Need another epic fantasy....

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davej
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Need another epic fantasy....

Postby davej » Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:48 pm UTC

Mentioned on a different thread that I am reading 'A Song of Ice and Fire' epic fantasy, and currently on book 4 (the last released book, but not the last book in this series). I am going to buy The Three Kingdoms (or whatever that chinese novel is called) and read through that, but I was wanting to get another epic fantasy novel series thing which is completed. By completed, I mean that there will be no mored books coming out for it, or at least none planned at the moment. I looked into the Dune series, Black Company, and Malazan Book of the Fallen but they all look to still have new books coming out. Ender's game I wasn't sure about, so is that completed, or are they still adding more to it?

Please let me know of some.

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Postby Lyra Ngalia » Mon Sep 10, 2007 11:00 pm UTC

Ted Williams' Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn "trilogy" is epic beyond belief. In fact, I call it a trilogy only because the author does. The last volume is split into two books because it's too big to publish as one.

It consists of:
The Dragonbone Chair
Stone of Farewell
To Green Angel Tower (Part 1)
To Green Angel Tower (Part 2)


He also has another epic fantasy called Shadowmarch (I think), which is still being released, as well as a sci-fi epic called Otherland.

Do you consider Raymond Feist epic? I don't know if I do, but his story does seem to go on for forever.
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Postby Bakemaster » Mon Sep 10, 2007 11:27 pm UTC

Eddings is/are quite good:
The Belgariad, followed by the Mallorean and with a pair of prequels - 12 volumes altogether.
The Elenium and the Tamuli are consecutive trilogies of his (a separate series with a different setting).
I actually have never read the Belgariad. I first read the Mallorean, then the prequels, then the Elenium and Tamuli. The way he deals(/they deal) with how magic works in each of the two universes is fascinating.
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Postby Sulla158 » Tue Sep 11, 2007 1:19 am UTC

Dune is completed mostly. Frank Herbert wrote the original 7 books of the series. Now his son is writing prequels and i think now some sequels based on his notes. The 7 original books hold together pretty well as a series. The prequels add to the world, but the writing in my opinion anyway isn't as good as Frank Herbert's.

You might also look into the Foundation Series by Asimov if you're open to Sci-Fi. It has seven books and I think that his robot series is loosely related to it but not needed to get it.

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Postby b.i.o » Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:53 am UTC

Sulla158 wrote:Dune is completed mostly. Frank Herbert wrote the original 7 books of the series. Now his son is writing prequels and i think now some sequels based on his notes. The 7 original books hold together pretty well as a series. The prequels add to the world, but the writing in my opinion anyway isn't as good as Frank Herbert's.

You might also look into the Foundation Series by Asimov if you're open to Sci-Fi. It has seven books and I think that his robot series is loosely related to it but not needed to get it.


Frank Herbert wrote the original 6 books. They're the good ones. Don't bother with the others his son wrote.

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Tad Williams it is

Postby davej » Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:19 am UTC

Thank you all for your responses. I think I may go that Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn book set first. Think I will for sure have to check out Dune as well, if what you guys say about Dune being fairly rapped up after the 6th book, and that any new book doesn't add too much. I've hard a lot about it, so I better read it at some point or another. That book is what the computer game is based off of isn't it? I never really played it, so I don't really know it or it's story. Anyone play it? Does it follow along with the story well?

I'm fairly new to reading actually. I've only really ever read what was required of me, plus a few books like 1984 (one of, if not my favorite book). It's funny that my friend from up in Oregon actually gave me the The Game of Thrones and told me to read it, and that it was a great book. I started to read it, got about 70 pages in, then started having to do school work. Didn't pick it back up until 2 years later, and finished reading it. Then went out and bought the other 3 books right away. Now I'm reading those every night. Almost done.

Thanks again for your responses. Please continue to post, as I will be writing these down for future books/series to read.

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Postby ArchangelShrike » Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:34 am UTC

The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas.

