In other news... (humorous news items)

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Grop
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Grop » Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:03 pm UTC

This is a matter of culture; especially the part about people staying at work as long as they boss/team leader isn't leaving (and I suppose they do a lot of useless stuff to occupy that waiting).

Hopefully having laws actually consider that situation (and possibly a few trials happening) should move things about what is 'normal'.

(And then in my country we normally work for 35 hours a week; therefore this 52 hours limit sounds like the Onion).

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby speising » Wed Jul 04, 2018 12:55 pm UTC

Trump annoyed that Fake News like to pour over his tweets looking for spelling mistakes.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/sta ... 4805987330 (since corrected)

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Coyne » Wed Jul 04, 2018 3:49 pm UTC

Sableagle wrote:
addams wrote:By "some" I mean ...

Image

... many.

Strange place to choose to live.

I was looking more closely at that map, and if you go by it, things are looking up. Clearly the '60s through the '80s were bad decades, but since then there's only one subsidence I see, in 2014.

I suppose it could be something wrong with the map, but I'm sure they stand by its accuracy.
In all fairness...

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby sardia » Wed Jul 04, 2018 4:19 pm UTC

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/27/scie ... urban.html
TLDR Bee life is City~ suburbs >>>rural/farmland.
Suck it rural america. They always think they're so great, with their "great out doors, and closer to nature etc etc"

Cities aren't great for bee colonies; there's more parasites, intense competition for pollen, and the plants are designed for people not bees. But the data shows that farmland is even worse..for some reason.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Sableagle » Wed Jul 04, 2018 4:21 pm UTC

Same reason there are fewer flies buzzing around in the USA than in Austria: everything's soaked in toxic chemicals.
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby addams » Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:16 pm UTC

sardia wrote:https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/27/science/bumblebees-cities-urban.html
TLDR Bee life is City~ suburbs >>>rural/farmland.
Suck it rural america. They always think they're so great, with their "great out doors, and closer to nature etc etc"

Cities aren't great for bee colonies; there's more parasites, intense competition for pollen, and the plants are designed for people not bees. But the data shows that farmland is even worse..for some reason.
I followed the links.
I had a wonderful Time being a Bee.

Maybe, you can be a Bee, too.
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/201 ... enses.html

In my garden, I was watching a Bumblebee rolling around in a California Poppy flower.
She was there long enough for me to go get a camera, take her photo and lose interest.

I am convinced she was Rolling around in that flower for Fun!
Do you know how soft and silky California Poppy flowers are?

Imaging being able to throw yourself into one and roll around.
It must bee a Ton-of-Fun! I think she was having a tactile party.
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Coyne » Thu Jul 05, 2018 5:25 am UTC

sardia wrote:https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/27/science/bumblebees-cities-urban.html
TLDR Bee life is City~ suburbs >>>rural/farmland.
Suck it rural america. They always think they're so great, with their "great out doors, and closer to nature etc etc"

Cities aren't great for bee colonies; there's more parasites, intense competition for pollen, and the plants are designed for people not bees. But the data shows that farmland is even worse..for some reason.

Actually to me this makes sense. Designing flowered areas to please people is not the same as designing to exclude bees.While most of the flowers in cities might tend to be poor quality for bees, I would expect there are still more good flowers within a foraging area than there are in the typical countryside.

Especially since most of our staple food crops are poor for bees. Barley, corn, oats, millet, rye, sorghum, and; wheat, (as all grasses) do nothing for bees; these are all wind-pollinated. These crops tend to be grown in large fields and bee-friendly flowers (AKA weeds) are excluded, existing around the borders, roads, and residences if at all. Alfalfa is suitable for leaf-cutter bees, but not for honey bees, much less bumblebees[not true as it turns out]. I would expect that honeybee/bumblebee-suitable flowers would be comparatively rare in most of the farmed countryside.

Might be interesting to compare wild (undeveloped) countryside to farmed, and farmed staple areas to specialty areas such as apple orchards.
In all fairness...

