Favorite Cuisine?

Apparently, people like to eat.

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Favorite Cuisine?

American
6
7%
Latin American
1
1%
West European
7
8%
Mediterranean
18
20%
East European
0
No votes
African
1
1%
East Asian
45
51%
Middle Eastern
3
3%
Tropical
0
No votes
Other
7
8%
 
Total votes: 88

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Postby Kawa » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:49 pm UTC

In America, much of the time restaurant staff is paid under minimum wage and expected to make the difference in tips. (This is considered perfectly reasonable.) It's believed that this will hold them to a higher standard and do their job better.

I always tip, and often quite generously. Whenever possible, I tip the waiter directly instead of just leaving it on the table; if I can get access to the chef, then I will tip directly to the chef as well.

The best thing was when I went to a small family-run Japanese restaurant in Florida, where they make the sushi in front of you - I tipped the sushi chef and it turns out it was the owner of the place! He was rarely tipped directly and was very grateful. My boyfriend and I are regulars at the place, and I can't help but think that a little extra money out of my pocket is reasonable in exchange for warm, friendly service (they even recognize our faces when we go in and know I'm allergic to poultry, for instance.)
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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:56 pm UTC

I don't like that it's okay for a restaurant owner to pay his employees less than minimum wage because they'll make the rest up in tips. It shouldn't be my responsibility to pay his employees directly. That being said, I tip, and I tip.. well, I tip okay, I guess. 15-20%, more if the server kicked ass.. But it's part of how it's done. If I was unwilling to tip, I wouldn't eat out.

On the flip side, though, I hate that they're taxed on their tips. That's cash I gave them.. like a gift. So unless I'm tipping them over $10,000, they shouldn't be taxed.. and yet they are.

So I always try to tip in cash. Easier to lie about it that way.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:03 pm UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:A word of advice: Don't go to Sonny's or Woody's. Both of those are chain restaurants. If you find more than three or four locations of a single restaurant, steer clear from it. There are a few exceptions. Start with the local restaurants. The ones owned by a family, not some major company. The local restaurants are usually much more full of win than your commercialized restaurants like Sonny's.


That is my exact strategy for deciding where to eat, when I don't know the area and have no clues.

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Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:06 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:
PatrickRsGhost wrote:A word of advice: Don't go to Sonny's or Woody's. Both of those are chain restaurants. If you find more than three or four locations of a single restaurant, steer clear from it. There are a few exceptions. Start with the local restaurants. The ones owned by a family, not some major company. The local restaurants are usually much more full of win than your commercialized restaurants like Sonny's.


That is my exact strategy for deciding where to eat, when I don't know the area and have no clues.


And the plus side of this: When you're in an area you're not familiar with, these local establishments tend to give you more of a feel of the atmosphere in said area.
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Postby Bakemaster » Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:51 pm UTC

redthegreat wrote:English food was never bad, people just don't apreciate that in england food is traditionally used to fill you up, not as a means of social interactions, however spit roast pork or something traditional like that is the very essence of what Americans would consider "BBQ's" slow roasted over half a day until the meat peals off the bone. BBQ's in America are just plain wrong, get it right.

Does English food involve a lot of beans? That would explain why you're talking out your ass.

SecondTalon wrote:On the flip side, though, I hate that they're taxed on their tips. That's cash I gave them.. like a gift. So unless I'm tipping them over $10,000, they shouldn't be taxed.. and yet they are.

You may not be giving them that much, but any full time server at a decent restaurant in the U.S. makes several times that in tips during the year, all told. Why should they not pay taxes on their income when everyone else does?
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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:56 pm UTC

Belial wrote:
"And you don't tip as much as you do in America" Tipping is the worse idea ever, honestly if you were buying a car you wouldn't pay extra just because you felt like it. Stupid.


I missed this until dubsola pointed it out.

You deserve the poor service you get.

I deserve the excellent service I receive, and the free food my waiters often sneak me.


Where I live we all speak english but everything is french. We get excellent service as being a waiter is a well enough payed respected role, perhaps if your waiters were treated as well you would get as good service as us? Tipping is done here, but at up to 10% and only if service is good, honestly, how do you get good service if tips are ALWAYS given and generally at the same rate, and if someone doesn't tip you get your food spat in or something terrible from what I hear.

