Questions For The World

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Jesse
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Jesse » Sat Aug 16, 2008 8:07 am UTC

On British accents, Brummie and Scouse are so different from the more well-known british accents that they almost sound like a different country's language.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quixotess » Sat Aug 16, 2008 8:48 am UTC

Freakish wrote:Is it really that hard adjusting to driving on snow in places where you don't see it often?

I'm in the Seattle area. We don't get a lot of snow, sometimes five times a year, sometimes none at all. My dad was raised in Spokane (which if you don't know is a largish city on the eastern side of Washington state), where he tells me there is pretty much constant snow all winter long. And he's better than most people here at driving in snow because he has had more practice. But the key difficulty, at least here, isn't that we don't have enough practice. It's the damn hills. Spokane is a flat flat city compared to Seattle and the general area west of the Cascades. Here? The hills, they are everywhere and they are dangerous.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby |Erasmus| » Sat Aug 16, 2008 9:00 am UTC

4=5 wrote:
Iori_Yagami wrote:Ok, it's fine. So most of the people live in standalone houses, posh or not. Probably public housing is not as common as in post-USSR area? As well as other 'public' services. I read somewere that in US even dinner plates are washed in dirty sink water because it is too expensive to leave the tap open while you do the dishes under running water.

I also have an impression that different countries have different values on different goods. They say highly developed world (Western Europe, North America, Japan) have much cheaper technical stuff (such as electronics or vehicles or production equipment), but more expensive food, clothing and other basic things. I mean, some 10 years ago it was uncommon in my area to have someone own a PC at home. OTOH, fast food and instant meals were uncommon, and nobody thought that vegetables, bread, milk are something 'special'. Now we are slowly moving to other pole - you can't find real butter anymore (at insane 10x price maybe) - only 'vegetable fat mixture' or some other fake. OTOH, now even kids on bus stops discuss NTFS benefits over FAT. :?:

If dishes are done by hand it is always with almost boilingly hot running water (put dish soap in the sink turn on the hot water and scrub some dishes handing each when done to someone else who rinses them in water too hot to touch and then another group of people dry them and put them away), water is very cheap.


You do -NOT- wash dishes under running water.

However, this is from someone living in Australia, where even the wet parts are in constant water shortage. It's still a very silly idea, though.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby mrbaggins » Sat Aug 16, 2008 11:23 am UTC

Aussie reporting for answers.

Has milo. Believes it to be awesome, especially in 50:50 mixes with milk.

If I were asked to make an assumption about guns in the US, I'd say 70%+ have them, and that 20% or more carry them. Compared to say 20% of Aussies owning one and 1% carrying them around. Likewise, the two story house, white picket fence, garage on the side, 'american dream' is what I would expect in any sort of spread out suburb (IE: Not in the big cities, but on the outskirts, and all through major towns).

Washes a few days worth of dishes (for one person) in two sink fulls of water. Occasionally washes up just one or two things needed under running water. KNOWS that it goes down the drain a different way in the northern hemisphere, and WONDERS what it does exactly in between.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby LL Cool J » Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:46 pm UTC

I'm an Australian who loves milo and can't really imagine living without vegemite, even though I only eat it very sparingly (on toast, with butter, no clumps please). Anyone know of other foods that are specific to your country? Everyone has had lamingtons, right? Apparently that's Australian food, too.

We wash our dishes every night in two sinks of water, both as hot as possible. One sink with detergent, one to rinse. We're under water restrictions: four minute showers, no hoses whatsoever, alternating watering days for gardens (buckets or watering cans only), no sprinklers etc etc. Washing your dishes under running water seems bizarre to me.

Do I think all Americans own guns? No, despite what Michael Moore has told me. Still, the only people I have ever met here who own guns live on farming properties, and thus have practical reasons to own firearms.

I know this question was addressed to Europeans, but I'll answer it anyway. I would never ever assume that anyone I met belonged to any religion. In fact, I'd probably assume they were agnostic or atheist if they were around my age. It's a bit of a surprise to find students at my university who are religious. It's not that they're unheard of or marginalised, but usually we all get along so well that I don't even think about it. It's nice to meet reasonable people who you can have a reasonable discussion about religion with. At high school everyone was anti-religion, ambivalent, or nutty-happy-kill-the-fags-religious. Fun fun.

