food/restaurant commercials, cosmetics, etc. All those commercials seem to be devised by people with no moral standards whatsoever in the US an amazingly high percent of the time.
clintonius wrote:"You like that, RIAA? Yeah, the law burns, doesn't it?"
GENERATION 63,728,127: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig and divide the generation number by 2 if it's even, or multiply it by 3 then add 1 if it's odd. Social experiment.

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Amarantha
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Amarantha » Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:36 am UTC

crowey wrote:To Australians: Are you really wary of the wildlife, or do you get used to the fact that everything is deadly?


It's generally all right if you remember to take a stick. I killed a spider on my car today with a stick. But you have to watch out for dropbears. Vicious little buggers.

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Felstaff
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Felstaff » Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:12 pm UTC

Amarantha wrote:But you have to watch out for dropbears. Vicious little buggers.


The same for when you visit Scotland (Taking a h'whacking stick with you, that is). Wild, untamed haggis have a habit of chasing hikers down hills. Bloody things.

Also: "Sod that for a game of soldiers" was first used, I believe, by Rik Mayall in the 1980s anarchic sitcom The Young Ones. I'm pretty sure it's a Pom, rather than Aussie thing. Other permutations include exchanging 'sod' for fuck/bugger/stuff/screw/cypherspace, and generally means 'fuck that, I'm going to do something easier/safer'.
Away, you scullion! you rampallion! You fustilarian! I'll tickle your catastrophe.


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