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A medieval german BBQ

People have been cooking meat on flames outside over a grill for hundreds of years, just because it is given the name BBQ its claimed as American. Pizza in it's modern form is Italian, just because Americans put diffrent toppings on some and cut it into wedges it becomes American? pffft. Rule Britania!

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:58 pm UTC

Bakemaster wrote:
SecondTalon wrote:On the flip side, though, I hate that they're taxed on their tips. That's cash I gave them.. like a gift. So unless I'm tipping them over $10,000, they shouldn't be taxed.. and yet they are.

You may not be giving them that much, but any full time server at a decent restaurant in the U.S. makes several times that in tips during the year, all told. Why should they not pay taxes on their income when everyone else does?


Because, as ridiculous as it is, I still see it as a gift, not a source of income.

(also, I only came up with 17,333 a year in tips for a server. Assuming they're being paid $4 an hour, that's only $25,000 a year. Way I figure it, at best, you've making $50 an hour in tips, but of course that's being split out several different ways.. I went with 6 - Host, Bartender, cook, busboy, someone I missed, yourself. Possibly worse, I never worked waitstaff, just heard stories. Lots of stories. My math could be horribly, horribly off.)

cooking meat on flames outside over a grill for hundreds of years,


That's not barbecue. Barbecue is using the heat and smoke, not the flame, to cook the meat. There is a difference between American and British English. Biscuit?
Last edited by SecondTalon on Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:00 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:00 pm UTC

$4 an hours?!?!? No wonder you tip. Over here it can range from "converted" $10 to £20 for a "server"

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:01 pm UTC

redthegreat wrote:$4 an hours?!?!? No wonder you tip. Over here it can range from "converted" $10 to £20 for a "server"


Right, but it's a cycle. Tips are mandatory because they make crap pay because tips are mandatory.

Youtuby goodness

Nice Guy Eddie: C'mon, throw in a buck!
Mr. Pink: Uh-uh, I don't tip.
Nice Guy Eddie: You don't tip?
Mr. Pink: Nah, I don't believe in it.
Nice Guy Eddie: You don't believe in tipping?
Mr. Blue: You know what these chicks make? They make shit.
Mr. Pink: Don't give me that. She don't make enough money that she can quit.
Nice Guy Eddie: I don't even know a fucking Jew who'd have the balls to say that. Let me get this straight - you don't ever tip?
Mr. Pink: I don't tip because society says I have to. All right, if someone deserves a tip, if they really put forth an effort, I'll give them something, a little something extra. But this tipping automatically, it's for the birds. As far as I'm concerned, they're just doing their job.
Mr. Blue: Hey, our girl was nice.
Mr. Pink: She was okay. She wasn't anything special.
Mr. Blue: What's special? Take you in the back and suck your dick?
Nice Guy Eddie: I'd go over twelve percent for that.
Mr. Pink: Look, I ordered coffee. Now we've been here a long fucking time and she's only filled my cup three times. When I order coffee, I want it filled six times.
Mr. Blonde: Six times. Well, what if she's too fucking busy?
Mr. Pink: The words "too fucking busy" shouldn't be in a waitress's vocabulary.
Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee.

(I think there's some omitted dialog here)

Mr. Pink: I'm very sorry the government taxes their tips, that's fucked up. That ain't my fault. It would seem to me that waitresses are one of the many groups the government fucks in the ass on a regular basis. Look, if you ask me to sign something that says the government shouldn't do that, I'll sign it. Put it to a vote, I'll vote for it, but what I won't do is play ball. And as for this non-college bullshit I got two words for that -learn to fucking type. 'Cause if you're expecting me to help out with the rent you're in for a big fucking surprise.


All that being said... In the USA if one is unwilling to tip 15*% for the server to show up and do their job without adding much to the experience, one should not eat out.

*Your percentage may differ on location. The larger the city, the more likely it is that minimum is 20-25% or higher.
Last edited by SecondTalon on Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:10 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:09 pm UTC

Well, over here I made £5.40 "tax free" when I was 14 at a coffee shop, that included collecting plates and then washing them, easy enough pay, that included Saturdays only. I now work in a pub "late night" for £24 for four hours. Don't ask why they do it like that.

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Postby pete » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:17 pm UTC

(have watched Reservoir Dogs many times, love the movie)

I tip, and I tip well. Why? If I didn't feel like tipping I'd go to a fucking drive-through.

