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Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 4:32 pm UTC
by Muz
Clinton was never impeached. He never even had an impeachment hearing, IIRC.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 4:49 pm UTC
by hetas
Kennebrek wrote:A couple of years ago, an intelligent, well-educated ten-year-old boy needed my help to operate a rotary-dial telephone. We're past that point.

I'm already trying to figure out how I'll explain to children in the future what life was like before the internet.

I cant't even explain to myself how we lived before the internet.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:04 pm UTC
by TomRobbins
Kennebrek wrote:I'm already trying to figure out how I'll explain to children in the future what life was like before the internet.


I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:10 pm UTC
by Jorpho
TomRobbins wrote:I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?
I understand there was a lot more drinking.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:48 pm UTC
by jpers36
Muz wrote:Clinton was never impeached. He never even had an impeachment hearing, IIRC.


Clinton was impeached on December 19, 1998. He was acquitted in the impeachment trial.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:53 pm UTC
by KarenRei
Jorpho wrote:
TomRobbins wrote:I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?
I understand there was a lot more drinking.


Don't know about that. The Nordic countries both some of the world's highest broadband penetration rates *and* some of the world's highest drinking rates.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 6:43 pm UTC
by Moose Anus
2036 is Nevar.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 6:44 pm UTC
by Moose Anus
TomRobbins wrote:
Kennebrek wrote:I'm already trying to figure out how I'll explain to children in the future what life was like before the internet.


I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?
There was a lot of TV watching involved.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 6:45 pm UTC
by PolakoVoador
KarenRei wrote:
Jorpho wrote:
TomRobbins wrote:I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?
I understand there was a lot more drinking.


Don't know about that. The Nordic countries both some of the world's highest broadband penetration rates *and* some of the world's highest drinking rates.


Yes they drink a lot now. But that doesn't change the fact the they drank even more back in de old days of Internetlessness :mrgreen:

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 7:17 pm UTC
by punto
I don't get it, is he saying that I'll be dead when I'm ~50 (according to the US Census Bureau) ?

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 7:39 pm UTC
by TomRobbins
punto wrote:I don't get it, is he saying that I'll be dead when I'm ~50 (according to the US Census Bureau) ?


No, he's saying when you're 50 you will be in the minority of Americans who have a memory of the year-corresponding event.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 7:54 pm UTC
by Pfhorrest
TomRobbins wrote:
Kennebrek wrote:I'm already trying to figure out how I'll explain to children in the future what life was like before the internet.


I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?

I'm 30 and don't remember life before the internet, but then that's because I've been on the internet since I was 10 and life before that mostly involved running around mountains and beaches playing and not having to do anything we use the internet for today.

A big one for me is maps and addresses. There are lots of places in my own (pretty small) town I just don't know how to get to by heart, even if I knew the street address for them. With the internet, I punch in the name who or whatever I'm trying to reach, memorize a couple of turns and landmarks on the resulting map that comes up, and head off. (Or if I had one of them new-fangled smart phones, just get in my car and ask it to read me directions as I go). Pre-internet, I guess I would have had to flip through a huge book full of names and addresses trying to find who or whatever I wanted to reach, and then pull out a box of maps and pore over them looking for the obscure little street I've never had reason to drive down, figure out how best to get to that street from where I am, and then memorize the turns and landmarks and head off. And that's presuming I have a phone book and map for the city I'm in; what if I'm traveling?

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:05 pm UTC
by da Doctah
peewee_RotA wrote:
AvatarIII wrote:
Quicksilver wrote:
AvatarIII wrote:
Ideas sleep furiously. wrote:I will never forget Hammertime.


i blame the fact there was an MC Hammer animated series.
CHALLENGE ACCEPTED

I've been looking for some strange 90's cartoons, and after Toxic Crusaders, this seems right up my alley.


Toxic Crusaders was awesome, another one for you could be ProStars starring Michael Jordan, Bo Jackson, and Wayne Gretzky


For obscure 90's cartoons, nothing beats the Mighty Ducks in space. So stupid it almost made me want to launch actual ducks into space in protest.


