Favorite Cuisine?

Apparently, people like to eat.

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Favorite Cuisine?

American
6
7%
Latin American
1
1%
West European
7
8%
Mediterranean
18
20%
East European
0
No votes
African
1
1%
East Asian
45
51%
Middle Eastern
3
3%
Tropical
0
No votes
Other
7
8%
 
Total votes: 88

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Postby 2DMan » Fri Jul 20, 2007 4:11 pm UTC

Give the Middle East cuisine some love! They have Lebanon, occasionally referred to as the France of the Middle East (by which they mean that they are known for good food, not that it is like French food in any fashion or anything). It tends to be spicy but delicious, and lots of goat is involved.
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Postby 22/7 » Fri Jul 20, 2007 4:16 pm UTC

I said East Asian, but I didn't feel that was all that accurate, so I'll ammend here.

Indian, Thai, Lebanese, in that order are the top of my list (but they are very close as far as which I like more or less).

I'm very picky about Thai places because I've spent some time in Thailand but I did (luckily) find this great, ubersketchy place in one of the lesser ghettos of Dallas. Cash only, bars on the windows, very poor spelling/grammar for the menu. But the food is very authentic.
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Postby dubsola » Fri Jul 20, 2007 4:23 pm UTC

I like a lot of food. Parse that to mean I like food in large quantities, or a lot of different kinds of food, either way.

Italian food is like a big hug, it's just so warm and smooth and delicious. I make a mean chorizo and mushroom with tomato sauce pasta, but can never get it tasting as good as a proper Italian nona.

Chinese food is interesting and delicious. Both Cantonese and Sichuan. It's harder to find good cheap Cantonese in London than in Western Australia, that also applies to Thai and Vietnamese. Dim sum is a great way to start the Sunday. The larger group the better. Little packets of goodness. There's a killer Sichuan restaurant in Soho in London, which does a rather spicy mouth-numbing beef, and a super good pork knuckle. In Perth there is a cheap Cantonese restaurant called Uncle Billy's that stays open late, and I've never found a salt and pepper squid as good as theirs.

Thai food is so good. They really know how to make a salad! My friend back in Australia is renowned for her green curry, my favourite.

Indian curries are great, of course, but I love having samosas and bhajis. In East London there are a lot of Bangladeshi restaurants, most which aren't that good. I can't describe the difference between Indian and Bangladeshi, but it's there. Anyone?

Vietnamese food is pretty good, it's not my favourite but is nice for a change. Australia has a large Vietnamese population and so there are lots of good, cheap Vietnamese restaurants.

I haven't had Indonesian/Malaysian food since leaving Perth. Miss a good beef rendang or nasi goreng.

Japanese food wins for simplicity (sushi) and showy preparation (teppenyaki). A beautifully prepared sushi/sashimi platter is so good!

Western Europe - ah, French food is sublime. I went to Paris in May, and every dinner I had was incredible, culminating in one of the oldest restaurants in the world, Tour D'Argent. Now THAT was an experience. :)

Spanish food in Barcelona was fantastic, I did start to get a bit tired of tapas but there's plenty of other stuff as well. I like a good paella but haven't been to Madrid or Valencia, so there's something to look forward to. Spanish chorizo is awesome. Bocadillas are awesome. Funny, my GF 'lost' her vegatarianism in the face of a salami sandwich in Barcelona. One bite and she says 'Where have you been all my life?'

English food is nice, that's really what I've grown up with - roasts, sausages and mashed potatoes, gravy, steamed vegetables and so on.

I've eaten a lot of Caribbean food, love jerk chicken but after going to Grenada in April, and eating nothing but chicken, rice, peas, and various fish, I kind of overdosed on it. Now I just have it rarely. Patties are great. I miss Ting!

Same thing happened with Moroccan food - it's pretty rare I'll crave a tagine-cooked meal nowadays.

There's lots of awesome African food in London. Eritrean is cool.

Also lots of Turkish and Persian foods, like grilled meats, and dips. They're cool.