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby commodorejohn » Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:08 am UTC

Sableagle wrote:Same reason there are fewer flies buzzing around in the USA than in Austria: everything's soaked in toxic chemicals.

It's okay, I'm sure Monsanto will come out with a Roundup-resistant strain of bees soon enough. And reasonably-priced, too, no doubt!
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby CorruptUser » Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:18 am UTC

Uhh... glyphosate isn't particularly toxic to anything that isn't a plant, and in terms of human safety it's actually much safer than caffeine (which is, however, extremely toxic to insects and plants). It's neonicotonoids that are killing all the bees.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Sableagle » Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:04 am UTC

commodorejohn wrote:
Sableagle wrote:Same reason there are fewer flies buzzing around in the USA than in Austria: everything's soaked in toxic chemicals.

It's okay, I'm sure Monsanto will come out with a Roundup-resistant strain of bees soon enough. And reasonably-priced, too, no doubt!
They'll only sell colonies with barren queens, though, so we'll have to buy a fresh colony from them every year.


CorruptUser wrote:Uhh... glyphosate isn't particularly toxic to anything that isn't a plant, and in terms of human safety it's actually much safer than caffeine (which is, however, extremely toxic to insects and plants). It's neonicotonoids that are killing all the bees.

Glyphosate was one place where Avaaz and I really disagreed. Studies showed that oral consumption of large amounts of glyphosate may be associated with an increased risk of cancer in rats, so they got it banned. Now, banned from use on food crops I could understand, but when I used glyphosate I wasn't using it to keep a food crop weed-free. I was using it very carefully to get rid of some really stubborn weeds and, once I'd killed them and they'd withered away where they stood, nobody was eating them.

This thing? Glyphosate was the weedkiller we could use on that. It shades out other plants so nothing else grows on the riverbank, then it dies back in autumn so nothing's growing there at all and the riverbank is more susceptible to erosion. It's deadly poisonous to (almost) anything (except sheep for some reason) so it's no damn use. The seeds can stay dormant but viable for seven years so getting rid of it's damn hard. The roots stay viable if they're chopped up, like how you can grow a carrot plant from a carrot stick, so ploughing it into the ground just turns one bit plant into a hundred smaller ones. It's also a host for carrot fly, so in gardens near where it grows, carrots don't. Also, it causes phytophotosensitisation.

Spoilered for images of injuries:
Spoiler:
Image
Image
Image
Image


Anywhere its sap gets on your skin, you get sunburned really, really easily ... for the next few days, weeks, months or, maybe, 15 years. Fall off your bicycle in t-shirt and shorts and crash into one of them aged 8 and you could be graduating from university and looking for a job while still gothed up to cover all the affected areas, having lived the whole scholl -> high school -> college -> university part of your life without ever being able to fit in with the others in any outdoor activity and having to sit away from the windows.

It used to be that a local with some spare cash could get a bottle of glyphosate and a big sprayer with a long lance, mix up a tankful and go out on a still, clear, summer morning to spray those (Russian) bastards along however much length of riverbank one tankful would cover.

Then Avaaz got it banned from sale. Now we can't do anything about it. Well, someone with a full Nomex suit could go and chop it the heck down every three days from March until whenever it stops trying to grow, or maybe someone could get some thermite grenades and roll them into the bases of stands of the stuff, but ... Yeah, not so happy with Avaaz on that one.
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Tyndmyr » Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:35 pm UTC

I mean, generally, if you've decided to drink a glass of weedkiller, you have made a poor life choice. If you're using it even vaguely according to the directions, it's pretty safe. I've used Roundup extensively, and it's really good at what it does.

Among other things, this means spraying is usually a one and done, with fairly modest amounts of chemical use. Other weedkillers often target only specific subsets, and may require multiple applications. That means a lot more spraying in general. Not only is this more costly and time consuming, it means a lot more incidental exposure on average(both to humans and wildlife).

