2165: "Millennials"

This forum is for the individual discussion thread that goes with each new comic.

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

User avatar
Moose Anus
Posts: 443
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 10:12 pm UTC

2165: "Millennials"

Postby Moose Anus » Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:05 pm UTC

Image
Title text: Ironically, I've been having these same arguments for at least a decade now. I thought we would have moved on by now, but somehow the snide complaints about millennials continue.

Huh, and here I thought, "I'm just saying," was a millennial thing.
Lemonade? ...Aww, ok.

User avatar
Keyman
Posts: 340
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2014 1:56 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Keyman » Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:28 pm UTC

Pew Research study separates them this way.
The Silent Generation: Born 1928-1945
Baby Boomers: Born 1946-1964
Generation X: Born 1965-1980
Millennials: Born 1981-1996
Post-Millennials: Born 1997-Present

I believe the Millennials are also "Generation Y' and "Post-Millennials" are "Generation Z"

Arthur Fonzarelli is the only member of Gen Ay-y-y-y...
I'm just sayin'.
Last edited by Keyman on Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:39 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
Nothing could be more ill-judged than that intolerant spirit which has, at all times, characterized political parties. - A. Hamilton

User avatar
Flumble
Yes Man
Posts: 2264
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:35 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Flumble » Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:34 pm UTC

Randall should get off his prescriptivist horse. Right now millennial just means anyone young in my circles, with a possible backformed etymology that it means anyone born this millennium. (Which, by the way, started in 2000 because the first millennium took 999 years.) I bet that by 2032 we'll be too far from the start of the millennium to call kids "millennials" so "millennial" will become "old people" to the youth.

chenille
Posts: 430
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:25 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby chenille » Wed Jun 19, 2019 3:56 pm UTC

Millennial pretends to mean a particular generation, but really it's just a way of saying "kids today" without quite owning up to being the sort of person who would say that.

mihipte
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2015 4:55 am UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby mihipte » Wed Jun 19, 2019 4:10 pm UTC

I'm with Randal on this one, but then I have marked prescriptivist tendencies. If there's a recognizable authority that defined a word, that's generally the meaning I will insist on.

Incidentally, I am a Millennial who could feasibly be caught talking about "kids today." I don't think I've ever encountered this class of people who get the terms confused.

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 5480
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Jun 19, 2019 4:45 pm UTC

My girlfriend and I are the same generation (Millennials), as is her brother, but her sister is the previous generation (X), and one of her sister's kids is our generation, but the other kid is the next generation (Z).

Generations are weird.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

aljohnso
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:17 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby aljohnso » Wed Jun 19, 2019 5:45 pm UTC

Had a discussion about such things with my son - it appeared as if he was a bit fuzzy on it as well, for all of his 16 years.

Personally - think what would happen if all of the Millennials voted for Trump - I think I mean that everyone needs to chill and let people find their own way... They aren't likely to do a worse job than we non-millennial types have.

drazen
Posts: 92
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 12:35 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby drazen » Wed Jun 19, 2019 5:47 pm UTC

Keyman wrote:Pew Research study separates them this way.
The Silent Generation: Born 1928-1945
Baby Boomers: Born 1946-1964
Generation X: Born 1965-1980
Millennials: Born 1981-1996
Post-Millennials: Born 1997-Present

I believe the Millennials are also "Generation Y' and "Post-Millennials" are "Generation Z"

Arthur Fonzarelli is the only member of Gen Ay-y-y-y...
I'm just sayin'.


I must take a bit of issue with PEW. For me, Millenials were the first kids to be high school age or younger with really widespread broadband/DSL. Sure, those things existed in the early 90's, but they didn't really take off until right around... the millenium. Hence the name, for me. 1981 seems a little young to me for a Millenial, as they'd be graduating high school right around the time the tech bubble took off. 1981-1984 seems like it could go either way, depending on where and how you grew up.

Also, I'm Gen X. We make snide and snarky complaints about everybody!

