Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

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Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Subliminity » Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:11 am UTC

Okay:

I have a *really* good friend in Australia. I have enough money to go ($43,000 in my name, that my mom will let me use for whatever), and her family is willing to take me in for a month. The problem is...understandably, my mom (no dad, died 5 years ago) is completely adamant in her stance to not let me go. She is really, really overprotective. I can't go and walk across the street, or to school. It's...ridiculous. This is a really big deal for her, I know, letting me go halfway around the world...but I would be traveling as an unaccompanied minor, and her parents are really trustworthy and nice. This is something I would really like to do, and as I've never done anything extraordinary in my life, I think that this is a great opportunity.

Please don't tell me how delusional I am. Just help.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby ian » Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:30 am UTC

How old are you?

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby sje46 » Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:32 am UTC

He is very young. Cory, you know how I feel about this. . .I don't know what I can say.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Subliminity » Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:39 am UTC

Fourteen.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Sharlos » Fri Jun 12, 2009 11:36 am UTC

Are they friends you/your mother have met in person?

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Subliminity » Fri Jun 12, 2009 11:42 am UTC

Yes. The parents I have met.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Sungura » Fri Jun 12, 2009 12:40 pm UTC

Fourteen is very young. If i had a kid I wouldn't let them go halfway around the world by themselves unless it was with/to people I knew and trusted irl. Honestly, I don't think that's being overprotective, I think it's caring about the safety of her kid.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Cytoplasm » Fri Jun 12, 2009 1:00 pm UTC

I am somewhat in this situation. I am 17 and my mother still does not want me to go alone (or AT ALL) to the Netherlands or England (where I have some friends). She has met my friend from Holland and I even know some Dutch. It has taken lots to convinve her. You may not like it but...maybe ask her if she wants to come with (which can be a drag) or an older friend? I told my parents one of them can come with or an older friend. I am still working on things.

You could remind her that since you would be an U.M. that the airport has[i] to look after you on the plane (or at least I [i]think they do. Again, I am in your situation of wanting to travel and such).

If I figure anything else out, I'll let you know (it's not easy, but you know this). Good luck my fellow traveler! :D
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby GoodRudeFun » Fri Jun 12, 2009 1:20 pm UTC

Try and appeal to her sense of what is in your best interest. Tell her this would be an incredible learning experience and would help you grow as a person. Remind her, not harshly, that you will someday need to be an adult and that you can use this experience to learn more about being an adult.

You will also want to prove to her that you will be as safe as possible. Find out what bothers her about the whole thing, and prove to her that she has nothing to worry about. Give her statistics on unaccompanied minors flying between different countries if they show that you will be safe. Also make sure you can plan everything out so that you are as safe as possible, and that when you arrive your friends family will be there to pick you up immediately.

Most importantly, don't lie. Make sure you are completely truthful about your safety. Mothers can spot a lie a mile away. That and honestly you don't want anything horrible to happen to you either. Lying is a good way to increase your risks.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Adacore » Fri Jun 12, 2009 2:56 pm UTC

14 years old was the point at which my parents let me do whatever I wanted, so long as I explained and justified it to them fully. I never did anything that long distance, but I did have unaccompanied European flights when I was that age to visit relatives. The crux of the issue, for me at least, would be whether there's definitely (100% for sure, guaranteed) going to be someone completely trustworthy at the other end to pick you up from whatever airport you'd end up at and make sure you're ok. That means, at least from my perspective, it's unlikely to happen unless you're going to stay with relatives or friends your parents know well.

Now, if, as you say, your parents do know these friends well enough to trust them that much, I'd say there's not much of a problem with it. A flight is a flight, no matter what the distance, it's the sort of thing that's actually pretty difficult to screw up or end up going wrong with because of all the security and double checks. You just go on the plane, watch movies for hours, then get off the other end. If your parents are worried about you travelling alone, I think quite a lot of airlines can arrange some form of chaparone for you to get from check-in to the plane and as soon as the airline crew realise you're an unaccompanied minor they'll be making sure you're ok, in general.