This is getting long, but I love this stuff.
I can tell the difference between a few types of American accents, but Canadian accents sometimes sound like American accents to me. Can you guys tell the difference between Australian and New Zealand accents? I've been told it's impossible, but we sound nothing alike!
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby cypherspace » Sat Aug 16, 2008 1:31 pm UTC

Ieatsoap6 wrote:
cypherspace wrote:
Ieatsoap6 wrote:Do all other British people sound pretty much the same? Probably a stupid question, but still...

All Americans sound the same to you? Even I can tell the difference between Texas, New York and California. No, British people don't all sound even close to the same.

It's not that all Americans sound the same, per se. More that if I heard a person talk, I can say "that's an American." I'm wondering if there's some characteristic that non-Americans pick up on to do the same. Having lived here, it's hard (for me) to figure out what an "American" accent is. There may simply be too much diversity to define only one accent.

Does that make more sense?

Well.. yes, and no. Yes, in that the answer to the question "can you identify other British people without trouble" is almost always yes. To "Is there a single characteristic to the accents that you hear that links them"? ...no, but more to the point I'm surprised you're trying to figure out what an "American" accent is, given that you already noticed that there isn't one.

British accents are hugely varied and certain places include entirely different words to other parts of the country, almost making them dialects.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby 4=5 » Sat Aug 16, 2008 6:37 pm UTC

|Erasmus| wrote:
4=5 wrote:
Iori_Yagami wrote:Ok, it's fine. So most of the people live in standalone houses, posh or not. Probably public housing is not as common as in post-USSR area? As well as other 'public' services. I read somewere that in US even dinner plates are washed in dirty sink water because it is too expensive to leave the tap open while you do the dishes under running water.

I also have an impression that different countries have different values on different goods. They say highly developed world (Western Europe, North America, Japan) have much cheaper technical stuff (such as electronics or vehicles or production equipment), but more expensive food, clothing and other basic things. I mean, some 10 years ago it was uncommon in my area to have someone own a PC at home. OTOH, fast food and instant meals were uncommon, and nobody thought that vegetables, bread, milk are something 'special'. Now we are slowly moving to other pole - you can't find real butter anymore (at insane 10x price maybe) - only 'vegetable fat mixture' or some other fake. OTOH, now even kids on bus stops discuss NTFS benefits over FAT. :?:

If dishes are done by hand it is always with almost boilingly hot running water (put dish soap in the sink turn on the hot water and scrub some dishes handing each when done to someone else who rinses them in water too hot to touch and then another group of people dry them and put them away), water is very cheap.


You do -NOT- wash dishes under running water.

However, this is from someone living in Australia, where even the wet parts are in constant water shortage. It's still a very silly idea, though.

to justify it I live by the coast so alot of rain comes off the ocean, and then more water is dumped on us from the clouds hitting the mountains, even during the summer you never have to water anything except lawns and we once had 28 straight days of rain.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Dingbats » Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:55 pm UTC

Vox Imperatoris wrote:Question: Europeans, (and yes, I know the answers will be different for different countries) you meet someone. Would you assume that this person is probably Christian? I'm not saying you would act super-cautious about it, but would you say it is more or less likely?

Living in Sweden, and I assume everyone I meet is atheist. If someone said they're truly religious I'd give them a weird look for the couple of seconds I need to rethink the way I view them, and then proceed as normal. If they just mentioned they believe in God I'd assume it's in the same way they believe in never walking under a ladder.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Mr. Beck » Sat Aug 16, 2008 11:56 pm UTC

rustedneurons wrote:Do Americans really hate Vegemite? Can you even GET Vegemite?

A friend of mine in eight grade gave me Marmite once. I loved it, but have never seen it here since.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby telcontar42 » Sun Aug 17, 2008 12:24 am UTC

__jess wrote:I can tell the difference between a few types of American accents, but Canadian accents sometimes sound like American accents to me. Can you guys tell the difference between Australian and New Zealand accents? I've been told it's impossible, but we sound nothing alike!