I'd like to have some proper meals of the following countries:

- Greece
- Mexico
- USA (lots of different kinds, I've really only had soul food, and then just one meal - my heart almost stopped from all the grease)
- South America

Oh yeah, I've had Tibetan food. It's pretty good.

I will always eat a delicious big ass-burger. Wow, that sounds disgusting.

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Postby TRM » Fri Jul 20, 2007 4:24 pm UTC

Middle Eastern food all the way. I can't spell any of it, but they really do make the best rice considering how it is a vital reagent of almost all their dishes.
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Postby dubsola » Fri Jul 20, 2007 4:27 pm UTC

Bakemaster wrote:The only really good food I had while in London was an apple turnover from a pastry shop and a curry lunch thing from this Polish cafe right near the Mornington Crescent tube station. I got fish and chips once, must have been a bad place because it was obscenely greasy and not very flavorful. I also had pretty decent indian takeout from one place. I might have found some better food if I hadn't had no budget for my trip, but ehhh... If you're going to spend a lot of money you can find good food in just about any major city. Still, London food in my memory will always be a million Subways (I HATE Subway), a million generic kebab places, an inexplicable number of fried chicken places, and a depressing lack of Italian or Mexican places.


I've yet to find some good fishnchips in this city. I concede that point with a heavy heart.

Good cheap food here is rare, but it is there. Around the corner from my work, a place sells pizzas for 4 pounds (that's cheap for me). I wonder if your good Indian takeout was from Rasa - 3.5 pounds for three kinds of curry.

Fried chicken - haha, yes, there is a lot of that here! I like to look at their names, they all have funny names. Like Chicken Cottage, or the clearly deluded 'Perfect Fried Chicken'.

Fine. This city is overrun with chain stores. :evil:

You have to hunt down good food, and it will usually cost anything from a bit to a lot, but when you do find it - woah baby!

EDIT - ok, I guess the food here ON AVERAGE is not good, because the average is brought down. And as a tourist, you don't always know where to go. So I would hereby like to say that if anyone ever comes to London and wants some recommendations, I'd be happy to oblige.

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Postby Bakemaster » Fri Jul 20, 2007 5:56 pm UTC

Actually the takeout was from a place in Hemel, where I spent a couple days before going into London.
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Postby xyzzy » Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:35 pm UTC

In rough order:

Chinese/East Asian
Middle Eastern (Iranian is awesome)
Indian subcontinent
Mexican
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Postby Sprocket » Fri Jul 20, 2007 7:01 pm UTC

Indian, but I love variety. What would I pick for Indian on that list?

Sandry wrote:My top three are Thai, Indian and Tibetan. My city so very wins for having two Tibetan restaurants in easy walking distance of my house.

I've learned to cook acceptable Indian food myself by now (though I wish I could do a better palak paneer), so I don't go out to eat that as often, but we have dal and anda masala at my place all the blammed time...

I just wish I lived near a Thai restaurant I *liked*.

The funny thing, and I've wondered for a while if other people find this as well, is that while I've had Thai and Mexican dishes of roughly commensurate heat, I apparently cannot deal with habaneros and jalapenos at all, while thai chiles don't bother me.

Anyone else get that? Champ at downing stuff hot enough to burn through your table in one cuisine, horribly mewling kittens with another cuisine?


Thai tonight before going to harvard square for HP fun?
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Postby Kawa » Fri Jul 20, 2007 7:59 pm UTC

Filipino food is the best comfort food ever. In fact, I just came from a Filipino restaurant for lunch and I am *stuffed.* But it's not really appropriate for fancy situations, though I can't put my finger on why. I like things being flavorful without being too spicy, so I can't really take much of curry dishes and the like. I'll eat it, I just can't really *love* it. (I make an exception for samosas though.) I will almost always be the one piping for Asian food when asked where to go eat, as long as the nearest place isn't crappy.