Justin Lardinois
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2015 4:47 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Justin Lardinois » Wed Jun 19, 2019 6:44 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:Right now millennial just means anyone young in my circles


When it's used like that, it means "anyone young that I don't like." The word is only used in a value-neutral way when discussing a specific generation.

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 5480
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Jun 19, 2019 6:53 pm UTC

Millennials are those who came of age around the start of the new millennium. So the ur-Millennials are people born around 1982-1983, who turned 18 in 2000-2001, allowing for ambiguity on when the millennium started. A generation generally being about two decades, and "come of age" being a bit of a vague term, we can then say that Millennials are roughly those born in the 80s and 90s, with some fuzz around the edges.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

User avatar
Keyman
Posts: 340
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2014 1:56 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Keyman » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:13 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:Millennials are those who came of age around the start of the new millennium. So the ur-Millennials are people born around 1982-1983, who turned 18 in 2000-2001, allowing for ambiguity on when the millennium started. A generation generally being about two decades, and "come of age" being a bit of a vague term, we can then say that Millennials are roughly those born in the 80s and 90s, with some fuzz around the edges.
I thought the ones with "some fuzz around the edgeers were the hipsters?
Nothing could be more ill-judged than that intolerant spirit which has, at all times, characterized political parties. - A. Hamilton

TV4Fun
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:45 am UTC
Location: Certifiable C++ Programmer

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby TV4Fun » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:15 pm UTC

Sorry, millennials definitely do not include people born in 1996. If you've never blown dust out of a game cartridge, you're not a millennial.
$_[0] wrote:rule 2:
Once a relationship ends, physical access to all relevant machinery is denied.

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 5480
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:30 pm UTC

You realize that every generation has very different people at opposite ends of it, right? People born in the early 60s vs the late 70s are as different as people born in the early 80s vs the late 90s. For example, late 70s kids probably blew in game cartridges at some point (being teens at the height of that technology), while early 60s kids probably never did (being in their 30s at that same time), but those are both Generation X.

The Millennial generation likewise currently contains both teenagers and 30-somethings, who are going to be very different, but that's what generations are like.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

ijuin
Posts: 1150
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:02 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby ijuin » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:38 pm UTC

Being born in 1980 myself, I’d call a Millennial anybody old enough to remember the time before smart phones but not old enough to remember the time before desktop computers.

User avatar
doogly
Dr. The Juggernaut of Touching Himself
Posts: 5538
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 2:31 am UTC
Location: Lexington, MA
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby doogly » Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:25 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:The Millennial generation likewise currently contains both teenagers and 30-somethings, who are going to be very different, but that's what generations are like.

That's why this sort of binning was better when we had big wars that caused fewer births at the margins. You can discretize the folks born right before and right after WWII nicely, and the folks born during are just less of a cultural presence. It makes life easy. Gen X born in an after-boom is nice, but it's now really rolling generations. The binning is much weirder now.

The only solution? Let's start a war. Let's start a nuclear war.
LE4dGOLEM: What's a Doug?
Noc: A larval Doogly. They grow the tail and stinger upon reaching adulthood.

Keep waggling your butt brows Brothers.
Or; Is that your eye butthairs?

JudeMorrigan
Posts: 1266
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:26 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby JudeMorrigan » Wed Jun 19, 2019 8:52 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:You realize that every generation has very different people at opposite ends of it, right? People born in the early 60s vs the late 70s are as different as people born in the early 80s vs the late 90s. For example, late 70s kids probably blew in game cartridges at some point (being teens at the height of that technology), while early 60s kids probably never did (being in their 30s at that same time), but those are both Generation X.

The Millennial generation likewise currently contains both teenagers and 30-somethings, who are going to be very different, but that's what generations are like.

As was pointed out, Pew Research snaps the chalk line at 1996. Nielsen and a few others have similar definitions. So there are at least some definitions of millenials that no longer include any teenagers.