Yeah, I am an American and I often can not distinguish a Canadian accent. I really have no concept of what a New Zealand accent sounds like, so I can't help you there.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby AngrySquirrel » Sun Aug 17, 2008 12:29 am UTC

Err.. isn't Milo a type of washing powder? For wool and silk?

Vox Imperatoris wrote:Question: Europeans, (and yes, I know the answers will be different for different countries) you meet someone. Would you assume that this person is probably Christian? I'm not saying you would act super-cautious about it, but would you say it is more or less likely?


Usually the people I meet don't have a clear stance on whether they think there is a God or not. Very often they don't really care. (Norway)

Question for the people from USA: Is circumcision really as common there as Hollywood makes it seem? (More normal that boys get circumcised than not?)

Oh and for those of central Europe and Britain: Would you find it strange to have to take an airplane to get to a location within your own country? (Overheard a conversation about this on the subway in London, got me a bit curious).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby benjhuey » Sun Aug 17, 2008 12:33 am UTC

__jess wrote:Can you guys tell the difference between Australian and New Zealand accents? I've been told it's impossible, but we sound nothing alike!

No, it's nearly impossible. Coincidentally, I watched an episode of Flight of the Concords last night at a friends house. Jemaine tried to demonstrate the distinction between an Australian and New Zealand accent. I suppose it was meant to be humorous, for us at least, because no distinction could be made.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby telcontar42 » Sun Aug 17, 2008 12:34 am UTC

AngrySquirrel wrote:Question for the people from USA: Is circumcision really as common there as Hollywood makes it seem? (More normal that boys get circumcised than not?)

Yes. It has been becoming less common though. It might be down to around 50/50 for newborn boys now.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby AKAnotu » Sun Aug 17, 2008 1:03 am UTC

__jess wrote:Can you guys tell the difference between Australian and New Zealand accents? I've been told it's impossible, but we sound nothing alike!
I can, but that's only because my sister has a friend from New Zealand.

@Iori_Yagami
Pools aren't very common where I live. However, every house around here is two story, and has a large basement (IE enough that it might as well be considered a story) as well.


Nobody around here uses vegemite as well.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby LL Cool J » Sun Aug 17, 2008 1:52 am UTC

AngrySquirrel wrote:Err.. isn't Milo a type of washing powder? For wool and silk?


Milo is delicious chocolate stuff that you put in milk or make hot chocolate out of. Not really like nesquik, which dissolves into the milk. Milo is sort of crumbly rather than powdery. It also tastes great on ice cream.

I wholeheartedly endorse this product and/or service.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby cyberia » Sun Aug 17, 2008 1:58 am UTC

Question:

Do many cities outside Australia have urban sprawl?

In Melbourne there is a CBD (central business district) that is about 10x10 blocks of office buildings and retail shops. The city is ringed by suburbs that feed into the CBD with main arterial roads. These roads will often be tens of kilometres long and will travel through dozens of suburbs until you get to the final suburbs of Melbourne.

Maps of Melbourne:
Spoiler:
Image

Image


From what I've seen in media (TV, movies, etc) most American cities seem to be a large CBD that is then connected to suburbs by a freeway. There always seems to be a very distinct delineation between the CBD and the suburbs with a big void between the two. And the suburbs always seem to be very planned and deliberate whereas in Melbourne the suburbs are a result of natural population movement and seem to have sprung up literally street-by-street as more people moved into each area.

I guess my question is: how is your city laid out?
How far away do you live from the CBD?
Do you spend a lot of time in the CBD?
I go into the city every day for work (although I only live 15 minutes away in an inner suburb) and any social activities will either be in the city or in one of the 3 or 4 inner suburbs that border the CBD but I have this preconception that - again, in the US - it's not uncommon to never leave the 'suburbs' and that, again, there's a definite delineation between the 'suburbs' and the 'downtown' or 'city'.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby 4=5 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 4:26 am UTC

The layout of the city is directly caused by when it was built. One hundred years ago the style was a rectangular grid of single family housing with corner stores every couple blocks. Fifty years ago the style was large developments of single-family-housing developments laid out in a unpredictable dendrite structure. Rural areas gradually acquire houses right next to the long straight roads.