It is probably my favorite book ever. It has everything you'll need in it, from a good adventure to fight scenes to intrigue and deception, it's been said that it was written by teams of writers, not just Dumas, and it could even be based on a true story. While the abridged version removes a lot of the tedium, and parts that doesn't mesh well with the whole story, there is one scene in the unabridged that is awesome and has been cut out of some abridged versions I've read. (The captured banker, anyone?) Nice and long too, since it looks like you're looking for something to keep your attention.

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Postby Jesse » Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:55 am UTC

Katharine Kerr's Deverry series is nearly complete. Thirteen books released, one final one to come in 2008.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deverry_cycle

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Postby taggedunion » Wed Sep 12, 2007 6:42 am UTC

I'll agree with the crapheap Brian Herbert has made out of his father's books. I mean, oy. Christopher Tolkien did it so much better.

I second (third? fourth?) Dune. I don't know if you've read Terry Goodkind, but his stuff is pretty okay. I mean, it's not like, tres excellent, but it seems sometimes the best you can get out of the fantasy genre.

So, all I really wanted to say was that Dune is freaking awesome.
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Postby Vekter » Wed Sep 12, 2007 5:47 pm UTC

Eragon.

Thread. Fucking. Over.
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Postby Jesse » Wed Sep 12, 2007 5:49 pm UTC

Vekter wrote:Eragon.

Thread. Fucking. Over.


Oh dear. Oh dear oh dear. Have you ever actually read the book?

It is not very good at all.

EDIT: After lengthy discussion, we have decided that there is only one solution that keeps our sanity intact.

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Postby Alisto » Wed Sep 12, 2007 6:13 pm UTC

Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan

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eragon, and the wheel of time

Postby davej » Wed Sep 12, 2007 8:16 pm UTC

From what I'm seeing, Eragon has only two books? Is this correct? i am assuming that these books are what the movie was based upon? Never saw the movie my self so I do not know anything about the books beside there is some kid and some dragon. Thanks for the suggestion.

The Wheel of Time does not seem to be completed yet from what I have read. Is the 12th book that is being made right now going to be the last? If so I may have to check this one out as well. I heard that at some points it is a really good read, while at others it is absolutely boring (read this in some other thread).

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Postby Victorkm » Wed Sep 12, 2007 8:28 pm UTC

Eragon is a Trilogy as stated so far. The movie was based on the first book. Only the first 2 books have come out and there has been like 5 years in between. They suck. Don't read them or watch the movie. Really.

Only reason I will read the third one is so I can finish the Starwars. I mean story.

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Postby Jesse » Wed Sep 12, 2007 8:34 pm UTC

Victorkm wrote:Only reason I will read the third one is so I can finish the Starwars. I mean story.


Oh man, there are many reasons that book is terrible, it using the Hero's Journey/Monomyth (Which I assume you are referencing with the 'starwars' line) is not one of them. George Lucas did not even invent it. I think Kurosawa was one of the first to use it in film, but it had been around even longer than that.

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Postby Narsil » Wed Sep 12, 2007 8:43 pm UTC

Argh. I made the mistake of reading Eragon when I was around 13 and all "lol dragenz are kewl" and then later read Eldest and realized just how crappy the series I was reading actually was.

I mean, seriously. This is just above Eyes of Argon level, or at least spawned from the same idea-hole (stupid teenager reads "The Lord of the Rings" and says "Hey, I can write that too! And [dragons/barbarians] are really neat and original in fantasy fiction!".

In short, I now have to read the next book. I need to know what happens and get that part of my life over with. But it would make sense if Paolini got to college with his jiga-millions and said "You know what, I already have several million dollars and I'm in college. There's girls and beer here. What do I need writing for?!".

tl;dr: I hope in typing out the last period of your book, Christopher Paolini, you have a severe heart attack and die.

Also, I second The Count of Monte Cristo full heartedly. Get the unabridged Wordsworth edition if possible. Yeah, the bastard's just pushing 1,000 pages, but every word is amazing. If you think only fantasy can affect you, you need to read this book. It's more epic and awe-inspiring than any fantasy novel I've ever read.
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Postby Victorkm » Wed Sep 12, 2007 8:59 pm UTC

Jesster wrote:
Victorkm wrote:Only reason I will read the third one is so I can finish the Starwars. I mean story.