I see your Mighty Ducks and raise you The Brothers Grunt.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:18 pm UTC
by Jorpho
Moose Anus wrote:
TomRobbins wrote:
Kennebrek wrote:I'm already trying to figure out how I'll explain to children in the future what life was like before the internet.
I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?
There was a lot of TV watching involved.
Aie, how much time did I lose watching Family Matters, Fresh Prince, and The Simpsons? And how much of that time was reruns? (It wasn't Full House, at least.)

Posting on message boards is so much more productive.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:39 pm UTC
by KrytenKoro
BAReFOOt wrote:
da Doctah wrote:(Illustration: how many people who have served in the military have forgotten why Jane Fonda is considered evil?)


Did she dare to oppose organized professional mass-murder, or what? :P

....no, that's not why they were pissed.

Also during the course of her visit, Fonda visited American prisoners of war (POWs), and brought back messages from them to their families. When cases of torture began to emerge among POWs returning to the United States, Fonda called the returning POWs "hypocrites and liars".


That's why they're pissed, and for damn good reason. She decided that she knew what was going on better than anyone who had actually had to spend time there, then denounced victims of torture as liars. Being anti-war is one thing, being human filth is another.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 9:47 pm UTC
by Jonesthe Spy
And yet the American South still holds a grudge over Sherman's March, Texas refuses to forget the Alamo, Serbians clung to some military defeat centuries past as a reason to control Kosovo, and some stories from thousands of years ago in the Old Testament made a bunch of Russians and other Europeans think that had some inherent right to take over Palestine. Funny, innit?

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:13 pm UTC
by madchild
Wow, this is a completely crazy perspective to me. The are still people alive that remember the existence of the Soviet Union? I think of this stuff as ancient history, not something that happened to real people. I guess I can look forward to seeing this kind of stuff happen in my lifetime. Or maybe it already has and I haven't even noticed. (Also: How soon do you think people will forget about Justin Bieber?)

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:20 pm UTC
by rmsgrey
Pfhorrest wrote:A big one for me is maps and addresses. There are lots of places in my own (pretty small) town I just don't know how to get to by heart, even if I knew the street address for them. With the internet, I punch in the name who or whatever I'm trying to reach, memorize a couple of turns and landmarks on the resulting map that comes up, and head off. (Or if I had one of them new-fangled smart phones, just get in my car and ask it to read me directions as I go). Pre-internet, I guess I would have had to flip through a huge book full of names and addresses trying to find who or whatever I wanted to reach, and then pull out a box of maps and pore over them looking for the obscure little street I've never had reason to drive down, figure out how best to get to that street from where I am, and then memorize the turns and landmarks and head off. And that's presuming I have a phone book and map for the city I'm in; what if I'm traveling?


When it comes to navigation, digital maps are an evolution of pre-existing techniques - the interface is different, but the skills for using it are the same as for paper maps. GPS and SatNav are revolutionary - the former frees you from having to be able to figure out where you are to begin with; the latter from having to make any decisions about your route.

For myself, I use Google Maps for planning, but the only time I use satnav to get somewhere is if someone else is driving...

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 11:29 pm UTC
by DanD
The Challenger Disaster is the earliest clearly datable memory I have.

Of course I seem to remember a dishwasher my parents swear they got rid of when I was three, but I can't put a real date on that.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 11:33 pm UTC
by Pfhorrest
rmsgrey wrote:When it comes to navigation, digital maps are an evolution of pre-existing techniques - the interface is different, but the skills for using it are the same as for paper maps. GPS and SatNav are revolutionary - the former frees you from having to be able to figure out where you are to begin with; the latter from having to make any decisions about your route.

I think without even GPS or SatNav, digital maps have a huge advantage over paper maps (which it occurs to me is generally an advantage of most digital vs paper equivalents): it is searchable. That was my point with getting directions to obscure places, even if I have a map that covers that area. If I need to stop by some shop at 13B Obscure Ln., My Town, USA, the old fashioned way I'd have to figure out what the hell part of town Obscure Lane is even in, out of the hundreds of tiny streets in town, and THEN figure out how to get there. With Google Maps, I just punch in "13B Obscure Ln" and it shows me exactly where that is. I could then use old-fashioned map skills to figure out the best way to get from where I am to there, but it will usually do me the courtesy of suggesting one for me. This comes in most handy when I am somewhere other than my own home town, where every address may as well be 13B Obscure Ln. since I have no familiarity with even the major streets in a strange town.

