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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:36 pm UTC
by wumpus
Grop wrote:They should read the manual again, because Satan doesn't kill people.


He's apparently allowed (with God's blessing) to kill when settling a bet between himself and God. See the Book of Job and Job's children. God kills larger numbers and far more often.

/this apparently counts as [a divine] prosecutor misbehavior. Satan isn't a cop (unless you count his job in entrapment as cop work).

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:19 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
I initially posted this to the "News in brief" thread, but if there's discussion, it will be more on-topic here.

I found this map interesting:

Image

Some snippets from a discussion of the implications at The Appeal:

Spoiler:
Approximately 500 prosecutors and sheriffs will be elected in 2019, nearly all of them in six states: Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

These elections could expand the successes achieved in 2017 and 2018 by organizers looking to transform the criminal justice system and law enforcement practices. In Boston, Durham, Philadelphia, and St. Louis, to name just a few examples, winning candidates left behind traditional “tough on crime” campaigning and committed instead to significant reforms.

Yet these elections still receive the attention they deserve too infrequently. Prosecutors and sheriffs routinely enter office without facing any opponent. And those who do often avoid detailing their platforms based on the misleading claim that their jobs are apolitical. But prosecutors and sheriffs are responsible for setting a wide range of policies that impact detention conditions, incarceration rates, cooperation with ICE, and much more; their political preferences also greatly influence legislative debates. Will 2019 do justice to the fact that decisions made by county-level officials are driving mass incarceration—and that such decisions could also curb it?

These elections can struggle for publicity, especially since prosecutors’ and sheriffs’ roles are not widely known. This is an obstacle to reform-oriented candidates breaking through, especially when challenging an incumbent. “90 percent of my campaign was actually an education about what a DA is, what a DA does,” Corey Williams, who lost an election in Oklahoma, said in November. The fact that 2019 is unencumbered by federal races could help the groups organizing to improve local officials’ visibility. But it could also hinder turnout and mobilization, and the fact that filing and registration deadlines are popping up so soon after the 2018 midterms poses challenges of its own.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 2:14 am UTC
by ijuin
Given that only six states seem to have elected Sheriffs, it may be the that some people in those states spend most of the time being unaware that the office of Sheriff is an elected one rather than an appointed one, and find themselves mildly surprised when they see it on their sample ballots because it has caught them unawares.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 4:10 am UTC
by bbluewi
Those six states are (just about) the only ones with sheriffs being elected in 2019. As far as I'm aware, they're elected everywhere with varying term lengths and election years, with a couple exceptions (the position doesn't exist in Alaska or Connecticut, while some large cities are merged with their county governments and create some interesting structures).

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 4:40 am UTC
by pogrmman
bbluewi wrote:Those six states are (just about) the only ones with sheriffs being elected in 2019. As far as I'm aware, they're elected everywhere with varying term lengths and election years, with a couple exceptions (the position doesn't exist in Alaska or Connecticut, while some large cities are merged with their county governments and create some interesting structures).

Yeah. Texas, for instance, elected sheriffs in 2016 and they have 4 year terms. I found this state by state listing from the national sheriffs’ association.

They’re a county-wide office, so they are different from your local police. They’re certainly not all poorly contested races — the last one I voted in had candidates from four parties (Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, and Greens) and all were serious candidates. It’s not like the whole department is elected, but the head of the department is.

At least around here, it seems like the judicial elections are the least contested ones — admittedly, a Republican doesn’t stand a chance for county courts and a Democrat doesn’t stand a chance for state courts, but it’s still a big deal! Even though the majority of the ballot is judicial races, the majority of those seem to be unopposed candidates.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 4:42 am UTC
by ObsessoMom
My county had very heated battles for Sheriff and District Attorney on our June 2018 primary election ballot, but the incumbents still won more than 50% of the June vote, so they were declared the winners and didn't have to proceed to the November general election ballot.

But that will never happen again. On our November 2018 ballot, an initiative to make the top two finishers (including qualified write-in candidates) in all county contests proceed to the November ballot passed. Woohoo!

No more county offices being decided outright in June, when the voter turnout is much lower than November--and also far older, whiter, wealthier, and more conservative than the average, too, which is why our county board of supervisors had been 100% Republican for a long time, despite registered Republicans constituting only 19% of the registered electorate here. Voting by mail works much better for the "haves" than for the "have nots." If you are young and poor and move around a lot, and forget to re-register to vote each time you move, voting is harder for you than for the old farts who have owned the same home for decades and who like the status quo.

But I digress. Yay, less racist more progressive candidates for Sheriff and DA will now have some chance of getting elected here!