I will always have a weakness for (in no particular order):
1) bubble tea
2) soft shell crab sushi
3) pan-fried noodles
4) palabok/pancit bihon (thick clear noodles with a shrimp-based sauce, piles of fresh seafood, and ground fried pork skin [chicharones] as garnish. It's like paella on noodles but even better.)
5) Filipino-style barbecued pork
6) fried dumplings
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Postby Urbal T » Fri Jul 20, 2007 10:17 pm UTC

This is almost as bad as the cheese vs chocolate thread! I think I like quite a lot of food from every category there.

In particular, I've enjoyed: American, Mexican, Caribbean, Moroccan, French, German, Italian, Russian, Egyptian, Greek, Lebanese, Ethiopian, Indian, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese...and probably others I haven't mentioned.

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Two lamb chops, one chicken souvlaki skewer, one beef souvlaki skewer, a small pile of calamaria, all served on greek potatoes, greek rice, and greek salad, with bread and tzatziki.

Excuse me, I have to go die of delicious now.


You are reminding me of why I'm thrilled my church festival is next week.

EDIT: to clarify--greek orthodox church festival=food paradise. I greatly enjoy greek and italian food.


I usually go to the greek festivals at both greek orthodox churches near me. And I'm not really a cofee drinker, but I love the Greek coffee there (also known as Turkish coffee).
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Postby Emmaskillz » Sat Jul 21, 2007 1:26 pm UTC

I voted Eastern Asian. I <3 Asian food so much. Particularly Japanese. Mmmmm I love sushi and sashimi and sukiyaki and everything!! Oh I have a Japanese friend who makes some mean Japanese pancakes. They've got cabbage in the batter and they're cooked in soy sauce on one side then flipped onto a frying egg and then served with mayonnaise, fish flakes and seaweed powder. Oh they're so good. The fish flakes dance at you too, it's kinda freaky.

I love Thai food and Vietnamese food as well. And Chinese and all Asian food. There are some pretty good Asian restaurants all over Australia. All the ones I've been to have been fantastic.

I love Indian food as well. I love curries and I make a nice curry but it's not fantastic because I kind of made it up. My grandma has curry parties! And she cooks samosas and orders naan bread. Oh yum. Food is so good.

Surprisingly I don't really like Italian food. My boyfriend loves it, so that sucks. I feel disgusting after eating it and heavy and lethargic. I don't like the taste a lot either.

At the moment I am obsessed with soup. It's winter here and I have soup every day. It never gets old. Mmm soup :D

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Postby Dark Ragnarok » Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:19 pm UTC

Ummmmm although i prefer Japanese over nearly anything...

I like Japaisican. have any of you gusy tried any asain food together with mexican?

it's seriously sex on a plate. A taco wrapped kung pao, with noodles and enchiladas..... fuck i'm getting way to hungry brb....

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Postby fortyseventeen » Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:40 pm UTC

I should have known that everyone woulud have chosen Japanese/East Asian. Of course, it helped that I lived in Tokyo for 18 mo.
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Postby Bondolon » Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:48 pm UTC

I like neo-american cuisine. While nothing like hamburgers and pot roast, it takes the best of other cultures' foods and integrate them into itself.

That said, Japanese and German tie for close runners-up.
Last edited by Bondolon on Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:52 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby SecondTalon » Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:51 pm UTC

Cajun, Creole, and Southern.

So.. I guess American..?
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 2:46 pm UTC

Emmaskillz wrote:Oh I have a Japanese friend who makes some mean Japanese pancakes. They've got cabbage in the batter and they're cooked in soy sauce on one side then flipped onto a frying egg and then served with mayonnaise, fish flakes and seaweed powder. Oh they're so good. The fish flakes dance at you too, it's kinda freaky.


Okonomiyaki! I had it for the first time the other day. It is so delicious! Good one. Does you know why the fish flakes dance?

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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 2:52 pm UTC

Bondolon wrote:I like neo-american cuisine. While nothing like hamburgers and pot roast, it takes the best of other cultures' foods and integrate them into itself.