Also helps a ton that the phone book is integrated into the map, so I don't even need to know that Mom & Pop's Shop is at 13B Obscure Ln., I just need to search for Mom & Pop's shop, and I will know that that is at 13B Obscure Ln., where the hell 13B Obscure Ln. is, and a suggestion for how to get there.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:05 am UTC
by hamjudo
Pfhorrest wrote:
rmsgrey wrote:When it comes to navigation, digital maps are an evolution of pre-existing techniques - the interface is different, but the skills for using it are the same as for paper maps. GPS and SatNav are revolutionary - the former frees you from having to be able to figure out where you are to begin with; the latter from having to make any decisions about your route.

I think without even GPS or SatNav, digital maps have a huge advantage over paper maps (which it occurs to me is generally an advantage of most digital vs paper equivalents): it is searchable. That was my point with getting directions to obscure places, even if I have a map that covers that area. If I need to stop by some shop at 13B Obscure Ln., My Town, USA, the old fashioned way I'd have to figure out what the hell part of town Obscure Lane is even in, out of the hundreds of tiny streets in town, and THEN figure out how to get there. With Google Maps, I just punch in "13B Obscure Ln" and it shows me exactly where that is. I could then use old-fashioned map skills to figure out the best way to get from where I am to there, but it will usually do me the courtesy of suggesting one for me. This comes in most handy when I am somewhere other than my own home town, where every address may as well be 13B Obscure Ln. since I have no familiarity with even the major streets in a strange town.

Also helps a ton that the phone book is integrated into the map, so I don't even need to know that Mom & Pop's Shop is at 13B Obscure Ln., I just need to search for Mom & Pop's shop, and I will know that that is at 13B Obscure Ln., where the hell 13B Obscure Ln. is, and a suggestion for how to get there.


There were letters running down the side of maps, numbers along the top, forming a grid. There would be an index of street names with grid coordinates. A few of the better maps even keyed the index by house numbers. So you would see that Obscure Ln house numbers 100-1332 were in D-24, house number 1333-2456 in C-24, etc... So you flip the map over, and look for "D" along the side, then find 24 at the top. Then you would go horizontally across from the D with one finger, then run the other finger down from the 24. You would then search in the box until you found Obscure Ln.

Another clever thing we used to do was buy a map whenever we would be spending time in a new town. For those who could plan ahead, AAA could get a map for any city anywhere in the US or Canada. The rest of us bought them when we got to the town. Every gas station, convenience store, and grocery store sold local maps.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:21 am UTC
by Paulmichael
rmsgrey wrote:
da Doctah wrote:Ross and Rachel getting back together


Which time?


Wait, who? What celebrity couple is that? Not that I know any to begin with anyway...

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:26 am UTC
by blowfishhootie
Muz wrote:Clinton was never impeached. He never even had an impeachment hearing, IIRC.


You remember incorrectly. Clinton was impeached and went before the Senate charged with obstruction and with perjury. Whichever of the two got more votes, I think obstruction, came about 15 votes short of conviction. A two-thirds majority vote was required for removal from office. Impeachment is simply being charged at all, it does not imply removal from office.

EDIT: Wikipedia says 50 Senators voted guilty on obstruction, 45 voted guilty on perjury. It would have taken 67 votes on either to remove Clinton from the White House.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:31 am UTC
by Mirkwood
da Doctah wrote:(Illustration: how many people who have served in the military have forgotten why Jane Fonda is considered evil?)


At the risk of answering a rhetorical question, it's because she was not just against the Vietnam war but actually supportive of the Viet Cong. She said their treatment of prisoners wasn't as bad as people made it out to be, and took pictures with them. (And I haven't even served in the military yet.)

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:48 am UTC
by San Fran Sam
You want to know what's really scary?

The big headline in 2079....

Spoiler:
Last Baby Boomer dies.