Downtown is where-ever the source of trade was when the city was built. New businesses are built at intersections and along major roads.

Where I am there the development was mainly 100 years ago, so there is single family housing with each house when it is sold getting replaced with two houses.


downtown was devastated in the sixties when a mall moved all the commerce away, we are reviteliseing it now so I actually spend a fair amount, monday robotics club meetings are downtown.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby rustedneurons » Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:52 am UTC

Also, do all American public schools lack uniforms? If so/not, how do you feel about this?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Mon Aug 18, 2008 1:55 pm UTC

rustedneurons wrote:Also, do all American public schools lack uniforms? If so/not, how do you feel about this?


Not all, but the vast majority. I like it. How else would I wear my awesome shirt?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby 4=5 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 5:33 pm UTC

I've noticed that as people grow older they accumulate more and more stuff sometimes to the point that the house is a series of tunnels with boxes filling every available space. I think this is partially a result of living through the great depression so I'm wondering how much stuff your grandparents keep.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:07 pm UTC

AngrySquirrel wrote:Question for the people from USA: Is circumcision really as common there as Hollywood makes it seem? (More normal that boys get circumcised than not?)

I don't know what the current circumcision rate is, but for any male around my age (28) and older, it's rare to not be.

cyberia wrote:Question:Do many cities outside Australia have urban sprawl?

To give you an idea, somewhat...

I drive 10 miles to and from work, roughly - my workplace being more or less in the downtown area. During the non-rush hours, it takes about 15 minutes to get from my workplace to my house. During the rush hours, it takes anywhere between 20 minutes and 50 minutes, depending on which way I choose, the time of day (That is, if I leave at 8:30, it takes 30 minutes.. if I leave at 8:40, it takes 30. If I leave at 8:50, it takes 20. Go figure) and how many other people decided to take the same way. Wrecks and such are completely unpredictable, naturally, but add anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour to the trip.

Yes, it's taken me an hour and a half to go 10 miles before.

From my house... which due to various idiotic reasons is technically in a different city... within a two mile radius I can get everything I'd ever need and most things I'd ever want, outside of comics. There's a.. for lack of a better term.. college/hippy street that I occasionally visit for whatever reason and sometimes drive down as it's one of the ways I get to and from work thats -as you described- kinda a border suburb, I guess.. but then, parts of it are close enough to still consider some of it downtown... I know when I'm in the suburbs, and I know when I'm in downtown, I'm just not too sure on where the border is, exactly.

If I had a different job or whatever, then yeah, it'd be possible that I'd never have a reason - in my day-to-day life - to leave my neighborhood. Within two miles, I've got four grocery stores, I don't care to count how many restaurants, a couple of different hardware shops, and so on. I mean, there's a train/model hobby shop that I visit every now and again.

All that being said, public transit consists of a bus system. The bus system was laid out by a crack-addled monkey who'd been shooting speed into it's eyeball for a week straight and was shown a map. While the stops were made at logical spots, the routes were simply done via where the poo ended up on the map. Timing was done using a stone Mayan Calendar with bits of string glued to it and a couple of racing stripes to make it go faster.

I mean.. case in point, if I wanted to ride the bus to work, it'd require taking a bus heading parallel to my work, one heading in the opposite direction, and finally the one to take me downtown. Getting home requires four buses, none of which have paths even remotely similar to the ones I took to get there in the first place.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Ieatsoap6 » Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:51 pm UTC

4=5 wrote:I..so I'm wondering how much stuff your grandparents keep.

Neither of mine keep an abnormal amount of stuff. Their houses look(ed) like any other house. My uncle was different, but he was also batshit crazy...

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby KingLoser » Tue Aug 19, 2008 1:43 am UTC

Question: Europeans, (and yes, I know the answers will be different for different countries) you meet someone. Would you assume that this person is probably Christian? I'm not saying you would act super-cautious about it, but would you say it is more or less likely?


I like this question.

