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Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:12 pm UTC
by Narsil
Hey foodies, I was wondering if you could recommend a good cookbook for me. I'm moving out soon, and I can't cook worth a damn. I screwed up my microwave oatmeal last night, to give you an idea of what we're working with here. But I'm going to have to learn to cook on my own here soon, so here are things I wanted in a cookbook.

-Healthy.
-Lots of fruits and vegetables
-Lots of rice
-Lots of fish, some chicken, not a lot of beef
-Not super complicated
-Slight Asian influence (not necessary, but I would like to make a few meals like this)

Recommend whatever sounds close to this that you know of. Thanks for your help, Food Board.

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:20 pm UTC
by Moo
I am very fond of a book called Fast Food. Here's the amazon.com link; but the amazon.co.uk version lets you look inside.

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:28 pm UTC
by Narsil
I like this a lot, and a copy can be had for around $5. Sold. Thanks a lot.

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:30 pm UTC
by Moo
My pleasure!!

Wow, that was fast. Maybe we should try world peace next...

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:33 pm UTC
by Narsil
You can, but in the mean time I'm also gonna try this "Veggie Food" book Amazon recommended.

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:34 pm UTC
by Moo
'K.

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 4:21 pm UTC
by PAstrychef
A nice general guide is Mark Bittman's How To Cook Everything. He focuses on the techniques that you can use on anything, and less on specific recipes. His Minimalist column and videos for the NYTimes.com are also nice.
Michael Rhulman just had [u]Ratios{/u] come out-it shows how using a set of simple ratios you can work up any end result you desire.
As you can tell, I'm much more a fan of learning technique than focusing on recipes.
Cook's Illustrated magazine is good for showing how and why things work or don't work.
You can check out lots of cookbooks at your local library-it's a great way to see if you'll like one before you spend money on it.
You might like the Look and Cook series-lots of helpful pictures! And there will someone giving cooking classes in your area-take a few and you'll be fine. (If you live near Chicago, email me and I'll set you up.)

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:50 pm UTC
by PatrickRsGhost
While I was in the grocery store, I saw this cookbook on the shelf. Thumbed through a couple of pages, and saw some very easy and cheap recipes in there, including one for stir-fry Ramen. The neat thing about that sir fry Ramen recipe was that it said you could use rice or regular noodles, but it would take a bit longer to cook.

PAstrychef wrote:Cook's Illustrated magazine is good for showing how and why things work or don't work.


As are the TV shows affiliated with it, America's Test Kitchen and Cook's Country. My parents and I never miss an episode.

Re: Narsil needs a cookbook, details inside

Posted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 10:05 pm UTC
by poxic
You could also try the Five in Ten cookbook, promising recipes with no more than five ingredients (excluding salt and pepper) and finished in ten minutes or less.

I bought the Five in Ten pasta book for a friend some years ago. He made me a dish with sundried tomatoes, basil and cream as a thank you dinner. The SDTs were awfully salty, which wasn't his fault, but it was tasty otherwise.