And speaking as a late-70s baby, I always liked the "Generation Nintento" mini-cohort some people carve out. (I've seen it called a couple of different things. But I like that name since you'd better believe that I blew on my Nintendo cartridges.) In a lot of ways, I feel like I have far more in common with millennials than older Gen X types, but ... I had a fully internet free childhood. I mean, it obviously existed, but it wasn't anything like mainstream. I remember getting my first exposure to the world wide web in my high school physics classroom. That admittedly makes for a fairly profound difference.

User avatar
SDK
Posts: 703
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 7:40 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby SDK » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:04 pm UTC

chenille wrote:Millennial pretends to mean a particular generation, but really it's just a way of saying "kids today" without quite owning up to being the sort of person who would say that.

:lol:
The biggest number (63 quintillion googols in debt)

User avatar
freezeblade
Posts: 1406
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 5:11 pm UTC
Location: Oakland

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby freezeblade » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:15 pm UTC

So controversial, this subject is.

I'm born in the kinda-weird in-between (1985), and couldn't really associate with much of what was called "millennial" and have kinda adopted the moniker "elder millennial."

My (pretty loose) definition is that "elder millennials" can remember a time before the internet was mainstream, and grew up during the rapid web expansion. We learned to type on electronic keyboards, not computers (alpha-smart was the brand we had). The "computer lab" at school was full of blue-screened Apple IIGs computers. We remember 5.25" drives (when floppies were floppy), when it was such a big deal that windows 95 came out, and helped our teachers install it onto the only windows PCs available at school (usually teacher's office computer).

"Core" millennials don't remember a time before broadband, before the PC revolution, before facebook/myspace. My brother was born in 1990, and has a far different view of technology than I do, owing to this few year difference.
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 5480
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:28 pm UTC

Pew's breakdown is weird in how it makes Generation X and the Millennials both shorter than the previous two generations and shorter than the usual two-decades-ish generation duration. It almost seems like it would make more sense for Generation X to continue through the mid-80s, making us elder Millennials part of Generation X instead (as I thought I was growing up, before "Millennial" was a thing, though I do remember my kindergarten graduation making a big deal out of how we would be the Class of 2000), and making kids born through the middle of last decade still Millennials (as the original authors of the term, Strauss and Howe, included kids born through 2004 in the group).
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

DpEpsilon
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 4:36 am UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby DpEpsilon » Wed Jun 19, 2019 10:32 pm UTC

Surprise Twist: The comic was about how stupid definitional debates are! Screw linguistic prescriptivism!

Just waiting for Randall to move the white hat from the figure on the left to the figure on the right.

jgh
Posts: 146
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2011 1:04 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby jgh » Thu Jun 20, 2019 12:56 am UTC

Millennials have got adult children? 18-year-olds 18 years ago were having children? I thought people nowadays typically started breeding in their mid- to late-20s, with a significant number not getting around to it until their late 30s, so most Millennials are actually more likely to be taking their sprogs to nursery school.

Though I was on a Schools Admissions board in 2000-2010, and it was slightly depressing when I started seeing people who I'd been to school with in the 1980s appearing on their child's application forms. Really depressing was when some started appearing for their child's *secondary* school applications.

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 5480
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Pfhorrest » Thu Jun 20, 2019 1:40 am UTC

I recently ran into the parents of a girl I knew back in junior high school, who told me a bit about her adult child, their grandchild. Made me suddenly feel much older, still having no children myself (not that I'm planning on it) and just recently come around to thinking of my cohort as of child-bearing age, but not adult-child-having age.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

ijuin
Posts: 1150
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:02 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby ijuin » Thu Jun 20, 2019 2:03 am UTC

Given that all of my grandparents died before I was born, my initial reaction to hearing about people having an adult grandchild is “how have you not died of old age yet?”

User avatar
GlassHouses
Posts: 201
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2016 12:41 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby GlassHouses » Thu Jun 20, 2019 3:31 am UTC

ijuin wrote:Given that all of my grandparents died before I was born, my initial reaction to hearing about people having an adult grandchild is “how have you not died of old age yet?”

People may be breeding later, but they're also dying later. I think the odds are pretty decent that my parents will live to see at least one great-grandchild born. They had children in their late 20s, and so did one of those children. The grandkids are taking their time, but they have jobs and own homes; my parents are over 80 but in good health...