I would like to eat more 'American' cuisine. Someone posted in a Slashdot discussion about it, and piqued my interest. They mentioned cajun, chowder, barbeque (St Louis, Kentucky and Louisiana), various Chinese adaptations, cheese steak, soul food, and a lot of other things.

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:05 pm UTC

Wait, you're not familiar with barbecue?

You poor bastard.
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Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:27 pm UTC

All those not familiar with barbecue need to get themselves down here to the South. Before you go to just one state and try barbecue, and say whether you like it or not, you must try every single barbecue restaurant in every single state. A word of advice: Don't go to Sonny's or Woody's. Both of those are chain restaurants. If you find more than three or four locations of a single restaurant, steer clear from it. There are a few exceptions. Start with the local restaurants. The ones owned by a family, not some major company. The local restaurants are usually much more full of win than your commercialized restaurants like Sonny's.

I chose American for the following reason: Define "American." McDonald's? Sure. Burger King? Why not? KFC? Fine by me. The problem with these three restaurants, and millions of others, is that the cuisine for the most part was born outside of the country, but was brought over from those countries by the immigrants/settlers over the centuries.

Chinese restaurants began opening up in the late 1800s/early 1900s in parts of California when Chinese immigrants came here to help work on the trans-continental railroad. The Chinese restaurants opened up mainly to feed the immigrant workers with food similar to what they ate back in their home country. After a while, other races began coming into the restaurants, and that's when the owners realized they could make a profit. The same could be said for Italian restaurants, that began to show up in New York and elsewhere when the Italian immigrants came to this country. Same thing goes for the Mexican restaurants. Cajun and Creole cuisine was invented down in Louisiana for one major reason: It gets hot and humid down there. The hot spices help you sweat, and help cool you off in the long run. Some of the Southern cuisine came from the African slaves. Sandwiches of all kinds came from Europe, including the hamburger.

A lot of the foreign cuisines have been Americanized since they were brought here. If you go to China, you might be surprised to find that the food may be a bit spicier, or has ingredients not used here. Same can go for Italy, Mexico, Spain, France, etc. A lot of the cuisine we eat here that is so-called "(Nationality) Cuisine" has been "Americanized" to better please the multi-cultural pallet.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:32 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Wait, you're not familiar with barbecue?


Woah, hold on there! Suggesting to an Australian that he or she is not familiar with barbeques is... provocative. It is an integral part of our culture. We have public barbeques in our parks, free for anyone to use (unlike in England).

I was referring to other kinds of barbeque that I'd read about. Here's the part of the post from Slashdot, about American cuisine, which mentions "American" barbeque.

The current state of Barbeque is entirely an American thing, though the Dutch independently reinvented it in South Africa later under the name "braai." (This is unfair to foreigners, as we use the word "barbeque" very differently than they do; a Briton hearing that word will think of the situation we think of as "grilled," and when they hear grill, they think of what we think of as stove-top burners. I do not know what foreigners call what we call Barbeque, though I know Australia uses the word the way we do.) We also invented Pit Barbeque (yes, we mean something different by that phrase too, sorry.) There's also Saint Louis Barbeque, Kentucky Barbeque and Louisiana Barbeque, all of which are substantially different (one's stewed in sauce, one's over a grill range open fire and one's surrounded by coal heat in a brick pit.)


'Barbeque' is a funny word, when you read it a few times.

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:40 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:
SecondTalon wrote:Wait, you're not familiar with barbecue?


Woah, hold on there! Suggesting to an Australian that he or she is not familiar with barbeques is... provocative. It is an integral part of our culture. We have public barbeques in our parks, free for anyone to use (unlike in England).



From Wikipedia,
In...Australia and many parts of Europe, barbecue is either fried or grilled, and generally barbecue appliances do not have a lid.

Fried? Grilled? Of course, that might have to do with the language divide...