Roundup's really awesome.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby sardia » Fri Jul 06, 2018 1:53 am UTC

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/05/62612369 ... -literally
Many spiders fly long distances by riding "balloons" of silk, and a new study suggests that they're propelled by more than just the wind.
Electric fields at strengths found in nature can also trigger the spiders' ballooning behavior. And electrostatic forces can lift up the spiders even when the air is still, according to a newly published report in the journal Current Biology. Ballooning spiders have long fascinated scientists because they fly high — they've been found more than 2 miles up — and far. These spiders land on ships in the middle of the ocean, and they're often the first colonizers of new volcanic islands, says Erica Morley of the University of Bristol.
"Although they don't have wings, they're actually pretty good at flying,"

"Spiderman, Spiderman, does whatever a spider can
Spins a web any size, electric fields lets them fly
Look out, here comes the Spiderman"

So a spider can somehow detect electric fields, and then use them to fly high into the atmosphere, letting them be the first to colonize newly formed volcanic islands.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby addams » Fri Jul 06, 2018 3:37 am UTC

OK....
You have Triggered all our XKCD Forum Arachnophobes.
As for me....Mildly skeved out. I've seen them do it.

There is no spider free environment.
Not even out on the open Pacific.

Have you ever seen a spider nest mature and hatch?
eeewww....https://www.bing.com/images/search?view ... ajaxhist=0
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Coyne » Fri Jul 06, 2018 4:03 am UTC

sardia wrote:"Spiderman, Spiderman, does whatever a spider can
Spins a web any size, electric fields lets them fly
Look out, here comes the Spiderman"


Original (blame me)...


Spiderweb! Spiderweb!
Spider-man's old spiderweb!
Dangling down!
Everywhere!
Left behind,
Without a care!
To us,
They are completely useless,
And they're a dirty nuisance!
Do something, Spider-man.

Addendum: Yes I know that the Marvel® character design has the webs dissolving. But what if they didn't?
In all fairness...

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Mutex » Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:06 am UTC

Trump Baby cleared for takeoff during Trump's London visit.

Spoiler:
Image

https://news.sky.com/story/trump-angry- ... sf-twitter
A giant balloon dubbed "Trump baby" has been given the green light to fly near parliament during the president's UK visit.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Soupspoon » Fri Jul 06, 2018 11:56 am UTC

sardia wrote:https://www.npr.org/2018/07/05/626123698/when-spiders-go-airborne-it-s-electric-literally
(…)

So a spider can somehow detect electric fields, and then use them to fly high into the atmosphere, letting them be the first to colonize newly formed volcanic islands.

Logic states that if they have had any ability at all of determining the existence of a landing place other than the open sea, to voluntarily surrender their super-pelagic altitude to in a timely manner to escape the high possibility of becoming fish-food (before or after drowning) in their uncounted multitudes then they will hone this ability to a fine art through natural selection…

Yes, if you were adrift in the middle of the ocean, you will likely get inordinately inundated with spiders droppingon your head using their Spider-Senses. A comforting thought, I'm sure you'll agree!

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Drumheller769 » Fri Jul 06, 2018 3:20 pm UTC

So what you are saying is...its better to drown, so they cant get you under the water, right?
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby sardia » Fri Jul 06, 2018 5:15 pm UTC

Drumheller769 wrote:So what you are saying is...its better to drown, so they cant get you under the water, right?

I assumed he was talking about free protein that rains from the sky. You'd need quite a swarm of them to sustain you though.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby CorruptUser » Fri Jul 06, 2018 7:15 pm UTC


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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Sableagle » Fri Jul 06, 2018 7:21 pm UTC

When you start thinking of them as nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency, they become awesome.
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Grop » Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:30 pm UTC

CorruptUser wrote:I don't understand the hatred of spiders. If they were giant and lived in the water, we'd find them delicious.


Also most sea food is scavengers. We don't eat scavengers that don't live underwater, but these are okay.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby CorruptUser » Fri Jul 06, 2018 11:42 pm UTC

Apparently you've never had to deal with chickens. Disgusting creatures, the only domesticated animal that deserves to be factory farmed.