The situation of you actually staying away from home is purely a relationship of trust between your mother and both you and your guardians while you're away. The same trust thing I mentioned before. Generally, though, parents looking after a friend's child will be considerably more careful than parents looking after their own kids, so imo there's not much to worry about so long as there are responsible adults your mother trusts.

That all applies only for me, though, of course. I can't tell your mother what to think.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby SDIX » Fri Jun 12, 2009 4:14 pm UTC

Well you know I am quite motherly ;) so you know how I will feel already.
I would be terrified if my 14yo wanted to go across the world.

Now you say you have met her parents, but your mom has not met any of them? Would you be willing to fly your mom there to meet them, maybe stay the weekend, and then she fly back? Would that be at all possible? I would explain to her exactly why, in detail, you want to go- as if you were writing an essay for school :P and tell her what all you would do there, how it would be beneficial to you, etc etc etc.

You can't expect her to let you go if you are going to "shack up" with a girl "and her family" for a month in another country and bum around all day. Give her a reason she would want you to go.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby semicharmed » Fri Jun 12, 2009 4:30 pm UTC

So you've met this friend's parents, but has your mom? How long have you known this friend/how well do you know her parents?
I can understand why you're frustrated, but I can also pretty easily see your mom's side of things. At 14, even with the amount of money that's yours, you'd be almost entirely dependent on the friend's parents for things. I don't think you'll be able to rent a hotel room, or a car, in Australia — I know you wouldn't be able to in the U.S. I think, if I were in your mom's position, that would be my biggest hesitation — not trusting you to make this trip, but trusting that the friend & her parents are really as nice & trustworthy as you say, and that they were absolutely and completely willing to have you come for an extended visit. It honestly wouldn't be about the flights at all, but on the people end.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby EnderSword » Fri Jun 12, 2009 5:45 pm UTC

I would be surprised if a lot of 14 y/o guys were allowed to go spend the night at a 14 y/o girl's place down the street for a night, let alone in Australia for a month.

The fact the girl's parents are allowing it seems to speak to their judgement skills as well.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Von Haus » Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:57 pm UTC

Subliminity wrote:Please don't tell me how delusional I am. Just help.

Well how can I not offer an opinion now? Not wanting her child to go alone to Australia does not make your mum over protective, it makes her just like every other parent in the world (okay 99.99999% of them). Just try to think what it would be like from her perspective. A whole month worrying that you may be hurt or killed, every time she wakes up she could well think "Has something happened while I was asleep, is he ok, oh my god he might be dead, what will I do if he's dead??" Do you really want to put her through that every day for a whole month? You said it's a really big deal for her, so you know she's going to be worried beyond belief about you constantly if she does give in and let you go, also take into account if arguing with her about this, and pushing and pushing for it will upset her whether you go or not. Yeah, you probably won't get hurt and it will have a great time, but to say you've never done anything extraordinary in your life and that this is a great oportunity, yeah it is, and maybe you haven't. But very very few people would have done anything like this, you're not going to like this, but your 14, you still have your entire life to do amazing things in. That is not a good reason to go and do this.
I am NOT saying don't do this, I am all for adventure and living life to the full, that you even feel like you want to do this on your own at 14 is commendable. I wouldn't have had the balls to book flights get to an airport and fly half way around the world on my own when I was 14. All I want you to do is make yourself absolutely certain that you are really thinking about what you are doing, not just how it's going to benefit you but also what it's going to be like for your mum. I mean that, really really think what it's going to be like for her with you away, and then ask yourself truthfully if you want to put her through that or if waiting a couple of years before doing this wouldn't be a better idea. When you get to say 16, she will quite likely find it a lot less worrying, and if this girl really is "a *really* good friend", she'll still be there in two years, and by then you'll both be old enough and responsible enough to make the most of being out there, (I've realized that sound's pretty dodgy, I have no idea if that's what you're wanting with her or not, i'll assume not.), two years can make a lot of difference to what you value as a person and what you'll get out of the trip.