In British English usage, barbecueing refers to a fast cooking process directly over high heat
In US English usage, however, grilling refers to a fast process over high heat whilst barbecueing refers to a slow process using indirect heat and/or hot smoke

I believe that your barbecue has little to nothing to do with my barbecue. Barbecue, done properly, takes more than 5 hours, sometimes upwards of 20.*

*roughly guessing on the times and experiences I've had with people starting the barbecue process at around 8pm for lunch the next day/getting up at 3am to help with getting the grill and such fired up to start selling sandwiches at 9, 10am, etc.
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Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:48 pm UTC

What people in Britain, parts of Canada, and Australia refer to as "barbeque" or "barbecue", we Americans tend to refer as "cook-outs" with "grilled foods." The grilled foods can consist of anything: hamburgers, hot dogs, steaks, chicken (all the norm), to fish (salmon mainly), vegetables (sometimes grilled with the steaks, chicken, or fish), other seafood (shrimp, crab, lobster), or anything else.

When Americans say barbecue, depending on what region they live in, it can sometimes vary. When someone in the Southern states says "let's go get some barbecue," they are usually referring to smoked or roasted meat, usually a shoulder cut of beef or pork, sliced, shredded, or chopped, mixed with a blend of spices, and sometimes coated in "barbecue sauce," which usually consists of tomato paste (or ketchup/catsup), brown sugar, various spices, maybe chopped onion and bell pepper, and maybe a bit of mustard. The sauce's ingredients and spiciness (hot or mild) can vary from one state to another, and even from one restaurant to another. Remember my last post about trying every single restaurant? Now you know why. No two restaurants make the same sauce. The meat can vary just as widely. Some places only do pork and chicken, and the only beef is grilled hamburgers and steaks. Some do it all. I think in Texas it's beef only (no shock there). Along the coastal states or cities (Savannah, GA, North and South Carolinas, Florida, east coast of Texas, and Louisiana), they may do seafood.

Something else you should try if you come to the south: low country boil. Full of Southern win. Lots of shrimp, sausage, corn, potatoes, and onions. Lots of win.
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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:54 pm UTC

West KY also barbecues mutton.

Where I am is interesting for barbecue drift, in that Louisville has a local barbecue joint by the name of Mark's Feed Store. There's a place in Louisville that is an expansion of a Paducah (a city in West KY) chain. Driving from Louisville to Paducah will take you about three and a half hours.

It's absolutely astounding as to how different barbecue can be when evolved in different areas. They're radically different things, and they only have 260 miles between them, give or take. Last time I was in Georgia and whatever, I completely forgot to eat barbecue, like an idiot.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:55 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Fried? Grilled? Of course, that might have to do with the language divide...

Yep, that was my point of confusion. Turns out I had no idea what American barbeque was. I am indeed a poor bastard.

SecondTalon wrote:...roughly guessing on the times and experiences I've had with people starting the barbecue process at around 8pm for lunch the next day/getting up at 3am to help with getting the grill and such fired up to start selling sandwiches at 9, 10am, etc.

Sounds like fun. Any food that requires getting up in the middle of the night must be pretty good. What's the deal with selling sandwiches?

PatrickRsGhost wrote:... a delicious description of some food I've not eaten ...

That sounds incredible.

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:59 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:...roughly guessing on the times and experiences I've had with people starting the barbecue process at around 8pm for lunch the next day/getting up at 3am to help with getting the grill and such fired up to start selling sandwiches at 9, 10am, etc.

Sounds like fun. Any food that requires getting up in the middle of the night must be pretty good. What's the deal with selling sandwiches?


Boy Scout fundraiser. Easy way to make some cash, really. Assuming you have the equipment to cook it, at least.

And.. yeah, I've been reading the Wikipedia page on regional variations of barbecue.. well, first, there's a reason basically every US state has it's own entry, and sometimes regions within the state have separate entries... but mostly the little bit on Australia/New Zealand

public electric barbecues are common in city parks

Seriously? Electric? Seriously? You poor bastards.
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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:59 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:What's the deal with selling sandwiches?


One of the standard ways of serving barbecue is on a hamburger bun, sometimes with onions or cole slaw
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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:10 pm UTC

There is no such thing as "American" food as it is all from other places, bagels, pizza's, turkey, even apple pie arn't American. I think all you have to accredit yourself with is KFC and deep frying stuff.