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:40 am UTC
by ObsessoMom
I'm not sure whether this is police misbehavior, or prosecutor misbehavior, or State Bar of Texas misbehavior, or some combination of those.

State Bar drops probe into ex-prosecutor accused of withholding evidence in Texas death row case

The accused in a police shooting, who was convicted and put on death row for ten years, was released in 2015 after the discovery of phone records proving that he was elsewhere at the time of the crime. A police investigator found the evidence in his own garage, over a decade after the trial, and reported it to the district attorney's office.

The retired prosecutor still adamantly insists that the accused was guilty, and that he (the prosecutor) hadn't known anything about any phone records supporting the guy's alibi...despite the inconvenient fact that a newly-elected district attorney recently discovered that these had been emailed to the retired prosecutor by the police investigator before the trial.

The newly-elected district attorney filed a complaint with the State Bar of Texas regarding the retired prosecutor's mishandling of the case.

However, this week the State Bar said that they didn't think there was any reason to pursue sanctions against the ex-prosecutor.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

In other news:

A Miami cop kicked at a suspect’s head and another covered his bodycam. The bodycam-coverer has resigned. The incident is under review.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:49 am UTC
by PAstrychef
Given that Texas has ruled that factual innocence isn’t enough to get you exonerated, and that others known to be innocent have been executed, not doing anything to a retired lawyer ten years later seems likely.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:52 am UTC
by Angua
Every time I see a story like this, I wonder about the people who like to quote the thing about letting 9 guilty men free rather than imprison one innocent one. How can people still advocate the death penalty when there are so many cases of people being wrongly convicted?

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 2:54 pm UTC
by SecondTalon
I don't understand how people who tout fiscal responsibility can also support the death penalty. It's far cheaper to just imprison someone for 60 years than it is to execute them in less than 10.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 2:58 pm UTC
by natraj
the thing is that that's a nice quote but it is literally not how many americans think, and if you have the misfortune to get into in depth conversations with many american supporters of the death penalty they will directly, outright, state to you in plain and direct language that they would rather that we execute innocent people than risk letting a guilty person free and that is an acceptable price to pay to get rid of criminals. our entire criminal system takes this mindset.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:00 pm UTC
by eran_rathan
SecondTalon wrote:I don't understand how people who tout fiscal responsibility can also support the death penalty. It's far cheaper to just imprison someone for 60 years than it is to execute them in less than 10.


Because its never about just fiscal responsibility (these are the same people who think tax breaks for billionaires make sense). Its about not giving 'their money' to the 'wrong people' - its another way of hurting POC without explicit segregation.

Also, what natraj said.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:16 pm UTC
by elasto
I think they also probably think, either consciously or unconsciously, that even if they aren't guilty of that crime specifically, anyone who puts themselves in a position to be charged with a capital crime is probably guilty of some serious crime or other, and so society is still better off without them...

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:25 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
natraj wrote:the thing is that that's a nice quote but it is literally not how many americans think, and if you have the misfortune to get into in depth conversations with many american supporters of the death penalty they will directly, outright, state to you in plain and direct language that they would rather that we execute innocent people than risk letting a guilty person free and that is an acceptable price to pay to get rid of criminals. our entire criminal system takes this mindset.


Yes. This.

I think that to many Americans who are either not POC or who are financially secure, the guilt or innocence of an individual POC and/or person struggling with poverty is not as important as terrorizing the wider community of POC and poor people, so that they fear the police and recognize that they can't expect justice from the justice system. Then those with privilege can more easily threaten to call the police when they want to maintain their own class's privilege. The support for "Tough on Crime" elected police chiefs and sheriffs and city attorneys and district attorneys is often really support for law enforcement that is "Tough on Poor People and Brown People, But Understanding and Merciful When Your White, Middle-Class Son Makes a Bad Decision."

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:07 pm UTC
by Angua
Yeah, sorry I wasn't clear when I tried to get across with that that the people who are always going on about that seem to be the most rabid defenders of the justice system status quo. Even though the justice system is clearly the opposite of that.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:15 pm UTC
by Grop
elasto wrote:I think they also probably think, either consciously or unconsciously, that even if they aren't guilty of that crime specifically, anyone who puts themselves in a position to be charged with a capital crime is probably guilty of some serious crime or other, and so society is still better off without them...


So they are assuming that it can't happen to them or to their kids.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 5:17 pm UTC
by elasto
So they are assuming that it can't happen to them or to their kids.

Basically.

It's a variant of prosperity theology: If you're rich and successful, it's because God has blessed you, which means you must be a good, upright person.

On the contrary, if you're rotting in jail, God has cursed you, which means you must be a bad, sinful person. And that remains true even if you're technically innocent of the crime you were jailed for...