When I was born, everyone was not only Christian, but Roman Catholic. All our schools were Catholic, and there was a place in our National Constitution to outline the importance of the church in society.

Fast forward to now (I'm not that old.. 23) and you can assume nothing. It's a melting pot of different cultures, the older people are having a hard time with it, but the new generation have embraced it pretty well.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby apricity » Tue Aug 19, 2008 2:25 am UTC

3fj wrote:I have a wad of questions for New Yorkers:
I want to live in a small flat in Manhattan, nothing fancy.
  • Whats the average rental cost?
  • Where do you get the bulk of your groceries?
  • Are there any stupid laws i should know about?
  • Hows the cost of living?
  • Hows the internet there? (Seems like a stupid one, by this i mean connection speeds/pricing)
  • Whats the cost of a pint of beer?

Hey, I am glad I'm the first person to get to answer this!

Well, rent depends entirely on the neighborhood you want to live in. This website will probably help a LOT. Brooklyn or Queens would be much cheaper, although a longer commute to midtown (which is where all the office buildings are, so if you want an office job chances are excellent you'd have to commute there every day). Roommates also makes it cheaper. Try scouring Craigslist to see more of your options and more of the norms. Be aware of broker's fees, which often cost 2 months rent, and the extra $150 or so a month that utilities would cost you.

I get my groceries at one of the many supermarkets around. There are some cheap ones, like Pathmark, that usually have great sales and off-brand food for cheaper than normal, but the food is generally marked up. Whole Foods and Trader Joe's are SUPER popular for organic healthy stuff, although TJ is much cheaper. Then there's D'Agostino, Associated, Food Emporium, Gristedes, and a bunch of other supermarkets scattered around, plus plenty of little nothing markets in between. There are also Farmers' Markets scattered around the city. So yeah, plenty of places to buy food.

I don't really know of any stupid laws off the top of my head. Cost of living is very, very high, but minimum wage is also higher here than in other parts of the country, and there are a lot more jobs than elsewhere too. I haven't really gone through the internet thing, because my building is one of the very few in NYC that is able to get FiOS, which is the newest option and probably wouldn't apply to wherever you end up living. However, I do know that the whole city is divided up so for cable service, you can either get Cablevision or RCN, and you have no other choice other than the one allotted to your building. It may be that way for internet service as well, I'm not sure. Internet seems to be about $50 per month no matter what though, or you can pay more to have a faster connection speed. The most basic speeds are pretty good though, but I don't know exactly what they are. Check out the Time Warner website, that should say what the speed is.

I don't drink beer, but there are plenty of places that have great specials. I think good imports are around $8, or you can get the cheap American stuff for like $2-3.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Poochy » Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:50 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:All that being said, public transit consists of a bus system. The bus system was laid out by a crack-addled monkey who'd been shooting speed into it's eyeball for a week straight and was shown a map. While the stops were made at logical spots, the routes were simply done via where the poo ended up on the map. Timing was done using a stone Mayan Calendar with bits of string glued to it and a couple of racing stripes to make it go faster.

This sounds oddly like the school buses I rode in elementary and middle school. I still remember at the end of the first day of first grade, when after about 10 minutes on the bus, I suddenly heard a bunch of people exclaiming, "Look! There's [school name] again!" Yep, we had gone in a circle.

Then a couple years later, they re-drafted the bus routes. Not that there was any improvement. For a span of about 5-6 years, our bus would approach one stop without stopping, then make a huge loop around. About 20 minutes later, we'd approach the same intersection from another direction and finally stop.

I also had a couple bus drivers who admitted that they thought the routes were stupid, but they had to follow the directions the Vogons gave them.

In retrospect, it probably would've been faster if I had walked.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby stockpot » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:11 am UTC

rustedneurons wrote:Also, do all American public schools lack uniforms? If so/not, how do you feel about this?

At least on the west coast, almost all of them lack uniforms. Instead we have dress codes which may often ban things like baggy clothing, bandanas, hats, and non-ear piercings. I've never heard of a public school in my state that requires a uniform. In my area, private Christian schools may or may not require uniforms, and private secular schools never do.