If you are ever in england the best meal you can probably get is to go to some pub down some old road, find yourself a seat and order a ploughmans or a steak and guinness pie.

Go down to brighton and get yourself some cheese on chips, thats lovely.

There is little cheep good food in london, but the expensive food is world class. "And you don't tip as much as you do in America" Tipping is the worse idea ever, honestly if you were buying a car you wouldn't pay extra just because you felt like it. Stupid.

For me the best food has to be bean-jar or Gache Melee "me-la" reminds me of my youth.

English food was never bad, people just don't apreciate that in england food is traditionally used to fill you up, not as a means of social interactions, however spit roast pork or something traditional like that is the very essence of what Americans would consider "BBQ's" slow roasted over half a day until the meat peals off the bone. BBQ's in America are just plain wrong, get it right.

Watch Hugh Fernley Whittingstall - River Cottage that will show you some amazing British recipes.

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Postby Kawa » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:14 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Seriously? Electric? Seriously? You poor bastards.

QFT, and I mainly eat (probably blasphemous to those used to American barbecue) Filipino-style (think Thai/Indonesian satay, using pork, generally without the tumeric [unless Southern Filipino, which I'm not] and a little sweeter.) Charcoal and/or wood forever!

I have not had enough of the various Southern-style barbecues to determine a preference. I need to change that and quickly...

redthegreat wrote:There is no such thing as "American" food as it is all from other places, bagels, pizza's, turkey, even apple pie arn't American. I think all you have to accredit yourself with is KFC and deep frying stuff.

Lies and blasphemy, if you look at soul food, which is very uniquely Black American (and usually Southern at that.) And of course, the barbecue.

There's a lot of interesting cuisine that's "American ____", where you fill in the blank with another ethnicity. It's why pizza from New York is infamous and nothing like pizza from Italy, for instance. Another good example is most of the things that have wound up in Chinese restaurants (General Tso's Chicken, bubble tea, etc) invented by immigrant groups trying to attract Americans to their stores. Or for another great example, how about Hawaiian SPAM Musubi?
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Postby redthegreat » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:15 pm UTC

Wikipedia can be wrong you know, Australia is practically the birth-place of bbq, only they got it from the British. And that entry was based on a commercial with an Australian actor?!?!? I hate the way most Americans think everything was invented by them.

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:16 pm UTC

redthegreat wrote:There is no such thing as "American" food as it is all from other places, bagels, pizza's, turkey, even apple pie arn't American. I think all you have to accredit yourself with is KFC and deep frying stuff.


And corn, potatoes, turkey.. and bison.

Australia is practically the birth-place of bbq


So, Australia is familiar with the practice of cooking meats on a low heat for multiple hours on time because they too have a history of giving the lower quality meats to the slaves?
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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:20 pm UTC

There is no such thing as "American" food as it is all from other places, bagels, pizza's, turkey, even apple pie arn't American.


There's american food, it just doesn't have a huge history on it, and it's all derived from other, more traditional foods elsewhere. Nearly everything you get in a "chinese" or "mexican" restaurant in america is a uniquely american derivation from more traditional foods elsewhere.

And then there are restaurants like chilis and applebees and tgi fridays which are constantly just *making shit up*. That would all qualify as american as well. Some of it is even edible.

And I believe the southern barbecue referenced heavily above is an american creation.

Fried Gator on a stick would also count.

Pizza in its modern form, also us.

I think all you have to accredit yourself with is KFC and deep frying stuff.


Actually, wrong again. Deep frying, as a process, was brought over from Africa, if I recall correctly.

I have never stopped thanking that continent.

Edit: And in the time it took me to type that, much of it was said by others.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:23 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:And.. yeah, I've been reading the Wikipedia page on regional variations of barbecue.. well, first, there's a reason basically every US state has it's own entry, and sometimes regions within the state have separate entries... but mostly the little bit on Australia/New Zealand

public electric barbecues are common in city parks

Seriously? Electric? Seriously? You poor bastards.