It's an easy mindset to fall into if you've led a privileged life with no experience of capricious prejudice or injustice from authority figures.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 5:34 pm UTC
by Pfhorrest
It's more fundamental than prosperity theology, though that shares a common origin. It's just the Just World Hypothesis. People desperately want to believe that the world is just and that good things will come to good people and bad things will only befall bad people, and if you've convinced yourself that that is true, then bad things befalling someone implies that they must be a bad person. Even people having bad things befall them too often tend to feel like that, soul-searching for what it is that they did wrong to deserve their suffering. But of course it's even easier for people who generally have things going well for them, as it allows them to feel good about themselves, and therefore safe from the possibility of bad things happening to them, because they're obviously good people so bad things can't happen to them, since bad things only happen to bad people.

It's a really tempting thing to want to believe. Things are going relatively well for me right now, but I'm still constantly terrified of how easily it could all fall apart because I know that a lot of this is just luck that could change, not because I'm a special good person who inherently deserves this living in a world where people always get what they deserve. It would be so much comfort to be able to believe that the good things I have now are proof of my goodness and that that was a guarantee of more good things to come, and a lot of people tend to believe whatever it is comforting to believe, so I can easily see how many people could fall into that mindset.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:15 pm UTC
by elasto
Pfhorrest wrote:It's more fundamental than prosperity theology, though that shares a common origin. It's just the Just World Hypothesis. People desperately want to believe that the world is just and that good things will come to good people and bad things will only befall bad people, and if you've convinced yourself that that is true, then bad things befalling someone implies that they must be a bad person.

Yup.

It's a worldview that Americans hold more firmly than most other Western cultures I feel, partly explaining the distrust of socialism, social safety nets and so on:

Someone in a good place couldn't end up in a bad place through no fault of their own, dependent on the kindness of strangers, unless they were somehow bad, in which case they deserve it. So why should good people be punished by having their hard-earned money taken off them and distributed to bad people? Look at X who managed to fight his way out of the slums through sheer determination, thereby proving himself good; If he can do it so can every good person. So if you don't fight your way out, clearly you don't deserve to get out.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:38 pm UTC
by freezeblade
The above, combined with the "I've got mine, so fuck you" attitude is the disease that permeates the fabric of American society, concentrated more closely in the religious right than other demographics.

The fight against this contingent is closely aligned to the fight between the right and left.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:50 pm UTC
by SecondTalon
Eh, it falls in to the same sort of thing that lets someone believe outlandish conspiracy theories. Even if there's a shadowy global cabal of lizardpeople spraying chemicals from passenger jets who only want to enslave the human race, it still means *someone* is in control, and that things don't just randomly happen due to a culmination of semi- to completely unpredictable events that happen to screw one person or group over.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:13 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
I wonder. Does being given the death penalty increase the chance of being found innocent later? I mean, what with all the appeals and attention being on death row brings, compared to rotting away for decades...

SecondTalon wrote:I don't understand how people who tout fiscal responsibility can also support the death penalty. It's far cheaper to just imprison someone for 60 years than it is to execute them in less than 10.


Not quite

Every death row inmate costs an additional $90,000 per year, on top of the typical $30,000 per year for regular ol' inmates. Court cases that seek the death penalty cost about $500,000 extra, on top of the typical $750,000. Varies by state, obviously, but using your numbers of 60 years vs 10, a death row inmate costs $2.45m ($1.25m for court case, 10x$120k for prison) while the non death row inmate costs $2.55m ($750k for court case, 60x$30k for prison). So actually, virtually the same price.

While time value of money would cause the non death row inmate to be far superior, keep in mind that the costs of prison rise with inflation as prison guards require more pay and prisoner medical care gets more expensive. The medical care is... interesting, as older prisoners require far more of it, and as we get better care we live longer, further increasing the costs. Half the reason for letting old inmates out is because of the exorbitant cost of treating the old farts, rather than any actual "oh, it's the humane thing to do", which is kind of a parallel to the cruel practice of giving old slaves their "freedom" when they were too old to work. Yes, Medicare ends up paying the tab, but that's not the State's problem now is it?

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 4:42 am UTC
by Coyne
CorruptUser wrote:Every death row inmate costs an additional $90,000 per year, on top of the typical $30,000 per year for regular ol' inmates. Court cases that seek the death penalty cost about $500,000 extra, on top of the typical $750,000. Varies by state, obviously, but using your numbers of 60 years vs 10, a death row inmate costs $2.45m ($1.25m for court case, 10x$120k for prison) while the non death row inmate costs $2.55m ($750k for court case, 60x$30k for prison). So actually, virtually the same price.