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 1:20 am UTC
by Jorpho
hamjudo wrote:There were letters running down the side of maps, numbers along the top, forming a grid. There would be an index of street names with grid coordinates. A few of the better maps even keyed the index by house numbers. So you would see that Obscure Ln house numbers 100-1332 were in D-24, house number 1333-2456 in C-24, etc... So you flip the map over, and look for "D" along the side, then find 24 at the top. Then you would go horizontally across from the D with one finger, then run the other finger down from the 24. You would then search in the box until you found Obscure Ln.
Good $deity, do you mean to imply people don't know this anymore? :shock:

Another clever thing we used to do was buy a map whenever we would be spending time in a new town. For those who could plan ahead, AAA could get a map for any city anywhere in the US or Canada.
They also offered something called "triptiks", which were basically convenient little flipbook-style direction maps.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 3:53 am UTC
by BizarreFoodie
This should be a wakeup call to everyone. What we hold so dear and find so important doesn't mean squat even to the next generation. All the politics, all the competition, all the hate is nothing.
Should we vote for one or the other candidate? Does anyone remember who ran against President Taft? Does anyone even remember President Taft? I think he was the one that got stuck in the Whitehouse tub.
Who do we like? Who do we hate? What did the next person do to wrong us? It's all so immaterial; everything we do or are will be forgotten within (at most) two generations. The attack on Pearl Harbor was a terrible thing, and some people still have feelings of hate against the Japanese. The invasion of Rome by the barbarian tribes, however, seems almost laughable to people nowadays. "That was sooooo long ago."
Likewise, religion is no excuse; we've been killing each other in the name of heaven for well over 3,000 years. I'm sure we'll find a lot of blood-thirsty SOB's when our time comes.
Mankind is screwed. The intelligent, peaceful people can never take up arms against the testosterone-filled maniacs, and that will be our downfall. If we do, we will become the testosterone-driven maniacs ourselves.
There's no winning this "war," it was lost before it started.
Live, and make all people feel welcome.
That's our only hope.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:51 am UTC
by CatOfGrey
BAReFOOt wrote:Who is that “CUNTON”, that Randall keeps mentioning?


It is also a Shiboleet of sorts, which not-so-secretly identifies people as typeface nazis.

Alternative: a Unix command that improves kerning on command line text.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:20 am UTC
by maydayp
in my oppinion some of those things have already been forgotten by most of the population, or will be forgotten years earlier then thought.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 7:56 am UTC
by 22tcp
Tyris and Cortle wrote:Eh, most of this stuff didn't seem important enough to commit to memory anyway.

Cool. I was in need of support for this: any given international news event will not stay in the head of an average us citizen comparable to the entity quoted above (yes I know you just meant the list was crap - feel wrongly cited/misjudged, please) for more than 5 seconds after actually not listening to the reporter in the news that disturb the soap/reality crapshow/sports event/whatevva it was consuming half-assedly. Also I postulate attention span and long term memory abilities will drop further and further while having networked multimedia devices around running 24/7 with advertisement being half or more of the content. But around 2048* short and long term memory will be transferred to external storage chips with neurolink interfacing so we'll be cool again until someone thinks it'd be even cooler to network this. But I am getting ahead of you. Or me. Damn neurochips.

*insert your favourite sf near future date

:evil: :twisted: :evil: :twisted:

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 8:09 am UTC
by TokenFrenchDude
Very nice comic !
I'd like to do the same kind of thing, but for another country... How is it calculated ? Simply year of x + y years ?

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 12:06 pm UTC
by OrangeJuice
Right, why are we only talking about Americans? It's funny how often I see the word Americans used in place of 'people'.

(This might have made more sense if the events uniquely concerned the US, but that's not the case, with the Berlin wall and Princess Diana mentioned in it.)