Oh man, there are many reasons that book is terrible, it using the Hero's Journey/Monomyth (Which I assume you are referencing with the 'starwars' line) is not one of them. George Lucas did not even invent it. I think Kurosawa was one of the first to use it in film, but it had been around even longer than that.


Let me break it down:


Eragon and Luke are both raised in a backwoods untraveled environment by foster parents.
Eragon finds a dragon egg, Luke finds a pair of droids. Plot begins
Ben Kenobi/Bran discover the forbidden egg/droids and, since they had been tasked to keep an eye on Eragon/Luke since birth, become their mentor and teach them the way of the Jedi/Dragonriders.
Obi-Wan/Bran take Luke/Eragon away from their home which has now become dangerous to them.
Along the way they meet the dashing rogue Murtagh/Han Solo
On their way to the rebel base, they get waylaid into a rescue mission by their feelings for the captive princess Leia/Arya who they have seen in a recording/dreams.
Obi-Wan/Bran are killed by Durza/Vader in course of the rescue mission, but Leia/Arya get away with Luke/Eragon and Han/Murtagh
Eragon and Arya and Murtagh/Luke and Leia and Han make it to the rebel base where they are sieged by the forces of the dark emperor Galbatorix/Palpatine(Who are also dragonriders/Jedi)
During the siege, Luke/Eragon gets extremely lucky in defeating the enemy's liutenants Vader's tie/Durza.
There is an award ceremony for everyone involved.



And thats just the first book. I'm not even mentioning the second where Eragon goes into hiding with a trainer and eventually comes out of hiding to rescue his friends but is confronted and defeated by an enemy who he also didnt know was a family member.

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Postby davej » Wed Sep 12, 2007 9:10 pm UTC

Guess I no longer need to read eragon as I just got the plot from Victorkm's reply. Too hard not to read hidden text on your own thread you started. Either way from what it is sounding like is that eragon is horrible, and not worth the read.

Two questions however: Which is better, the book or the movie? Is it even suggested to rent the movie or see it in a dollar theater (if it is still in there?)?

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Postby SecondTalon » Wed Sep 12, 2007 9:22 pm UTC

Jesster wrote:
Victorkm wrote:Only reason I will read the third one is so I can finish the Starwars. I mean story.


Oh man, there are many reasons that book is terrible, it using the Hero's Journey/Monomyth (Which I assume you are referencing with the 'starwars' line) is not one of them. George Lucas did not even invent it. I think Kurosawa was one of the first to use it in film, but it had been around even longer than that.


Bad Jesster! Bad! The Monomyth was identified by Joseph Campbell, but invented by...

Jesus, the Mesopotamians? Whoever was before them? The first man-ape who said the equivalent of "Look, I was.. uh.. born of unusual circumstances, you see.."

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Postby Victorkm » Wed Sep 12, 2007 9:44 pm UTC

davej wrote:Guess I no longer need to read eragon as I just got the plot from Victorkm's reply. Too hard not to read hidden text on your own thread you started. Either way from what it is sounding like is that eragon is horrible, and not worth the read.

Two questions however: Which is better, the book or the movie? Is it even suggested to rent the movie or see it in a dollar theater (if it is still in there?)?


The movie is even worse. It doesn't keep to the plot of the book very well and the person who played Eragon played him as a petulant dickwad who sets a bad example for kids everywhere.

But really though, if you have to go with one, read the books. The second book deviates a lot from the Star Wars plot unlike the first, since Paolini was no longer 15 when he wrote it.

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Postby Jesse » Wed Sep 12, 2007 9:48 pm UTC

ST, your statement doesn't disagree with mine. Kurosawa was still the first to use it in film, and it had been around way longer than that.

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Postby Malice » Wed Sep 12, 2007 11:35 pm UTC

Try The Dark Tower series, by Stephen King. It's a very good, epic mix of fantasy, horror, and science fiction. Nice and long, too (7 books, written over 30 years). And finished.