The fact of the matter is: a sit-down meal is a luxury. People bringing you drinks, taking your order, generally keeping you happy. I call that a service, and I'm willing to pay for that service.

Mandatory tipping (or not tipping at all) can only degrade that service. If they get 10% anyway it's a part of their salary. If 10 to 20 percent on top of that ensures that I enjoy my meal, I'm more than happy to pay it.

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Postby Jesse » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:20 pm UTC

In the UK, when I go for a meal, I intend to pay for my food and the service. Whatever they charge is how much it costs for the food to be cooked and brought to me by a waitress/waiter. If the service is better than I would expect (And I know what to expect, I worked in a restaurant for a year) then I will also tip whoever made that meal more pleasant to me.

It seems if a tip is expected to pay their wages, then why isn't it just included in the price of food, and then tips can actually mean that you thought said waiter/ess was exceptional?

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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:30 pm UTC

Exactly my point! A tip should be directed to a specific person for excelent service, but living off tips is stupid. You pay for a meal, and the people who work there are payed to give you a meal, if they don't get payed enough they wont work thus people employing will have to pay them more to stay on thus they will get payed more eliminating the need for tips, tipping is in effect market failure.

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:30 pm UTC

how do you get good service if tips are ALWAYS given and generally at the same rate, and if someone doesn't tip you get your food spat in or something terrible from what I hear.


By tipping above and beyond the socially required.
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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:36 pm UTC

What if there was no socially required tip? Surely then the people raking in the money will be forced to pay there little bee's the proper wage.

The more you pay extra the more they will expect.

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:42 pm UTC

The price of food would just go up.

I just factor the price of the tip into the cost of the food when I'm deciding whether to eat out. It comes to the same difference.
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Postby Bakemaster » Mon Jul 23, 2007 7:31 pm UTC

According to state labor laws here in Massachusetts, a tipped employee is anyone who makes over $20 in a month from tips alone. The way it's set up, the minimum cash wage only applies when a server makes more than $7.50/hour from tips and paychecks combined. So even though minimum wage for servers in this state is $2.63/hour, the law requires that when tips don't add up with that wage to at least $7.50/hour, the employer has to make up the difference.
http://www.dol.gov/esa/programs/whd/state/tipped.htm

There is no "minimum" tip except as dictated by each customer's personal ethics, or in cases where a restaurant may impose a mandatory gratuity for parties of a certain size. Generally that means when you dine out with 6 or more people at a nice place, you can expect a 15-18% tip added on to your bill; you are free to pay more if you like, but not less.

When I get poor service, I leave a smaller tip. If something goes very wrong and I don't feel I was treated right, I will very occasionally not leave any tip, but that happens once a year at most. When my water is always full, my food is hot and tasty and my server is friendly and attentive I leave a bigger tip. What's so wrong about that?
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Postby Bondolon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 7:33 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:
SecondTalon wrote:And.. yeah, I've been reading the Wikipedia page on regional variations of barbecue.. well, first, there's a reason basically every US state has it's own entry, and sometimes regions within the state have separate entries... but mostly the little bit on Australia/New Zealand

public electric barbecues are common in city parks

Seriously? Electric? Seriously? You poor bastards.


Good find on the regional bbq variations, that's exactly what I was looking for.

Poor bastards? Well, without getting too parochial:
1. At least we have *something* to allow people to conduct Australian-style barbeques (Australian style-barbeques?) without having to drag their own structure to the park. The parks in England have nothing. Here you either buy a proper barbeque that is an incredible pain in the ass to drag around, or buy a tiny disposable barbeque that wouldn't cook a decent-sized steak. Do they have any public facilities in the US? If not, well... you don't have a leg to stand on (except that US bbq is not popular, and it sounds good. I've never seen any restaurant with some kind of pit for bbqing meat).

2. Most barbeque devices in the Australian home are either gas, with two plates - one which is a flat plate, the other a mesh, which allows some degree of creativity, or charcoal with a mesh which also can be used to create some delicious food. Both supply a good amount of heat. An electric barbeque in an Australian backyard would be ridiculed to the point of tears.

3. Some parks, particularly national parks (which are virtual wilderness and hence have no electricity supply), have open barbeques where you gather the wood, fire it up and put a grill over the top.