NotAllThere
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:54 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby NotAllThere » Thu Jun 20, 2019 3:57 am UTC

I just call them snowflakes. Or, for those who object to breakfast questions in maths exams - cornflakes. For balance, I refer to people who object to snowflakes, gammonflakes.
yangosplat wrote:So many amazing quotes, so little room in 300 characters!

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26823
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Jun 20, 2019 11:46 am UTC

freezeblade wrote:"Core" millennials don't remember a time before broadband, before the PC revolution, before facebook/myspace. My brother was born in 1990, and has a far different view of technology than I do, owing to this few year difference.

MySpace was founded in 2003. If your brother doesn't remember a time before that it's because he has a shit memory, not because he was born too late.

jgh wrote:Millennials have got adult children? 18-year-olds 18 years ago were having children? I thought people nowadays typically started breeding in their mid- to late-20s, with a significant number not getting around to it until their late 30s, so most Millennials are actually more likely to be taking their sprogs to nursery school.

I mean yes, *most*, but most isn't all. There are absolutely some people I went to high school with whose children have now graduated from high school. Teen pregnancy may have been decreasing for a while but it's not like it suddenly ended entirely by the late 90s.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

User avatar
Reka
Posts: 263
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2012 10:21 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Reka » Thu Jun 20, 2019 2:48 pm UTC

Generations are definitely weird, and not just when you try to name them. For example, my great-grandparents were mostly born in the late 1870s, and died towards the middle of the 20th century. My brother-in-law has a great-grandfather born 50 years before that, i.e. old enough to fight in the 1848 revolution in Hungary, and he barely lived to see the 20th century, dying in 1901. Granted, there's a 10 and half year age difference between my sister and her husband, but it's still incredible that four generations in his family add up to a half a century more than they do in our family.

HoopleDoople
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 6:35 am UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby HoopleDoople » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:09 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:Randall should get off his prescriptivist horse. Right now millennial just means anyone young in my circles, with a possible backformed etymology that it means anyone born this millennium. (Which, by the way, started in 2000 because the first millennium took 999 years.) I bet that by 2032 we'll be too far from the start of the millennium to call kids "millennials" so "millennial" will become "old people" to the youth.


I don't generally support resistance to the adaptability of language, but sometimes we need a word to retain its original meaning. In this case, we can't really have a meaningful discussion about generations if we lose the term for one of the generations. That's far more important than having another way to say "kids these days." And it's pretty frustrating for millenials to have the term for their generation turned into a disparaging term for youth. Which is likely why I've noticed many of my fellow millenials and even some of Gen Z using "boomer" as a disparaging term for seniors (which I also disagree with).

The etymology you give for millenial is definitely backformed (though even that is probably giving it too much legitimacy). Millenial was always meant to describe those who came of age around the turn of the millenium. This is why 1981 or 1982 is the usual starting point for millenials - because they would be the high school class of 2000.

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 5480
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Pfhorrest » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:57 pm UTC

HoopleDoople wrote:Which is likely why I've noticed many of my fellow millenials and even some of Gen Z using "boomer" as a disparaging term for seniors (which I also disagree with).

Boomers are in their 50s to 70s right now, so seniors generally are Boomers today.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

User avatar
GlassHouses
Posts: 201
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2016 12:41 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby GlassHouses » Fri Jun 21, 2019 3:02 am UTC

HoopleDoople wrote:
Flumble wrote:Randall should get off his prescriptivist horse. Right now millennial just means anyone young in my circles, with a possible backformed etymology that it means anyone born this millennium. (Which, by the way, started in 2000 because the first millennium took 999 years.) I bet that by 2032 we'll be too far from the start of the millennium to call kids "millennials" so "millennial" will become "old people" to the youth.


I don't generally support resistance to the adaptability of language, but sometimes we need a word to retain its original meaning. In this case, we can't really have a meaningful discussion about generations if we lose the term for one of the generations. That's far more important than having another way to say "kids these days." And it's pretty frustrating for millenials to have the term for their generation turned into a disparaging term for youth. Which is likely why I've noticed many of my fellow millenials and even some of Gen Z using "boomer" as a disparaging term for seniors (which I also disagree with).