If we need an equally disgusting and mentally deficient mammal for meat, I would recommend replacing the cow with koalas, except those bastards actually are TOO stupid to be farmed.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby sardia » Sat Jul 07, 2018 2:43 am UTC

CorruptUser wrote:Apparently you've never had to deal with chickens. Disgusting creatures, the only domesticated animal that deserves to be factory farmed.

If we need an equally disgusting and mentally deficient mammal for meat, I would recommend replacing the cow with koalas, except those bastards actually are TOO stupid to be farmed.

What did chickens ever do to you?

FYI Cows fed lots of kelp will reduce methane pollution. Lets you keep eating steak for a while longer. At least until too many starving kids demand the farmland for vegetables.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby CorruptUser » Sat Jul 07, 2018 3:24 am UTC

Cows' use of farmland has been vastly exaggerated. Cattle have a feed conversion ratio of between 5 and 7, with American beef being on the lower end due to the efficiency of factory farms. That is, 5 pounds of feed turns into 1 pound of cow. Now that does include the rest of the cow, but that rest still has use as leather, bone char, dog food, more animal feed, etc. Nothing close to the "40+ pounds" always cited by PETA and the like. If you are upset by this and want to make cattle farming more efficient, support things like "pink slime" which extract extra protein from organ meats and thus lower the ratio.

Of course, no one mentions that organic farms rely extensively on factory farmed bullshit in order to maintain respectable yields; if we all went vegan, the organic farms would become vastly less productive. That isn't to say that we shouldn't use shit as fertilizer instead of dumping it in the river, of course.

Chickens are much more efficient, with feed conversion ratios below 2, with again, factory farms being the lowest.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby addams » Sat Jul 07, 2018 4:11 am UTC

sardia wrote:https://www.npr.org/2018/07/05/626123698/when-spiders-go-airborne-it-s-electric-literally
Many spiders fly long distances by riding "balloons" of silk, and a new study suggests that they're propelled by more than just the wind.
Electric fields at strengths found in nature can also trigger the spiders' ballooning behavior. And electrostatic forces can lift up the spiders even when the air is still, according to a newly published report in the journal Current Biology. Ballooning spiders have long fascinated scientists because they fly high — they've been found more than 2 miles up — and far. These spiders land on ships in the middle of the ocean, and they're often the first colonizers of new volcanic islands, says Erica Morley of the University of Bristol.
"Although they don't have wings, they're actually pretty good at flying,"

"Spiderman, Spiderman, does whatever a spider can
Spins a web any size, electric fields lets them fly
Look out, here comes the Spiderman"

So a spider can somehow detect electric fields, and then use them to fly high into the atmosphere, letting them be the first to colonize newly formed volcanic islands.
I re-read that, while awake.
The researchers can make the spiders rise and fall by flipping the switch.

How this is going to be useful, I can not guess.
There must be something coming. Not spiders.

Maybe the WingSuit People will be able to use atmospheric charge to prolong their flights.
Or; In (X) number of years, children will transport via sail and atmospheric electricity.

"Bye-Bye! Go see GrandMa!"
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Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
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Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby commodorejohn » Sat Jul 07, 2018 7:57 am UTC

Sableagle wrote:When you start thinking of them as nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency and then dedicate themselves to converting disease-carrying insects into more nanotech machines that disperse to optimise their own efficiency, they become awesome.

On the other hand, we have bats and dragonflies for this job, neither are ever venomous, and both are significantly less prone to trying to set up shop in my bathroom.

The web thing is pretty cool though.
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Sableagle » Sat Jul 07, 2018 8:19 am UTC

CorruptUser wrote:Cows' use of farmland has been vastly exaggerated. Cattle have a feed conversion ratio of between 5 and 7, with American beef being on the lower end due to the efficiency of factory farms. That is, 5 pounds of feed turns into 1 pound of cow. Now that does include the rest of the cow, but that rest still has use as leather, bone char, dog food, more animal feed, etc. Nothing close to the "40+ pounds" always cited by PETA and the like. If you are upset by this and want to make cattle farming more efficient, support things like "pink slime" which extract extra protein from organ meats and thus lower the ratio.