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Postby Bakemaster » Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:15 am UTC

Also, Roger Zelazny's decology, The Amber Chronicles (or Chronicles of Amber, I don't remember which). Actually it might be more accurate to say two consecutive quintets, but whatever. The first book is Nine Princes in Amber unless you get the big ten-in-one volume. They're not terribly long individually.
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Postby ArchangelShrike » Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:38 am UTC

Ahh, those... I got a two book collection of them from my uncle, who was a major Science-Fiction/SciFi reader. Very interesting, fun to follow. Somehow I started reading Chronicles Two first, which completely three me off when I read Chronicles One.

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Postby Bakemaster » Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:31 am UTC

That's a cute typo that reminds me of the pledge-drive Victor Borge-a-thons PBS runs sometimes.
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Postby Alisto » Thu Sep 13, 2007 6:07 am UTC

The Wheel of Time book in progress is the last. Though there's no telling when it will get finished since Jordan is all kinds of sickly.

Fuck Dark Tower. It started out strong and turned into a Stephen King wankfest.
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Postby Brandon Sanderson » Thu Sep 13, 2007 7:15 am UTC

Okay, fine. This thread finally convinced me I just needed to go ahead and register for the forums. I can't resist a "Recommend an Epic!" thread, though.

Unfortunately, my trilogy isn't done yet (last one is in June), and my other book is a stand-alone, so I can't recommend mine to fit the bill. However, here are a few I'd suggest:

Melanie Rawn's Sunrunner books (A little heavy on the characters and not quite as epic, but with six books and kingdoms falling, I think they fit the bill. One of my favorite magic systems.)

Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials. (Read them before the movie comes out. First marketed as YA, I think anyone would like them. Fantastic worldbuilding.)
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Postby Victorkm » Thu Sep 13, 2007 11:04 am UTC

L.E. Modesitt writes a solid magic system, and his Recluse series is all but finished. I think he is still putting out a book for it every once in a while but the last book I read didnt really have much to do with the ones before it so you wouldn't be missing any of the story. The series jumps around a lot chronologically too, so the first book is actually the third to last I think chronologically.

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Postby Lyra Ngalia » Thu Sep 13, 2007 3:20 pm UTC

Brandon Sanderson wrote:Okay, fine. This thread finally convinced me I just needed to go ahead and register for the forums. I can't resist a "Recommend an Epic!" thread, though.

Unfortunately, my trilogy isn't done yet (last one is in June), and my other book is a stand-alone, so I can't recommend mine to fit the bill. However, here are a few I'd suggest:

Melanie Rawn's Sunrunner books (A little heavy on the characters and not quite as epic, but with six books and kingdoms falling, I think they fit the bill. One of my favorite magic systems.)

Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials. (Read them before the movie comes out. First marketed as YA, I think anyone would like them. Fantastic worldbuilding.)


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Postby Brandon Sanderson » Thu Sep 13, 2007 7:06 pm UTC

Victorkm wrote:L.E. Modesitt writes a solid magic system, and his Recluse series is all but finished. I think he is still putting out a book for it every once in a while but the last book I read didnt really have much to do with the ones before it so you wouldn't be missing any of the story. The series jumps around a lot chronologically too, so the first book is actually the third to last I think chronologically.


Lee's books are great reads, and Victorkm is right. He's said he never plans to write more than two books about any given characters in that series. So, while there are a LOT of books in the world of Recluse, they're all essentially stand alones or part of a two-book set. That makes them perfect for someone who wants epic scope (since they span generations) but doesn't want to feel like they have to wait forever to find out what happens.

*raises eyebrow* Are you really the Brandon Sanderson of Elantris?


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Postby Victorkm » Thu Sep 13, 2007 8:10 pm UTC

Building on what Brandon said, Modessitt has also written several different fantasy worlds, so if you like his style of writing, you've got plenty of reading ahead of you.

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Postby Amnesiasoft » Thu Sep 13, 2007 8:47 pm UTC

Malice wrote:Try The Dark Tower series, by Stephen King. It's a very good, epic mix of fantasy, horror, and science fiction. Nice and long, too (7 books, written over 30 years). And finished.

I second this. (I still haven't finished it though, got halfway through book 4...then my physics teacher took it from me because I was reading in class instead of doing the homework >_>, need to find a second copy)

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Postby @trophy » Thu Sep 13, 2007 8:48 pm UTC

LOL :dons asbestos underwear: Harry Potter?
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Postby Lyra Ngalia » Thu Sep 13, 2007 10:59 pm UTC

@trophy wrote:LOL :dons asbestos underwear: Harry Potter?