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:01 pm UTC
by jpers36
BizarreFoodie wrote:This should be a wakeup call to everyone. What we hold so dear and find so important doesn't mean squat even to the next generation. All the politics, all the competition, all the hate is nothing.
Should we vote for one or the other candidate? Does anyone remember who ran against President Taft? Does anyone even remember President Taft? I think he was the one that got stuck in the Whitehouse tub.
Who do we like? Who do we hate? What did the next person do to wrong us? It's all so immaterial; everything we do or are will be forgotten within (at most) two generations. The attack on Pearl Harbor was a terrible thing, and some people still have feelings of hate against the Japanese. The invasion of Rome by the barbarian tribes, however, seems almost laughable to people nowadays. "That was sooooo long ago."
Likewise, religion is no excuse; we've been killing each other in the name of heaven for well over 3,000 years. I'm sure we'll find a lot of blood-thirsty SOB's when our time comes.
Mankind is screwed. The intelligent, peaceful people can never take up arms against the testosterone-filled maniacs, and that will be our downfall. If we do, we will become the testosterone-driven maniacs ourselves.
There's no winning this "war," it was lost before it started.
Live, and make all people feel welcome.
That's our only hope.


Those who cannot remember the past ...

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:09 pm UTC
by Rhombix
Luckily, as Randall has already pointed out in this comic, there are at least two events in American history that will never be forgotten...

Re: in the days of the comet

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:42 pm UTC
by Nooska
PolakoVoador wrote:
KarenRei wrote:
Jorpho wrote:
TomRobbins wrote:I'm 27 and I don't know what life was like before the internet. Want to practice explaining on this child?
I understand there was a lot more drinking.


Don't know about that. The Nordic countries both some of the world's highest broadband penetration rates *and* some of the world's highest drinking rates.


Yes they drink a lot now. But that doesn't change the fact the they drank even more back in de old days of Internetlessness :mrgreen:


Actually everytime they do a study, drinking has gone up among youths (and remain stagnant for everyone else)...

We can therfore by means of correlation, determine that Higher broadband speed = more alcohol consumed (woe be the day we all have personal fiber-optic connections)

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:44 pm UTC
by bmonk
Muz wrote:Clinton was never impeached. He never even had an impeachment hearing, IIRC.


Bill Clinton was impeached by the House of Representatives on two charges, one of perjury and one of obstruction of justice, on December 19, 1998. Two other impeachment articles, a second perjury charge and a charge of abuse of power, failed. The charges arose from the Lewinsky scandal and the Paula Jones lawsuit.

Clinton was acquitted by the Senate on February 12, 1999. With a two-thirds majority required for conviction (i.e., 67 senators), 50 senators (out of 100) voted guilty on the obstruction charge and 45 on the perjury charge. The Senate was 17 votes short of removing Clinton from office on the former charge in the Senate.

Not only was he impeached, he was tried, and acquitted.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:48 pm UTC
by bmonk
jpers36 wrote:
BizarreFoodie wrote:This should be a wakeup call to everyone. What we hold so dear and find so important doesn't mean squat even to the next generation. All the politics, all the competition, all the hate is nothing.
. . .


Those who cannot remember the past ...



"Are condemned to repeat "American History" class.
--my 11th Grade History Teacher.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 7:54 pm UTC
by da Doctah
CatOfGrey wrote:
BAReFOOt wrote:Who is that “CUNTON”, that Randall keeps mentioning?


It is also a Shiboleet of sorts, which not-so-secretly identifies people as typeface nazis.

Alternative: a Unix command that improves kerning on command line text.


CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt. CUNTON: apply directly to the cunt.

Just how long, O Best Beloved, before we can forget about the commercial that gave us that?

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 9:08 pm UTC
by Max™
San Fran Sam wrote:You want to know what's really scary?

The big headline in 2079....

Spoiler:
Last Baby Boomer dies.

What a glorious day it will be.

No offense to those of you in that group/with nice parents in that group, but the boomers suck harder than a supermassive black hole.


He also left off the Y2K panic, Challenger is my earliest specifically dated memory, it's the day I stopped saying I wanted to be a rocket scientist and moved to physicist.

Re: 1093: "Forget"

Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 10:36 pm UTC
by boXd
I sometimes wonder if the increased pace at which technology advances and we get new 'stuff' makes us feel old and nostalgic increasingly faster. I'm only 19, and even I can remember that only ten years ago there were plenty of people who didn't even have internet access. :shock: *sits in nostalgic trance for a moment* I doubt people would've felt nostalgic when they were 19 in the Stone Age.

"Ugh, brothers. Remember day when no fire we had, I can."