Of course, no one mentions that organic farms rely extensively on factory farmed bullshit in order to maintain respectable yields; if we all went vegan, the organic farms would become vastly less productive. That isn't to say that we shouldn't use shit as fertilizer instead of dumping it in the river, of course.

Chickens are much more efficient, with feed conversion ratios below 2, with again, factory farms being the lowest.


How much water do cows drink per day? (July 19, 2016)

Daily water intake may vary from 3 to 30 gallons per day depending on age, body size (weight), stage of production, and the environment (mainly air temperature).
As a rule of thumb, consumption will range from 1 gallon per 100 pounds of body weight during cold weather to nearly 2 gallons per 100 pounds of body during the hottest weather.
Lactating cows require nearly twice as much water compared to dry cows.
Clean fresh water free of manure, dirt, and other debris is important.

Dr. Rick Rasby
Professor of Animal Science


As the UK swelters under a summer heatwave, the nation’s gardeners are sweating more than most.

Lawns across the country are as parched and arid as the Serengeti, roses are wilting and allotment lettuces crying out for rain.

To make matters worse, Britain’s water companies have now declared the year’s first hosepipe ban, rendering it illegal for householders to water the grass in order to prevent vital reserves from drying up in the drought.

Where is it?

The first ban of 2018 has been activated in Northern Ireland, coming into effect at 6pm on Friday 29 June and permitting residents to use the taps solely for drinking, cooking and washing.


Cape Town is approaching drought ‘Day Zero’, and climate change could be to blame

The city is edging closer to a day – known locally as “Day Zero” – when supplies are so low authorities will have to cut off water to three quarters of the population.

Far from being a hypothetical scenario, Day Zero has a set date. It is currently expected on 9 July.


The in-depth assessment presented in this document of the various significant impacts of the world’s livestock sector on the environment is deliberately termed Livestock’s long shadow so as to help raise the attention of both the technical and the general public to the very substantial contribution of animal agriculture to climate change and air pollution, to land, soil and water degradation and to the reduction of biodiversity. This is not done simply to blame the rapidly growing and intensifying global livestock sector for severely damaging the environment but to encourage decisive measures at the technical and political levels for mitigating such damage.

It is obvious that the responsibility for the necessary action to address the environmental damage by the livestock sector goes far beyond the sector; it also goes beyond agriculture. While the sector, and agriculture as a whole, have to live up to the challenge of finding suitable technical solutions for more environmentally sustainable resource use in animal agriculture, the decisions concerning their use clearly transcend agriculture; multisector and multiobjective decision-making is required.

Livestock also affect the carbon balance of land used for pasture or feedcrops, and thus indirectly contribute to releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. The same happens when forest is cleared for pastures. In addition, greenhouse gases are emitted from fossil fuel used in the production process, from feed production to processing and marketing of livestock products. Some of the indirect effects are difficult to estimate, as land use related emissions vary widely, depending on biophysical factors as soil, vegetation and climate as well as on human practices.

The respiration of livestock makes up only a very small part of the net release of carbon that can be attributed to the livestock sector. Much
more is released indirectly by other channels including:
•burning fossil fuel to produce mineral fertilizers used in feed production;
•methane release from the breakdown of fertilizers and from animal manure;
•land-use changes for feed production and for grazing;
•land degradation;
•fossil fuel use during feed and animal production; and
•fossil fuel use in production and transport of processed and refrigerated animal products.

Freshwater resources are unequally distributed at the global level. More than 2.3 billion people in 21 countries live in water-stressed basins (having between 1 000 and 1 700 m3 per person per year). Some 1.7 billion people live in basins under scarcity conditions (with less than 1 000 m3 per person per year) see Map 28, Annex 1 (Rosegrant, Cai and Cline, 2002; Kinje, 2001; Bernstein, 2002; Brown, 2002). More than one billion people do not have sufficient access to clean water. Much of the world’s human population growth and agricultural expansion is taking place in water stressed regions.