*starts flamethrower*

Just kidding.
In all honesty, I don't consider Harry Potter terribly epic, I think simply because the books are written at such a level that it's very easy to blow through them all quickly.

I also think they're a much more interesting sociological study than as novels, but that's just me.
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Postby @trophy » Fri Sep 14, 2007 12:42 am UTC

Lyra Ngalia wrote:I also think they're a much more interesting sociological study than as novels, but that's just me.


While I think they are a good sociological study, I also think they're good novels.
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Postby rxninja » Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:44 am UTC

I came here to suggest Amber and/or the Dark Tower series, but found that I have been beaten to the punch. Therefore, I second the recommendation for these two. Both deal with, to some extent, the fabric of all existence. It's hard to find something more epic.

Although in Lord of Light, the main character almost single-handedly wages war against an entire pantheon of "gods"...

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Postby Teria » Tue Sep 18, 2007 9:06 am UTC

If you don't mind reading an awesome book with not-that-much of wizards, dragons, magic etc, but awesome storytelling and weird relationships, then I'd say read Robin Hobbs Farseer trilogy and after The Liveship Traders trilogy and after that (or whatever) that The Tawny Man trilogy. It's total 9 books I know, but I really love them by myself.

All of the books are about the same world, The Tawny Man is continuing trilogy to The Farseer trilogy and The Liveship Traders doesn't really have anything to do with the other two trilogies, expect that there's one character that will appear in The Tawny Man, but.. Oh well.. Just read the book. It's amazing, that's all I have to say.

There's also 20 years time between The Farseer trilogy and Tawny Man trilogy.
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Postby Razzle Storm » Tue Sep 18, 2007 11:16 am UTC

Brandon Sanderson wrote:Melanie Rawn's Sunrunner books (A little heavy on the characters and not quite as epic, but with six books and kingdoms falling, I think they fit the bill. One of my favorite magic systems.)

Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials. (Read them before the movie comes out. First marketed as YA, I think anyone would like them. Fantastic worldbuilding.)


Seconded. The Sunrunner books are pretty good, and Rawn did a good job coming up with them. I suggest reading all the 6 (You don't need to read them in order, but they're better if you do).

Also putting support behind Dune and The Count of Monte Cristo. There's a lot of really good books that aren't just fantasy books that you can read. Catch-22, Don Quixote, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (just to name a few). I also suggest reading some of the classics. For example, Oliver Twist is a fairly fast read, and Dickens writing style is witty, which adds even more to the story he creates.

So yeah, lots of books out there. I'd almost encourage you not to start Dune right off the bat if you just started reading for fun, but it's your choice. The first three are fairly straightforward, but when I was younger (I think I might've been in middle school or just starting high school at the time), I managed to trudge my way through the 4th, 5th, and 6th books, but didn't find them that fun of a read, mainly because I didn't understand them. I came back years later after I had learned a lot more, and could grasp that there was a much larger philosophy and ideals discussion going on in those books, whereas previously I hadn't even been aware of anything but the fact that the books were really boring (to my mind then).

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Postby legion » Wed Sep 19, 2007 4:54 am UTC

Lord of Light, while short and only one book, is far more epic and moving than the entirety of the Lord of the Rings novels. In my opinion. I second it.

I would highly suggest that you pick up Lord of Light in addition to whatever other epics you're looking at getting. It's fantastic.

That's all.

*poof*

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Postby Lyra Ngalia » Wed Sep 19, 2007 6:02 am UTC

The caveat I have with Lord of Light (which I personally loved) is that it's written in a style that may be off-putting to a lot of people.

It suffers from the same problem as Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (another single novel that's extremely epic in scale) in that it mimics the writing style that it's based off of. The biggest complaint I've heard against Lord of Light from the people I've recommended it to is that the style is hard to get past, that it reads too much like it's been translated from a different language.

It's totally the point, but it can also surprise and deter people who weren't expecting it.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path... Only I will remain.


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