From what I've seen in media (TV, movies, etc) most American cities seem to be a large CBD that is then connected to suburbs by a freeway. There always seems to be a very distinct delineation between the CBD and the suburbs with a big void between the two. And the suburbs always seem to be very planned and deliberate whereas in Melbourne the suburbs are a result of natural population movement and seem to have sprung up literally street-by-street as more people moved into each area.
Larger American cities do often have large business districts fed by freeways, but there is no void between city centers and suburbs. Move away from the city center and you'll find stores and and highish density housing - local history and geography will determine where within the city the rich and poor people live. You'll find apartments, duplexes, and single family homes with small yards within the city limits. Movies don't show this because it's not interesting. Move further away, and the housing gets roomier (and often cheaper). You might find yourself technically in a different town although there are no clear lines between municipalities, and not all of them have real city centers - they may exist primarily to house commuters. Further out, you'll find suburbs. Yes, American suburbs are highly planned, but they're planned to turn a profit and provide a "family" image, not to cut sprawl or commuting times. They'll usually have nice conveniences like wide streets and new sidewalks, but they lack public transportation and are often built onto older arterials which can't support the necessary volume of traffic. Freeways definitely do reduce commute times, but they become heavily clogged at rush hour. Movies don't show this part either because it's also boring.

Public transit in American cities varies from Rather Good to Nonexistent

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:20 am UTC

Question for the Torontonians who live on xkcd: how widespread is the notion that "Toronto = Canada, and everything else is just a region"?

Out here, we get the impression that TOians resent the West (or the Atlantic, or the North) if we should happen to take any of their glory. Is it really that bad, or is it mostly a few bumchucks messing up the waters for the majority of regional-egalitarians?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Vox Imperatoris » Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:57 am UTC

Question for non-US people: If I told you something weighed a pound, would you have a rough idea of how much that is? ("Instinctively", not memorizing conversion facts.) How about an inch long?

I have a pretty good mental picture of a centimeter, but for kilogram I just think, "Ok, that's more than a pound but not too heavy," I don't have a "natural" conception of it at all.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby EstLladon » Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:05 am UTC

Vox Imperatoris wrote:Question for non-US people: If I told you something weighed a pound, would you have a rough idea of how much that is? ("Instinctively", not memorizing conversion facts.) How about an inch long?

I have a pretty good mental picture of a centimeter, but for kilogram I just think, "Ok, that's more than a pound but not too heavy," I don't have a "natural" conception of it at all.

I've memorized conversion facts long ago and pretty good, so I cannot really tell the difference between "instinctively" and not. And kilogram is exactly how much a litre (a tad more than a quart) of something liquid you can buy at grocery store weighs (e.g. water, juice, cola). It is actually more than two pounds.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby KingLoser » Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:05 am UTC

Vox Imperatoris wrote:Question for non-US people: If I told you something weighed a pound, would you have a rough idea of how much that is? ("Instinctively", not memorizing conversion facts.) How about an inch long?

I have a pretty good mental picture of a centimeter, but for kilogram I just think, "Ok, that's more than a pound but not too heavy," I don't have a "natural" conception of it at all.


I know a pint when I see one.

I have a rough idea of pounds and ounces, but distance is fine yeah. Inches and miles are instinct, I normally say around 1.5km to the mile, don't even know how accurate that is right now. I'm sure some google junkie will pick me up on it!
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby cypherspace » Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:11 am UTC

Fine with most imperial measurements. I think of a kilo as a bag of sugar, and a pound as half that. Inches no problem. Feet, yards, miles, fine. Hectares and acres though, not a fuckin' clue. I'd usually convert to imperial anyway in my head for most everyday things, unless it's something scientific in which case it's SI all the way.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Felstaff » Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:31 am UTC

Australians: Which of the following words do you use, if any? And which have fallen out of vogue, if any? And which have a more common word used instead?
  • Bonza
  • Great/Flamin' Galah
  • Blue (as in "G'day Blue")
  • Sheila
  • Bogan
  • Drongo
  • Two-can Sam/Two-Pot Screamer

Also, what's all this about different sized glasses? Here (in England) we have pint and half-pint glasses. Yous guys apparently have ponies, schooners, butchers and middies. [Seinfeldic Paracusia] What is the deal with that? [/paracusia]

Finally, do you still refer to us as "Whingeing Poms"?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby michaelandjimi » Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:38 am UTC

I can field most of this. I'm not old enough to drink in bars and stuff, but:

I use "bogan" a bit, and I occasionally hear Sheila. Very occasionally I hear Bonza. The rest I don't hear at all. I might not be the best to ask for this, though.