... and I just found an article about this, under which someone commented that cholesterol is good for you and vegetables don't contain amino acids.

I think we've made commenting on newspaper articles too easy.
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby addams » Sat Jul 07, 2018 5:10 pm UTC

Sable;....
That's not funny.
I didn't get a Smile, leave alone a Giggle.

I come here for those oh, so common Stupid and Funny Human Tricks.
Like the moving cones to drive near SinkHoles. Oh! The Self Confidence!
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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Sableagle » Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:01 pm UTC

addams wrote:Sable;....
That's not funny.
I didn't get a Smile, leave alone a Giggle.

I come here for those oh, so common Stupid and Funny Human Tricks.
Like the moving cones to drive near SinkHoles. Oh! The Self Confidence!

Moving the climate debates and emissions commitments to drive us all near one hell of a sinkhole is just a bit too serious to be funny, eh?

"Vegetables often don't contain amino acids" is like "Metals often don't contain neutrons" or "untreated springwater often doesn't contain any oxygen nucleii" or maybe ... "foreign figure-skaters often don't have digestive tracts."
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby addams » Sat Jul 07, 2018 11:38 pm UTC

Sableagle wrote:"Vegetables often don't contain amino acids" is like "Metals often don't contain neutrons" or "untreated springwater often doesn't contain any oxygen nucleii" or maybe ... "foreign figure-skaters often don't have digestive tracts."
oh,...well,...When you put it That way, it does get a bit funnier.
(sigh..) Poor you; Having to explain the Joke.

I think, I understand.
Vegetables often don't contain essential amino acids.

Essential amino acids can not be made in our guts.
They must have, at the very least, component parts supplied.
Spoiler:
The nine essential amino acids are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lycine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.


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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Mutex » Tue Jul 10, 2018 12:55 pm UTC

Seems a little unfair to blame the stork for that.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Soupspoon » Tue Jul 10, 2018 2:17 pm UTC


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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Zamfir » Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:58 am UTC

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/373/1753/20170239
A study of offices that were changed to open-plan layout. Conclusion: face to face communications drops off a cliff, email communication goes way up.

Pretty much the opposite of what such changes are supposed to accomplish. Assuming that the goal was not simply to put more chairs in the same space.

Article remarks that we have really no clue at all how collaborative work actually works.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Mutex » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:15 am UTC

I wonder how that works. Maybe being in an open, noisy environment makes people feel less secure so they go out of their way to reduce further contact and "close up" a lot. While people in cubicles feel more secure and are more willing to initiate contact with other people.

I guess increased usage of social media is because people find it harder to concentrate on anything.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby speising » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:24 am UTC

i don't find this surprising at all. it's easy to go over to a colleague's office to chat, but when there a 20 other people around, you'll want to keep noise level to a minimum, and 10 parallel conversations are a little bit distracting.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Zamfir » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:05 am UTC

Yeah, it's not surprising. But clearly not obvious either. After all, lots of organizations do change offices to open-plan with the expectation of easier communication.

I've never understood the American love for (or at least, acceptance of ) cubicles. Open-plan offices at least have the fig leaf f the Philosophy of Breaking Down the Walls. It might actually be cost-cutting, but you can pretend. Cubicles are just a raised middle finger from higher management.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Mutex » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:17 am UTC

I'd much prefer to have a cubicle. What don't you like about them?

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Zamfir » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:40 am UTC

Lack of light. Noise from too many people in one room. Difficult to have sensitive conversations. Often impossible to regulate the temperature to your own preference. Usually goes together with small space, though of course you can cram too many people in an office as well. The creepy feeling that someone could be watching over your shoulder, if the space is designed that the walkway is directly behind your back.

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Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Postby Mutex » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:50 am UTC

Well, other than the lack of daylight you get all those things with open plan too. Which is the only other option I've seen, in fact the ONLY kind of office I've worked in. Cubicles at least muffle the sound of other conversations and give people a little more privacy.

What other office layouts have you worked in? Did everyone get their own office or something?


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