I've just remembered - there's a restaurant in London that serves 'American-style BBQ'... ok, found it. I guess it's still not the barbeque you're talking about.


Most parks here in America have multiple public charcoal grills in them.

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Postby Alomax » Mon Jul 23, 2007 7:45 pm UTC

I view the american tipping system as a feedback, and I use it rigorously. If someone is average, I will tip them 10% or so. If someone sucks, I will tip them nothing, or $1, to let them know that yes I did remember to give you a tip, but you sucked. If service is great I will give 20% or more.
It seems to me that if a server is getting crappy tips consistently, they're probably doing something wrong. They should either find a job they're better at, or put up some more effort.

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Postby Bondolon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 7:56 pm UTC

redthegreat wrote:Where I live we all speak english but everything is french. We get excellent service as being a waiter is a well enough payed respected role, perhaps if your waiters were treated as well you would get as good service as us? Tipping is done here, but at up to 10% and only if service is good, honestly, how do you get good service if tips are ALWAYS given and generally at the same rate, and if someone doesn't tip you get your food spat in or something terrible from what I hear.

People have been cooking meat on flames outside over a grill for hundreds of years, just because it is given the name BBQ its claimed as American. Pizza in it's modern form is Italian, just because Americans put diffrent toppings on some and cut it into wedges it becomes American? pffft. Rule Britania!


Tipping is done after the meal. There's no way they could spit in someone's food, preemptively expecting that they wouldn't tip.

As has been pointed out, using flames to cook doesn't make something Barbeque. That pig there isn't Barbeque. Barbeque evolved out of the Taina dish "barbicoa", which involved digging a hole in the ground, putting some meat in it, and setting it on fire. Simply put, real barbeque usually involves smoking (and ALWAYS involves cooking with low or indirect heat), and that's simply something that you're ignoring.

Pizza, as it exists, is distinctly American. Pizza originated in Italy, and that's a fact, but pizza in Italy is very purist, and pizza in America is extremely diverse. The Italian version, the purist version, is traditional pizza. The American version, the diverse version, is modern pizza. There's a pretty sizable difference between the two which can't be reconciled by calling American pizza a "copy" of Italian pizza.

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:03 pm UTC

Pizza, as it exists, is distinctly American. Pizza originated in Italy, and that's a fact, but pizza in Italy is very purist, and pizza in America is extremely diverse. The Italian version, the purist version, is traditional pizza. The American version, the diverse version, is modern pizza. There's a pretty sizable difference between the two which can't be reconciled by calling American pizza a "copy" of Italian pizza.


"Mexican" food in America is pretty much american, too. It came up in border towns, and was mostly mexican cooks catering to the taste of the gringos. It is distinct from actual mexican food.

Same with most chinese. It's heavily derived from the cuisine of Canton, a single small province of china, and is so heavily modified to cater to american tastes that it is, I am told, barely recognizable.
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Postby Bondolon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:17 pm UTC

Belial wrote:
Pizza, as it exists, is distinctly American. Pizza originated in Italy, and that's a fact, but pizza in Italy is very purist, and pizza in America is extremely diverse. The Italian version, the purist version, is traditional pizza. The American version, the diverse version, is modern pizza. There's a pretty sizable difference between the two which can't be reconciled by calling American pizza a "copy" of Italian pizza.


"Mexican" food in America is pretty much american, too. It came up in border towns, and was mostly mexican cooks catering to the taste of the gringos. It is distinct from actual mexican food.

Same with most chinese. It's heavily derived from the cuisine of Canton, a single small province of china, and is so heavily modified to cater to american tastes that it is, I am told, barely recognizable.


Living in Texas, there's Tex-mex and Mexican here. Tex-mex is the "exactly what you want and expect" Mexican, whereas the real Mexican has quite a few dishes that most Americans would consider disgusting. It's nice to be able to see both. As for the Chinese, I've only had "real" Chinese once or twice in my whole life, as the stuff you are talking about is very, very American.

edit: Of course, some Tex-mex (like El Chico) is actually starting to branch into neo-American cuisine, instead of merely copying Mexican cuisine and making it palatable for Americans.

edit2: I'd say the only thing that gets exported as-is is Japanese food, and that's only because they have so much variety that it's possible to pick-and-choose, getting only what Americans would like (albeit, making it the exact same way).