We of course still refer to you as "Whingeing Poms".
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby hermaj » Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:05 am UTC

Felstaff wrote:Australians: Which of the following words do you use, if any? And which have fallen out of vogue, if any? And which have a more common word used instead?
  • Bonza
  • Great/Flamin' Galah
  • Blue (as in "G'day Blue")
  • Sheila
  • Bogan
  • Drongo
  • Two-can Sam/Two-Pot Screamer

Also, what's all this about different sized glasses? Here (in England) we have pint and half-pint glasses. Yous guys apparently have ponies, schooners, butchers and middies. [Seinfeldic Paracusia] What is the deal with that? [/paracusia]

Finally, do you still refer to us as "Whingeing Poms"?


HI! I'll be your drunken Australian lady for this evening.

I live in a western suburbs area which really is a bogan kind of area. See? Bogan. I used one already. We use bogan still but westie is preferred where I am. (Who will wear the hat? That's a weird lyric. Segue.) Flamin' Galah is used by ex-Prime Minister and subject of his very own musical, Paul Keating. Here is a Paul Keating Insult Archive! This will provide you with some more gems. The other person or people I am aware use flamin' galah all the time are the old guys from both Home and Away and Neighbours.

Bluey! I have not called a red-haired person Bluey ever, but I have seen it written down like in Paul Jennings books. Paul Jennings was pretty awesome. And I do believe that ranga is the new word in vogue for that, as in Sorry Ranga Day. Sorry, ranga. Man, JayDee has red hair and I did not say sorry to him on Sorry Ranga day! Everyone needs to say sorry to JayDee. I assume you are using Blue to refer to red headed people because blue can also be a fight (having a blue).

tHERE - oh dear, Caps Lock! Let me start again. There are actually people whose names are Sheila and that amuses me. I do not hear sheila too often but I think in places that are kind of back of Bourke they might still say sheila. We also say bird too like how English people mean it. You are an English person so you will understand this. Drongo? I think a drongo is a hoon. I do not say drongo but I think maybe drunk old guys with wifebeaters and akubras and beer guts might say drongo. These gentlemen probably also say sheila.

Two pot screamer! That is one I have not heard in a while. I am one of those but I am commonly referred to as just a cheap drunk. We have kind of given up a lot of our old national slang because we want to fit in, maybe.

I know what a schooner is and what a middy is! I do not know where they are from place to place but if you will simply hold on a minute I have a book I bought and never sent that has the answers in it. I should send that book. But not right now, after I have found the answer. Actually, not now either because I do not know where the book is!! I did however find my slang dictionary so if there are some slang terms you do not understand I will look them up and tell you what they are. But in NSW we have middies and schooners and I think a schooner is 375mL and I think a middy is like 265mL or something dumb.

Also! Yes, we sometimes call you whinging Poms. Here are some other interesting things about poms from my slang book that I have just now find and should send once I find the other book too because postage is expensive. We have several about how Poms never shower, like when you are thirsty you are drier than a pommy's towel. Also you are "to and froms" in the old rhyming slang tradition that was yours originally, and you are also pommy bastards. All of these terms are apparently affectionate! I do not understand this because I like English people but I probably would not call one a bastard. You have a lucky deal though because according to this book, Yanks (who are usually just Yanks, really) are called septics, and that doesn't sound very nice at all and even LESS like they bathe! And really, I am sure everyone bathes.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Felstaff » Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:17 am UTC

Paul Jennings is my favourite author. I have all of his Un- books, and Quirky Tales (Tails?). I hate how they'd be massacred for that awful Round the Twist programme.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby |Erasmus| » Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:18 am UTC

I thought his books were pretty terrible...