You forgot to mention that, per Supreme Court ruling, a capital sentence requires a mandatory jury trial. Whereas lesser sentences, even life, can be negotiated by plea. Plea eliminates the cost of the trial and most chances for appeal.

elasto wrote:I think they also probably think, either consciously or unconsciously, that even if they aren't guilty of that crime specifically, anyone who puts themselves in a position to be charged with a capital crime is probably guilty of some serious crime or other, and so society is still better off without them...


Yeah, the old if he didn't do it he must have done something else argument. But if you convict an innocent person of the crime, the guilty person goes free.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 6:41 am UTC
by CorruptUser
Coyne wrote:
CorruptUser wrote:Every death row inmate costs an additional $90,000 per year, on top of the typical $30,000 per year for regular ol' inmates. Court cases that seek the death penalty cost about $500,000 extra, on top of the typical $750,000. Varies by state, obviously, but using your numbers of 60 years vs 10, a death row inmate costs $2.45m ($1.25m for court case, 10x$120k for prison) while the non death row inmate costs $2.55m ($750k for court case, 60x$30k for prison). So actually, virtually the same price.


You forgot to mention that, per Supreme Court ruling, a capital sentence requires a mandatory jury trial. Whereas lesser sentences, even life, can be negotiated by plea. Plea eliminates the cost of the trial and most chances for appeal.


Of course plea bargaining is cheaper; the question is whether or not a fiscally concerned sociopathic prosecutor should seek the death penalty given that the case is going to trial. But if we are including plea bargaining, I'd like to point out that in all likelihood, the death penalty increases the odds someone would take a plea deal instead of going to trial, thus saving a small fortune in that regard.



But if we were truly sociopathic in regards to money, we'd work towards creating a society that doesn't stigmatize mental illness and especially seeking a therapist to help with mental illness, as well as creating a social safety net that actually functions properly, thus eliminating entire fractions of crime in the first place...

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 3:52 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
CorruptUser wrote:But if we were truly sociopathic in regards to money, we'd work towards creating a society that doesn't stigmatize mental illness and especially seeking a therapist to help with mental illness, as well as creating a social safety net that actually functions properly, thus eliminating entire fractions of crime in the first place...


Very few socially conservative policies are fiscally conservative, no matter what conservative people say.

It's a heck of a lot less expensive in the long run to fund birth control than to not.

It's less expensive in the long run to fund preventative care than to force people to treat the emergency room as their primary physician.

It's less expensive in the long run to deal with the causes of climate change and pollution than to fund public transit projects, energy efficiency incentives, and cleaner technology. [I've edited this sentence because the way I had originally phrased it didn't actually say what I thought it did.]

And--returning to the topic at hand--It's less expensive in the long run to fund the sort of public education (and mental health care) that would allow people to lift themselves out of poverty than it is to deal with what happens when people don't (i.e., police and prisons, not to mention the losses suffered by crime victims and the societal costs of families whose would-be-breadwinners can't support them because they're dead or imprisoned).

None of the policies that conservatives hold dear are really about saving money, whatever they may say about fiscal responsibility and letting the market determine what people do. Conservatism is all about allowing certain people to "conserve" a status quo under which they have personally thrived, while keeping others from enjoying the same privileges they do. The only thriftiness they care about is getting the rest of society to foot the bill for policies that make their own group richer and everyone else poorer.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:28 pm UTC
by Grop
People who think the death penalty is a great idea, while disliking paying taxes, probably think it it too costly only because they can no longer lynch people.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 2:41 am UTC
by CorruptUser
Grop wrote:People who think the death penalty is a great idea, while disliking paying taxes, probably think it it too costly only because they can no longer lynch people.


Know a guy who thinks the death penalty should be used more often, but he isn't exactly a conservative. Well, he might be; he's into Odinism or whatever, and while yes a lot of neo-Nazis are also into that shit I don't think he's one. But anyway, his thinking is that the appeals process should more or less be automatic and near-instant, so that there isn't more than a few months between sentencing and execution. I... kinda disagree. Gears of justice grind slowly for good reasons.

Personally, I'd rather that people like Charles Manson be remembered as the toothless rotting corpse of a man he died as than have him executed immediately and forever remembered as the good looking young man he once was.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 7:44 am UTC
by ijuin
Whether they get life or death, my first concern is that they never walk free again.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 8:06 am UTC
by CorruptUser
That's kind of irrelevant. The question is whether a life sentence or an execution is more cost effective, as well as more, umm, effective effective. I'm in the "life sentence" camp, but I'm a tad nastier SOB than many of the pro-execution people, so not sure if the people here want me as an 'ally' on that one.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 7:07 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
South Carolina cops defend keeping cash they seize: 'What's the incentive' otherwise?