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:23 pm UTC

Living in Texas, there's Tex-mex and Mexican here. Tex-mex is the "exactly what you want and expect" Mexican, whereas the real Mexican has quite a few dishes that most Americans would consider disgusting. It's nice to be able to see both.


Yeah, once you get north of texas, you mostly only find "tex-mex" except the distinction isn't made because that's just "mexican"
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Postby Alomax » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:27 pm UTC

Bondolon wrote:whereas the real Mexican has quite a few dishes that most Americans would consider disgusting.


Menudo anyone? :shock: Its actually not all that bad, I find it bland and tasteless though.

I try and make my own Asian food from online recipes whenever possible, I find their cooking methods fun and interesting.

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Postby ArchangelShrike » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:32 pm UTC

Ooh, you're missing out. Pickled Pig's Feet? Shark Fin Soup? Deep Fried Chicken Legs? And of course.... Cardboard Dumplings? Some food in China really isn't all it's cracked up to be.

But if you only eat fake-Cantonese food made by Mexicans (nothing against them, just that noticing that most places I've been to employ them) you're missing out.

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:45 pm UTC

But if you only eat fake-Cantonese food made by Mexicans (nothing against them, just that noticing that most places I've been to employ them) you're missing out.


I....*like* fake cantonese food.

Would I eat the real stuff, given the chance? Definitely, I'll eat anything once.

That guy on "Bizarre foods" on the travel channel is my fucking hero. (As a side note, I desparately NEED to go to Trinidad and Tobago and get myself a bake-and-shark sandwich)

But I'm not feeling put upon that I'm eating the fake stuff. It tastes good, and that's all that matters. As I've said in another thread, there's a place where authenticity matters, and it's outside my mouth.
Last edited by Belial on Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:47 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby OCR » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:47 pm UTC

I haven't met a ton of people in my travels that doesn't have a soft spot for some type of fake Cantonese food.
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Postby Bondolon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:47 pm UTC

ArchangelShrike wrote:Ooh, you're missing out. Pickled Pig's Feet? Shark Fin Soup? Deep Fried Chicken Legs? And of course.... Cardboard Dumplings? Some food in China really isn't all it's cracked up to be.

But if you only eat fake-Cantonese food made by Mexicans (nothing against them, just that noticing that most places I've been to employ them) you're missing out.


I meant to say I've only had real Chinese food from a restaurant once or twice in my whole life. I've made all kinds of dishes, ranging from African to Filipino, but I know of very few restaurants that serve authentic anything (again, besides Japanese, and I suppose Korean, which are easily exportable as-is)

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:49 pm UTC

and I suppose Korean, which are easily exportable as-is)


There are three or four Korean restaurants around here. It's very strange.

The food is very good, albeit strange to an american palate.

But the restaurants are the strange part.

They're always in really good locations, with *really* nice decor. They don't charge a lot.....

...and they're *always* empty. When girl and I go, we're nearly always the *only* customers there.

And they never go out of business.

Our theory is organized crime involvement.
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Postby Kawa » Mon Jul 23, 2007 8:49 pm UTC

OCR wrote:I haven't met a ton of people in my travels that doesn't have a soft spot for some type of fake Cantonese food.

I'm one who tends to avoid it for other cheap fast foods, except in the case of pan-fried beef lo mein (which is more authentic than your average fake Cantonese food anyhow.)

But I think every cuisine has food that would be "disgusting" otherwise. The idea of eating rabbit weirds me out, as an example; another good example is any culture's take on blood pudding (I'm thinking Filipino diniguan.)

Also: It is possible to be as Filipino as they come and avoid balut like the plague. (Granted, I avoid it for allergy reasons, but even so.)
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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 10:18 pm UTC

But rabbit is tasty. So's squirrel. And turtle.

... and bull testicles.

Okay, so maybe I've eaten some slightly-odd things in my time. Only thing so far I've encountered that completely and totally disgusted me to the point where I spit it out was... Olives. Though I don't like mushrooms or kimchee either.