This thing with naming generations seems like a uniquely American obsession. I don't remember this being a thing in Europe, at least not that I noticed.

It's an obsession people would be better off without. Whenever I hear people use those generation-names, it's always a lead-in to some awful, counterproductive generalization. It's not quite as toxic as when people generalize about race or gender, but it's never a good thing.

And it's not like you can't talk about modern history without those names. In fact, you can, and it's way more enjoyable when you actually say what you mean. If I want to say I'm too young to have heard the Beatles when they were recording and touring, simply saying that is way more descriptive and precise than when I say I'm a late Boomer.

keldor
Posts: 81
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:18 am UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby keldor » Fri Jun 21, 2019 5:45 am UTC

I graduated highschool in 2003, which by the formal definition should make me a millennial. However, it was only many years later that I started hearing the term commonly brandied about, clearly refering to children through young adults much younger than me. I personally would consider a "millennial" to be someone born from roughly 2000 to 2010. The first generation born to the world after the Internet had already become truely pervasive.

Certainly the internet existed and was even widespread in the '90s, but it was not until the advent of social media that it became the life comsuming monster that it is today.

Perhaps the traits older adults associate with "young millenials" are the traits I associate with people younger than myself as well. The proper term might be "post-millenial"?

Honestly, I doubt anyone puts much thought into generation names and exactly which generation they refer to. How many here can, without looking it up, say exactly when Generation X was, for instance? And while the baby boomers corresponded to a real boom in birth rates after WWII, and even Gen X had a bit of corrolation as the children of the baby boomers, the rate flattens later on and there is no clear cutoff point between "generations" besides the general idea that each one should be perhaps 20 or 25 years long.

Perhaps it was because no one had ever really mentioned a clear date and because I didn't care enough to look it up that I came to associate millenials as those born around or shortly after the turn of the millenium.

These generation names are really rather (retro) hipster trash made up on the spur of the moment by people when talking about their kids or maybe their highschool friends or heaven knows who, and afterwards the names stuck, so it should really come as no surprise that no one has a clear idea of who they were talking about, or even when they were talking about it now that the subject is mentioned decades later.

At least make up names that describe things, like '90s kids or something. Something where the meaning can be derived by someone hearing the word repeated outside of whatever frat it spawned in. Gen X indeed...

User avatar
cellocgw
Posts: 2067
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 7:40 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby cellocgw » Fri Jun 21, 2019 11:51 am UTC

My NewConstructivistDictionary(TM) defines "millenials" thusly:

Those who insist on the metric system, as in 'millimeter- enails'

The rest of you are, of course "inchworms."
resume
Former OTTer
Vote cellocgw for President 2020. #ScienceintheWhiteHouse http://cellocgw.wordpress.com
"The Planck length is 3.81779e-33 picas." -- keithl
" Earth weighs almost exactly π milliJupiters" -- what-if #146, note 7

jgh
Posts: 146
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2011 1:04 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby jgh » Fri Jun 21, 2019 6:39 pm UTC

ijuin wrote:Given that all of my grandparents died before I was born, my initial reaction to hearing about people having an adult grandchild is “how have you not died of old age yet?”

My great-grandmother died when I was 15, and her youngest sister (known universally in the family as plain "auntie" Laura) died when I was 25. Reflecting on it I feel privileged to have had that link back so far in time.

I'm the oldest child of an oldest child of an oldest child of an oldest child, so from my perspective a lot of my ancestors' families are close in time to me. My youngest aunt is 11 years older than me. My grandmother was 13 younger than auntie Laura.

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 26823
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Jun 22, 2019 1:10 pm UTC

keldor wrote:However, it was only many years later that I started hearing the term commonly brandied about, clearly refering to children through young adults much younger than me. I personally would consider a "millennial" to be someone born from roughly 2000 to 2010. The first generation born to the world after the Internet had already become truely pervasive.