Snippets:

Jarrod Bruder, the executive director of the South Carolina Sheriff’s Association who frequently lobbies for law enforcement interests at the Statehouse, said that without the incentive of profit from civil forfeiture, officers probably wouldn’t pursue drug dealers and their cash as hard as they do now.

If police don’t get to keep the money from forfeiture, “what is the incentive to go out and make a special effort?” Bruder said. “What is the incentive for interdiction?”


Seriously? Wanting a more fair, just, and safe community for everyone isn't enough of an incentive for police to do police work?

(But considering that the aggressive harassment of low-income people and minorities runs counter to the goal of making communities more fair, just, and safe, I guess the profit angle is important to make aggressive harassment happen, after all.)

More:

Bruder’s comments came after being presented the research from our TAKEN investigation, which found that law enforcement agencies seized more than $17 million using state laws that allow police to seize money and property without requiring a criminal conviction or even an arrest. Most of the money and property that officers seize ends up enriching the police departments’ bank accounts.

The investigation found that in a fifth of forfeiture cases in South Carolina, no one is convicted of a crime. In 19 percent of cases, there is no criminal arrest. Law enforcement seizes property from black people 71 percent of the time, with the overwhelming majority of cases involving younger black men.

Advocates for reform say no one wants to take away law enforcement’s ability to pursue drug dealers and their profits but that forfeiture should be tied to a criminal case with proof the cash or property was profits from criminal enterprise, not just the cash someone was carrying when stopped or arrested.

Advocates also say profits from forfeiture should be sent to the state’s general fund or a fund unrelated to law enforcement to remove the incentive to seize money that would be funneled back into a department’s budget.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:34 pm UTC
by jewish_scientist
A better incentive is probably their paycheck. Police officers are payed to provide a service; police work. If they do not provide the service, then they do not get payed i.e. they are fired. I really do not see how someone who grew up in a society where trade exists not understanding this.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:38 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
I wouldnt care so much about civil forfeiture, if there wasnt that pesky "civil" in the word. That means it is done without any substantial due process or through the courts. Carrying cash through their state? Its theirs until you prove you arent a drug dealer, which itself requires huge attorney fees...

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 4:53 am UTC
by idonno
What if we were to only let them keep it after they prove to a court that it is in fact drug money? That way they are motivated to do their entire job and gather proof instead of just taking the money and moving on. It has the added bonus of actually respecting the 5th amendment's forbidding depriving anyone of property without due process of law.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:57 am UTC
by CorruptUser
The cops corrupt enough to steal $5000 from people are corrupt enough to plant drugs on their victims and send them to prison in order to steal $5000.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 1:26 pm UTC
by idonno
My primary point was that it wasn't even incentivising them to do their job because their job is not to just seize money. The need for an incentive argument is an argument against this because they clearly are taking the incentive without finishing the job so no more payment until the job is done up front would be much more rational and would actually follow the constitution.

I'm pretty sure a lot of illegitimate confiscations are opportunistic or part of major police action. If cops were routinely going around with enough drugs to frame people for dealing, I think that in pretty much 100% of questionable police shootings the police would "find" drugs on the bodies and framing everyone they are taking money from in a major police action would require a lot of drug planting so the odds of being caught go up. Also, if a cop confiscates something and it is proved to be illegitimate, there is no consequence but even cops get busted for framing people. $5,000 might be worth the small risk if the cop got to keep it but I think a lot of them wouldn't risk that to give their department $5,000. It sucks that affording people the legal protection guaranteed to them in the Bill of Rights might not always work but they do protect people.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:53 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
I'm suggesting that it makes problems an order of magnitude worse. There's a big difference between

1) the police robbing you of $5000
and
2) getting a felony conviction for something you didn't do, spending a year in prison for something you didn't do, having a felony on your record for the rest of your life for something you didn't do, and the police robbing you of $5000.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 8:33 pm UTC
by Angua
11yo arrested in Florida for not standing during Pledge.

Apparently they spent 3 days in a detention centre for non-violent resisting arrest.

The mind boggles that people can get away with this in the US.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:18 pm UTC
by Zohar
And the school is blaming this on the teacher (who's obviously racist and should be blamed for it) but not their own security officer who had this kid arrested!

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:25 pm UTC
by idonno
You left out blaming themselves for suspending the kid for three days.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:38 pm UTC
by Angua
Is there a word for your thoughts being speechless in your head so you don't even process the full awfulness that is the situation?