Re: Korean Joints - Same here with the one Korean place I know.. always empty, woman behind the counter was super nice and recongized us by the third time we came in.... could be low business, could be that my friend knows enough korean to properly part/say goodbye/whatever you call it. (Ungreet? Antigreet? Why the hell can't I think of the word that means "To say goodbye in a polite way"?)
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Postby robinberghuys » Tue Jul 24, 2007 3:06 pm UTC

You guys seem to like Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean and/or Japanese food. It's really quite a small, but delivious, step to Indonesian.

Indonesian is great. Both the kind you get over here in Holland (like Americanised Chinese food, this is Dutchified Indonesian) and the real stuff.
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Postby Belial » Tue Jul 24, 2007 3:08 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:But rabbit is tasty. So's squirrel.


Rabbit I will agree. Squirrel is greasy and nasty and generally unpleasant
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Postby Kawa » Tue Jul 24, 2007 5:58 pm UTC

robinberghuys wrote:You guys seem to like Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean and/or Japanese food. It's really quite a small, but delivious, step to Indonesian.

Indonesian is great. Both the kind you get over here in Holland (like Americanised Chinese food, this is Dutchified Indonesian) and the real stuff.

I *love* Southeast Asian food. And Indonesian food is a small delicious step from Filipino food, too. ;)
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Postby Rippy » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:06 pm UTC

Italian. Bring on the pasta.

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Postby Devilsaur » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:41 pm UTC

Yeah, east asian foods are amazing! And they're surprisingly good for you, well much more than fatty fries and burgers.

Szechuan cuisine is love. Though not too hot! Canton (americanized and some traditional) is good too, same with Thai. Japanese food is growing on me, though I'm still not a fan of tempura or really raw fish.

I just wish good authentic oriental dining was more readily available outside of the west coast and large cities.

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Postby une see » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:21 pm UTC

Devilsaur wrote:Yeah, east asian foods are amazing! And they're surprisingly good for you, well much more than fatty fries and burgers.

Szechuan cuisine is love. Though not too hot! Canton (americanized and some traditional) is good too, same with Thai. Japanese food is growing on me, though I'm still not a fan of tempura or really raw fish.

I just wish good authentic oriental dining was more readily available outside of the west coast and large cities.


Well, you would, wouldn't you. Devilsaur. (I don't know what that has to do with anything. But I have given up on making sense. Oh, and my family is from Sichuan, and <-- that's the actual pinying. I just had to point it out. Surprisingly enough, I hate spicy food, which sucks when I have to visit Sichuan. Everything there is spicy.)

Um...I pretty much just like all foods. Yay?
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Postby robinberghuys » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:44 pm UTC

une see wrote:Um...I pretty much just like all foods. Yay?


Me too, variety is the spice of life.
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Postby damienthebloody » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:57 pm UTC

Kangaroo Curry for dinner last night. Don't know why, but it's really comfort food for me.
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Postby redthegreat » Thu Jul 26, 2007 2:06 am UTC

I have a crave on for biltong at the moment, I don't have any curing at the moment and havn't been able to get any quality silverback :(

Thats one thing I like about German and French meat opposed to American and English is they hang there meat, hanging meat is essential for flavor. I went to france for the day a couple of weeks back and ordered a french burger, excellence, lovely slab of proper mince still pink in the middle "as proper beef should be". And the waiter brought it to me still sizzling on the pan and cracked a raw egg over it which cooked from its residual heat infront of me. Now that's service! No buns like you would in England/America but loads of frites. I don't eat moules myself as I can't but I hear good things of the Moules et Frites.

Oh and homemade mayonnaise, its beautiful.

Sorry for sub-threading here, but I most often and have since I was very little drank beer and wine with my food. In Guernsey and France it is the norm and perfectly legal, but when I was 17 in America the shit I got in for a glass of wine was unbelievable!!

I was wondering if you give your kids, or as young people drank alcohol at meal times, not for the sake of getting drunk, but because a nice chianti compliments pizza margherita better then cherry coke.

Here is a picture of me enjoying a shandy, when my farther drank half the can he topped it up with lemonade and gave it to me, much more classy then a sippy cup ey?


My choices

Tiger Larger - Thai Green Curry

Cobra Lager - Tika Masala

Chianti - Most italian food... garlic... tomato

Merlot - Lovely with red meats

Chardonnay - Beautiful women ;-)

Carling - Greezey kebab

Port - Ice-Cream

oooooo I fancy a bitter

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Last edited by redthegreat on Thu Jul 26, 2007 2:14 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.


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