Okay but then how do you explain articles about millennials and driving or marriage or house-buying? When Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez was elected there were thinkpieces about electing more millennials to Congress (as though any other option exists, given how linear time works). Those definitely weren't about people still under 18 at the time.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

User avatar
Sableagle
Ormurinn's Alt
Posts: 2149
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2015 4:26 pm UTC
Location: The wrong side of the mirror
Contact:

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby Sableagle » Sat Jun 22, 2019 5:32 pm UTC

Keep electing older and older people until people born in 2010 are old enough to replace them?

Code: Select all

John F. Kennedy       1917
Lyndon B. Johnson     1908
Richard Nixon         1913
Gerald Ford           1913
Jimmy Carter          1924
Ronald Reagan         1911
George Bush           1924
Bill Clinton          1946
George W. Bush        1946
Barack Obama          1961
Donald Trump          1946


You could make it to 2034 before you really have to stop electing baby boomers, and then Generation X will last you until 2050, by which time you can start electing people whose parents are only meeting for the first time a few hours after I type this.
Zohar wrote:You don't know what you're talking about. Please spare me your quote sniping and general obliviousness.

CorruptUser wrote:Just admit that you were wrong ... and your entire life, cyberspace and meatspace both, would be orders of magnitude more enjoyable for you and others around you.

IMSoP
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Jun 22, 2019 9:19 pm UTC

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby IMSoP » Sat Jun 22, 2019 9:56 pm UTC

keldor wrote:These generation names are really rather (retro) hipster trash made up on the spur of the moment by people when talking about their kids or maybe their highschool friends or heaven knows who, and afterwards the names stuck, so it should really come as no surprise that no one has a clear idea of who they were talking about, or even when they were talking about it now that the subject is mentioned decades later.


Nope. The concept, and at least some of the names, came from sociologists/demographers, observing groups of people who had similar experiences when growing up that shaped the way they interact with the world. Those groups can be defined based on when they were born - and, implicitly, where: my friend from Ghana was born at a similar time, but had very different experiences to my childhood as a British Millennial. Calling them "generations" is from a theory that dominant attitudes change once every 20 years or so, as new adults take their parents' place in society, but they're generalisations, not discrete categories.

I learned today that "Generation X" is named after the Douglas Coupland novel, rather than the other way around; but "Millennial" was coined by researchers William Strauss and Neil Howe - and they most definitely meant "coming of age around 2000", not "born around 2000". You can hear Neil Howe talking about it on a great language podcast called "The Allusionist", in an episode titled "Generation What?"

From there, like a lot of science, it has fed into the public consciousness via journalism, some of it very sloppy. The reason we didn't hear ourselves called "millennial" much growing up, although the term had been coined already, is that predictions of how we might be as adults are a lot trickier than observations of how we actually are. That's probably also why the following generation doesn't have a commonly used label yet - depending on where becomes convenient to draw the line, the oldest members are either just reaching adulthood, or still a few years off.
Last edited by IMSoP on Mon Jul 15, 2019 12:18 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

jpers36
Posts: 234
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:47 pm UTC
Location: The 3-manifold described by Red and Blue

Re: 2165: "Millennials"

Postby jpers36 » Mon Jun 24, 2019 3:29 pm UTC

Sableagle wrote:Keep electing older and older people until people born in 2010 are old enough to replace them?

Code: Select all

John F. Kennedy       1917
Lyndon B. Johnson     1908
Richard Nixon         1913
Gerald Ford           1913
Jimmy Carter          1924
Ronald Reagan         1911
George Bush           1924
Bill Clinton          1946
George W. Bush        1946
Barack Obama          1961
Donald Trump          1946


You could make it to 2034 before you really have to stop electing baby boomers, and then Generation X will last you until 2050, by which time you can start electing people whose parents are only meeting for the first time a few hours after I type this.


Notice that we did skip a generation presidentially. Barring a Bernie surprise in 2020, there will be no Silent Generation president.


Return to “Individual XKCD Comic Threads”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 97 guests