Recipe requests

Apparently, people like to eat.

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Zohar
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Fri May 31, 2019 2:23 pm UTC

Are you talking about an enameled dutch oven? You can get a cast iron one for relatively cheap. You probably wouldn't use that one for broth though.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby sardia » Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:27 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:Are you talking about an enameled dutch oven? You can get a cast iron one for relatively cheap. You probably wouldn't use that one for broth though.

Why not? Long time over low heat. If it's not acidic, it shouldn't affect the seasoning at all. Maybe if it's new, you might get too much iron.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:13 pm UTC

I'm wary of having a lot of liquid in there, but I guess I wouldn't mind making a stew. It is conceivable I am wrong on that point!
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Quercus » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:51 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:I'm wary of having a lot of liquid in there, but I guess I wouldn't mind making a stew. It is conceivable I am wrong on that point!

I've used (well seasoned) cast iron for some quite long reductions and have never noticed an issue. I made a tomato based sauce in cast iron once or twice and that did affect the seasoning - but even then getting it really hot and wiping some vegetable shortening over it a couple of times fixed it right up (we have quite a minimalist kitchen out of choice and have precisely four pans of any description, so our cast iron skillets get pressed into service for things you wouldn't normally use them for quite a lot)

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby dubsola » Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:11 am UTC

Zohar wrote:Are you talking about an enameled dutch oven? You can get a cast iron one for relatively cheap. You probably wouldn't use that one for broth though.

I've always wanted a le creuset dutch oven. My mum had one and throughout my childhood I associate it with good food. I asked her for one for my 40th birthday but they are so ridiculously expensive. I'm hoping to find one at a garage sale one day. I will look at some cast iron options as that seems like a good middle ground. I do want to use it for making lots of tomato sauce one day though.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby sardia » Wed Jun 05, 2019 8:44 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:
Zohar wrote:Are you talking about an enameled dutch oven? You can get a cast iron one for relatively cheap. You probably wouldn't use that one for broth though.

I've always wanted a le creuset dutch oven. My mum had one and throughout my childhood I associate it with good food. I asked her for one for my 40th birthday but they are so ridiculously expensive. I'm hoping to find one at a garage sale one day. I will look at some cast iron options as that seems like a good middle ground. I do want to use it for making lots of tomato sauce one day though.

Just rebuild the seasoning layer when you're done cooking. It's not hard if you regularly use it. I don't even bother with other pans unless I'm making soup or pressure cooking.

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Sungura
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Sungura » Thu Jun 06, 2019 8:09 pm UTC

I love cast iron. We have even a cast iron pizza tray and Oh me yarm does it make ALL the difference! Seasoning isnt hard and its nice to not worry about scratching it or something.

So...lets say i love the taste or baklava. How can i get said taste without all the work? That pastry looks toughhhh to make
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Zohar » Thu Jun 06, 2019 8:31 pm UTC

You could try buying it, but I doubt that's what you're looking for. I wonder if you can replace the phyllo dough with store-bough puff-pastry dough? It won't be the same of course but maybe a not-terrible shortcut to make something delicious and baklava-adjacent?
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Jun 06, 2019 10:19 pm UTC

99% of the people making baklava use premade phyllo dough. There is a number on the box that tells how thick it is-the bigger the number, the thinner the sheet. Country style is the thickest. It’s not really more work than macarons.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby dubsola » Fri Jun 07, 2019 3:21 am UTC

Macarons are a bit of work though, no?

As an aside, baklava > macarons any day of the week.

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Sungura
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby Sungura » Sat Jun 08, 2019 2:11 am UTC

But they are delish!
Buying phylo ahhhh that sounds better lol. Hmm.
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Re: Recipe requests

Postby sardia » Sun Jun 09, 2019 4:36 pm UTC

PAstrychef wrote:99% of the people making baklava use premade phyllo dough. There is a number on the box that tells how thick it is-the bigger the number, the thinner the sheet. Country style is the thickest. It’s not really more work than macarons.

So the recipe is to brush oil onto a layer of premade phyllo dough, and then put down another layer on top? Could you make biscuits this way? Because I could never get my layers of biscuits right.

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Re: Recipe requests

Postby PAstrychef » Sun Jun 09, 2019 10:51 pm UTC

Usually it’s melted butter between the sheets of phyllo, not oil, but I suppose coconut oil will work if you’re vegan. The layers in biscuits come from the way the dough is mixed and rolled before cutting. I’ve found that rolling out biscuit dough then folding it in a letter fold before cutting results in more visible layering.
In the range of laminated doughs with croissants and puff pastry at one end and soda bread at the other, phyllo ends up laminated, but not as a part of the dough’s structure. Biscuits are near the middle, with definite separation of the flakes of butter and visible layers, but much less gluten development.
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