Good find on the regional bbq variations, that's exactly what I was looking for.

Poor bastards? Well, without getting too parochial:
1. At least we have *something* to allow people to conduct Australian-style barbeques (Australian style-barbeques?) without having to drag their own structure to the park. The parks in England have nothing. Here you either buy a proper barbeque that is an incredible pain in the ass to drag around, or buy a tiny disposable barbeque that wouldn't cook a decent-sized steak. Do they have any public facilities in the US? If not, well... you don't have a leg to stand on (except that US bbq is not popular, and it sounds good. I've never seen any restaurant with some kind of pit for bbqing meat).

2. Most barbeque devices in the Australian home are either gas, with two plates - one which is a flat plate, the other a mesh, which allows some degree of creativity, or charcoal with a mesh which also can be used to create some delicious food. Both supply a good amount of heat. An electric barbeque in an Australian backyard would be ridiculed to the point of tears.

3. Some parks, particularly national parks (which are virtual wilderness and hence have no electricity supply), have open barbeques where you gather the wood, fire it up and put a grill over the top.

I've just remembered - there's a restaurant in London that serves 'American-style BBQ'... ok, found it. I guess it's still not the barbeque you're talking about.

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:26 pm UTC

They probably do serve actual barbecue, but it sounds like the reviewers were ordering the ribs.

Also a good choice, so I can't fault.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:29 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
redthegreat wrote:Australia is practically the birth-place of bbq


So, Australia is familiar with the practice of cooking meats on a low heat for multiple hours on time because they too have a history of giving the lower quality meats to the slaves?


The point of disagreement is caused by the different definitions of barbeque.

Funny thing, though. Something about what you said made me think of casserole stews - same principle. Take some low grade meat, and cook it for a long time, and it turns out to be quite delicious.

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Postby SecondTalon » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:31 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:[1. At least we have *something* to allow people to conduct Australian-style barbeques (Australian style-barbeques?) without having to drag their own structure to the park. The parks in England have nothing. Here you either buy a proper barbeque that is an incredible pain in the ass to drag around, or buy a tiny disposable barbeque that wouldn't cook a decent-sized steak. Do they have any public facilities in the US? If not, well... you don't have a leg to stand on (except that US bbq is not popular, and it sounds good. I've never seen any restaurant with some kind of pit for bbqing meat).


Ya, I kid, I kid. Something is better than nothing. I can't speak for elsewhere, but most of the public parks in Kentucky have several charcoal grills set up. Sure, you have to bring your own charcoal, but that's to be expected. I've seen a few places with pits, I guess how you described.. areas where you could build a fire, or have a pseudo-barbecue pit, provided you brought enough fuel for it. But those are fairly rare.. just a grill is the most common.

Myself, it's more of a personal thing, but I cannot abide gas grills. Charcoal or fire.. gas makes everything taste funny.

I've just remembered - there's a restaurant in London that serves 'American-style BBQ'... ok, found it. I guess it's still not the barbeque you're talking about.


Could be close. Ribs are hard to cook quickly, from what I've heard. But it sounds close enough.. if you're in the area, might as well check them out.

All platters are served (on plastic plates)
Is it bad that I've eaten at dozens of places that sound more or less like that?
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Postby Kawa » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:31 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:
SecondTalon wrote:
redthegreat wrote:Australia is practically the birth-place of bbq


So, Australia is familiar with the practice of cooking meats on a low heat for multiple hours on time because they too have a history of giving the lower quality meats to the slaves?


The point of disagreement is caused by the different definitions of barbeque.

Funny thing, though. Something about what you said made me think of casserole stews - same principle. Take some low grade meat, and cook it for a long time, and it turns out to be quite delicious.

I think many of us do something similar in a crock pot or pressure cooker. I can think of a few good Filipino (at least I think they're Filipino, my mother cooks them) stews that involve tough beef in a pressure cooker along with all sorts of other bits of tastiness. Mmmmmmm.