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Amarantha » Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:30 am UTC

Felstaff wrote:Finally, do you still refer to us as "Whingeing Poms"?


Yes, but with affection :P One of my workmates is a pom, and whilst having a recent mini-rant about the workload, she apologised for spending the whole coffee-break whining. My other colleague and I were like, "Don't apologise; you've got a reputation to uphold!"

I don't know anyone who uses those other terms. Well, I've heard "two-pot screamer" recently, and some people are still called Blue. Also, the airline Virgin Blue, so named because its livery is red.

The kind of beer I drink comes in pints. I don't bother trying to remember the pot/pony/middy-type nomenclature for the various states, because I don't drink the kind of so-called beer that's served that way. But I think the local standard here is a pot.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby cyberia » Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:39 am UTC

Felstaff wrote:Australians: Which of the following words do you use, if any? And which have fallen out of vogue, if any? And which have a more common word used instead?
  • Bonza
  • Great/Flamin' Galah
  • Blue (as in "G'day Blue")
  • Sheila
  • Bogan
  • Drongo
  • Two-can Sam/Two-Pot Screamer

Also, what's all this about different sized glasses? Here (in England) we have pint and half-pint glasses. Yous guys apparently have ponies, schooners, butchers and middies. [Seinfeldic Paracusia] What is the deal with that? [/paracusia]

Finally, do you still refer to us as "Whingeing Poms"?


I use 'bogan' constantly because I work for The Man and spend all day listening to bogans complain.

I use 'bonza' when I'm trying to annoy my friends or if I'm impersonating a bogan. Same with 'sheila' and 'Blue'. No one really says 'flamin' galahs' and there are about a million different terms for a 'two-pot screamer' I normally say 'Cadbury' (two and a half glasses) or 'lightweight'.

There really are people that talk like Crocodile Dundee but they (thank fuck) tend to live in the country; far, far away from me.

I haven't called someone a 'whingeing pom' in years because my nationalistic-hate is directed towards the brown-skinned hordes from the subcontinent.

Glass-sizes vary from state-to-state. In Victoria (the best state), we have 'pots' (285ml, standard serve), 'pints' (475ml, big drink), and 'jugs' (1140ml, share between mates).

Standard pricing is: pot - $4, pint - $6, jug - $10. You should never pay more than the cost of two smaller drinks for a larger drink.

Slang I use:

'apples' - She'll be apples, mate.

'munted' - I took so many drugs last night, I was munted.

'trashed' - I had a big night last night, I'm trashed.

'beaut' - That's a beaut car, mate.

'cunt' - Fuck, I hate those Indian cunts, mate.

'westie' - see 'bogan'.

'scumbag' - see 'westie'

~~~

A lot of slang is used to disparage the socio-economic classes either above or below you.

edit - Someone needs to take the apostrophe key off my keyboard :shock:
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Dingbats » Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:02 pm UTC

I can pretty much instinctively picture an inch (although not as exactly as a centimeter). Feet, yards and miles I have to convert to metric (well, if someone says "X is 100 yards long" I just think "a little less than 100 meters"). I barely know how much a kilogram is instinctively, so definitely not a pound.

Given a Fahrenheit temperature I'm clueless.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:04 pm UTC

Vox Imperatoris wrote:I have a pretty good mental picture of a centimeter, but for kilogram I just think, "Ok, that's more than a pound but not too heavy," I don't have a "natural" conception of it at all.


A kilogram is 2.something pounds, so.. yeah, that's more than a pound. More than two pounds.

So.. yeah, Kilograms are a little more than two pounds. Pounds are a little less than half of a kilogram.

Dingbats - for Fahrenheit just thing that the average person likes it to be around 73 degrees (That's 22.7 Celsius). That's comfortable. Some people like it as low as 68 (20), some as high as 78 (25), but about everyone can agree that 73 is comfortable.

Body temperature is 98.stuff, so just a bit below 100. Anything above 100 in body temperature is a fever.

Dunno if any of that helps. Generally speaking, the temperature needs to go up or down two degrees before there's a notifiable difference.
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