Successful food experiments

Apparently, people like to eat.

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btilly
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Successful food experiments

Postby btilly » Mon May 18, 2009 9:06 pm UTC

My son and his baby sitter were playing around with grinding oats and trying to make things from them. This got me to experimenting, and we wound up with a type of pancake that I'll be making more often:

Apple-Oat Pancakes
1 cup oat flour
1 cup applesauce
1/2 cup milk
1 3/4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp cinnamon

Mix, and cook pancakes. When you pour the batter you should spread it out a bit with your spoon. Good hot or cold.

I'm still playing with it. I'm not convinced I have the baking powder or salt completely right yet. I've also tried a variation with pureed peach in place of applesauce, and light cream in place of milk. My wife doesn't like the idea of that much cream, but those were also good. If you're vegan, they are also good after replacing milk with soy milk.

So what other simple cooking experiments turned out well for people?
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poxic
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby poxic » Mon May 18, 2009 10:20 pm UTC

Something I've come up with after years of coping with my food allergies. I fed it to my folks et al on Mother's Day and apparently people like it. This will feed 3 or 4 as a side dish, easily doubled as needed.

Asparagus-Sweet Potato Stuff

a tablespoon or so of olive oil (non-vegan option: butter)
couple of pinches of cumin
few pinches of turmeric
1 small onion, chopped small
optional: 1 to 3 cloves garlic, according to taste, minced or chopped
1 small yam/sweet potato, cubed
1 bunch asparagus, chopped into pieces a bit bigger than the cubes of yam
a handful or two of mixed nuts, your favourite kind, chopped or bashed into bits (I put them in a plastic bag and hit them with a hammer)

Warm the oil or butter over low heat. Throw in the spices and cook until they start to smell really good. Dump in the onions and optional garlic (see optional treatment of garlic below). Cook unil the onions are soft and translucent, stirring sometimes to keep things from sticking to the pan.

Dump in the yam/sweet potato. Cook gently, stirring gently sometimes, until the cubes are half-way soft. Add the asparagus. Continue to cook gently (we're trying to not turn the yam into mush) until everything is almost perfectly firm-soft to the bite. Take it off the heat (It will continue to soften a bit with the heat it's gathered) and layer it into a serving dish alternately with the chopped nuts. Or simply stir in the nuts and grab a fork. Whatever works.

Optional garlic treatment: if you love your garlic, use the full three cloves. Put in one clove's worth at the same time as the onion. When the onion is mostly translucent, but you're not ready to add the yam yet, add the next clove's worth. Let the onion and garlic cook until the onion starts to brown. Add the yam, then add the rest of the garlic. Continue as above.


When I make this for myself, I add beans, maybe some chopped tofu, some sunflower seeds and a couple of pinches of flax seeds (I'm mostly vegan and need my omega somethings). I usually use broccoli instead of asparagus, but it's nice to do the asparagus thing sometimes. I was actually surprised that people asked for seconds of the simplified version. I thought it had too many strong flavours together, but I guess it works.
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AntonGarou
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby AntonGarou » Tue May 19, 2009 8:34 pm UTC

I made scrambled eggs with both cubed kohlerabi(this vegetable- not sure of the English name) and apples that were delicious- the apples become a bit crunchy and sweet, and the kohlerabi become some what softer and nice. My girlfriend made scrambled eggs with cinnamon and eggplant that were great even cold.

I also found out that making Graten with half kohlerabi and half potatoes mix works really well- you work like a normal Graten but make half the layers kohlerabi and it gives a nice variation in texture.
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby poxic » Wed May 20, 2009 12:18 am UTC

I think we call it kohlrabi. I'm not sure what graten is, though -- potato pancakes?
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Zohar
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby Zohar » Wed May 20, 2009 5:44 am UTC

It's kind of like a potato casserole. Thin slices of potatoes arranged in layers in a pan (sometimes with layers of onion) and placed in the oven with various seasonings.
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby poxic » Wed May 20, 2009 5:48 am UTC

Ah, scalloped potatoes. Here it's usually made with a cream sauce and some cheese, occasionally bits of ham or whatnot.
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Zohar
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby Zohar » Wed May 20, 2009 6:19 am UTC

Yes, I think that's the usual sauce. I like plain olive oil and fresh rosemary, as well.
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby Gentlelady » Wed May 20, 2009 9:27 am UTC

Kohlerabi apparently is a member of the cabbage family. But is more close to the rutabaga.


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Zohar
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby Zohar » Wed May 20, 2009 9:31 am UTC

It's not so much like cabbage in flavor. And unlike cabbage which comes in leaves, it has a consistency more similar to an apple. It's a very juicy and refreshing vegetable.
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Brother Maynard
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby Brother Maynard » Thu May 21, 2009 3:13 pm UTC

I made scrambled eggs with red onions and cranberry sauce. The result was something of an accident, but the eggs provided a nice canvas for the sweet sauce to even out, while the pungent onion overtones somehow add to it.

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ssbookyu123
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby ssbookyu123 » Mon May 25, 2009 3:32 am UTC

Velvet potateos
I was low on time to make mashed potatos so I put 5 medium potatoes half a stick of butter and salt to taste and I left it on for like a minute or two and when I took it out instead of mashed it was almost pudding like and I have been making it ever since.

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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby poxic » Mon May 25, 2009 3:38 am UTC

In a food processor? My mother tried that once. It turned into pure starch soup...
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Re: Successful food experiments

Postby toshiro » Sat May 30, 2009 7:19 pm UTC

Just for the record: AntonGarou wrote Graten, when it should have been Gratin. It is very prominent in Swiss cuisine[citation needed], to eliminate leftovers (mashed potatoes, pasta, whatever).


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