And re: those mini grills SecondTalon referred to: there's a few dotting NYC parks that I know of. There was also another behind my dorm house down in Florida, and the RAs would set up barbecue nights about once every other week. Good times...
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Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:36 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:Do they have any public facilities in the US? If not, well... you don't have a leg to stand on (except that US bbq is not popular, and it sounds good. I've never seen any restaurant with some kind of pit for bbqing meat).


We do have public facilities here (parks, pavilions, etc.) that have mounted grills (barbeques). All grills are charcoal, and are either big enough to grill about 4 hamburgers and 4 hotdogs (for a family of 4), or a lot larger for the pavilions (covered picnic areas), usually intended for a large gathering (company picnics, wedding receptions, family reunions, Boy Scout troop meetings, etc.). Depending on the park, the grill for those can be big enough to flare up an entire cow in under 7 minutes.

Some BBQ restaurants do have the smoke pits, or a large barrel smoker. One restaurant I used to frequent a lot because they were right behind my house has one of those large barrel-shaped smokers. Whenever I stepped outside it smelled so damn good I could hardly stand it. If I had enough money, I'd go there for lunch or supper, instead of making my own food. What was worse was I could see said BBQ restaurant out my kitchen window. Over the sink. Within the line of sight if I stood in front of my fridge trying to figure out what's for lunch or supper. Nothing good. To hell with it. I've got $7. That's enough for a sammich, home fries, and tea. Major win.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:38 pm UTC

redthegreat wrote:There is no such thing as "American" food as it is all from other places, bagels, pizza's, turkey, even apple pie arn't American. I think all you have to accredit yourself with is KFC and deep frying stuff.


Sorry, you're wrong. I might have to repost this thing I found on Slashdot. It's umpteen different foods that originated in the US - some are totally original, others are remixed ideas.

There is little cheep good food in london, but the expensive food is world class.


Too true. There is also a really great range of ingredients for cooking at home. Especially at the markets. Like sausages - venison and juniper, pork and leek, wild boar and apple... they are awesome. And lots of stuf from other countries.

"And you don't tip as much as you do in America" Tipping is the worse idea ever, honestly if you were buying a car you wouldn't pay extra just because you felt like it. Stupid.


Allow me to be controversial - English customer service is generally bad. Really bad. I've only been to New York, but the service there was incredible. I will happily contribute to a low-paid worker's income in order to reward decent service.

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Postby Belial » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:41 pm UTC

"And you don't tip as much as you do in America" Tipping is the worse idea ever, honestly if you were buying a car you wouldn't pay extra just because you felt like it. Stupid.


I missed this until dubsola pointed it out.

You deserve the poor service you get.

I deserve the excellent service I receive, and the free food my waiters often sneak me.
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Postby dubsola » Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:47 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Ya, I kid, I kid. Something is better than nothing. I can't speak for elsewhere, but most of the public parks in Kentucky have several charcoal grills set up. Sure, you have to bring your own charcoal, but that's to be expected. I've seen a few places with pits, I guess how you described.. areas where you could build a fire, or have a pseudo-barbecue pit, provided you brought enough fuel for it. But those are fairly rare.. just a grill is the most common.


There's actually a bit of both in Aus. Some are pits ringed with concrete (with a grill on top, which I guess you could ignore), some are brick structures with a place for wood or charcoal and a flat plate on top.

I knew you were joking. :)

I'm not sure why the city parks only have electric stoves, but I'm guessing it's to reduce the risk of fire - some people have no fire safety. Especially since we always drink a lot with a barbeque (a generalisation that is pretty much spot on). I just remembered, we once destroyed our barbeque when we cooked so much food on it that the fat tray caught fire... in the middle of summer... underneath a tree with a bunch of dead leaves, with dead leaves surrounding the barbeque... and every fire engine in the city tied up an hour's drive away battling a massive bushfire. Oh yeah, and one of us wanted to put the fire out with the hose. Good times.


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