If you think about all of this, way up the good points and the bad points for you and for everyone else, and still are desperate to make this journey right now. My strongest recomendation would be take a friend with you, that would provide other parents for your mum to worry with to stop her bottling up concern, will make the flight more enjoyable, make your mum more likely to say yes, and on top of that, the Australian will have her own friends too, she won't be stopping seeing them for a month just because you are there, and having a friend you know really well come with you on the trip will make metting all those new people a lot easier too. Basically I think taking a friend with you would definately be worth considering. I'm sure if her parent's were willing to have someone stay with them for a month, they'd be understanding if you wanted to bring a good friend with you.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Bobber » Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:59 pm UTC

I am in a similar situation, although the opposite. I am eighteen, and am going to stay with some friends in Florida for 40 days in a couple of weeks. I ordered the tickets six months ago, when I was seventeen. My parents and immediate family have been supportive about it the entire time. Even more awesome is that one of my friends from over there actually came here first: he is asleep in my bed behind me right now.

That said, I can see that the situation you're in is completely different. Have you considered letting your mother speaking to the girl and her parents so find out how nice people they really are? Use Skype or something - land line calls from the US (you're in the US, right?) to Australia are probably really expensive. That way, if she/they have a webcam, your mother can see them too, which might easy her worries a bit. Talking to "some voice" is one thing, but actually seeing people, their body language and some of their home makes it all more real.

I can't see how there could be any problems with the flight there. Unless your mother is extremely paranoid about planes and their safety, what she's the most worried about is probably the stay itself. Try doing what I wrote in the above paragraph, but you have to do something yourself, too: thirty days is a long time, so you have to really consider if you think that you'll be able to hang out for a month without growing tired on each other. You should probably also consider your feelings towards her, talk it out with her, and if the situation in reality is as it could be, and sounds like to me, refer to her as your girlfriend instead of just friend to your mother to let her know what's up.

I wish you luck coming to an agreement, but remember: an overprotective mother is better than an apathetic mother.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby unknown604 » Sat Jun 13, 2009 3:27 am UTC

I've been in a similar situation, and I can safely say:

You're delusional, but then again, so was I when I decided to spend my Grade 11 year living with Best Friend and her boyfriend, albeit it was just up the street, but I suppose that the sheer amount of time I wasn't at home makes up for the close distance to family. And to my credit, I only visited once in a blue moon to get paperwork signed, not like my middle-aged aunt that stops by everyday to pick up food and the like.

Subliminity wrote:I have a *really* good friend in Australia.

How good of a friend is this *really* good friend?
When I moved in with Best Friend, we had known each other for a solid decade. My parents were fond of her; our parents, her's and mine, thought that we were either dating, sexing each other up or engaged/married or some mix of the three, even though we were obviously not.

All in all, we were are family.

The big thing here is, how well does your mother know your friend?

Side note: The Penguins just won the cup. Fuck.

Subliminity wrote:her parents are really trustworthy and nice

Does your mother know that her parents are "really trustworthy and nice"? I'm sure that her getting to know them a bit better would do miracles for your cause.

Subliminity wrote:I've never done anything extraordinary in my life, I think that this is a great opportunity

Great opportunity, yeah, obviously.
The best way to con her into letting you go is to ween her off the contact.
Act up, sneak away during the day, push her boundaries bit by bit.
Sooner or later, she'll get used to it. Hopefully she does by the end of the summer.

And you're right, this is a great opportunity, especially if this "really good friend" is more than just a friend. :wink:
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby wing » Sat Jun 13, 2009 5:33 am UTC

First, let me ask this - how in the name of GOD does a 14 year old have $43,000? That's the annual income of my entire freaking family.

I'm quite the traveler myself and have been for quite some time - and my mother, rest her soul, objected to every one of those trips - and I'm 22. But putting your mother's concerns aside, because they are what they are and there's really nothing you can do to change them...

So, with my 7 years of experience running around the world sleeping in other people's beds, here are MY concerns:

1) 30 days!?!?!? What the bloody hell do you intend to do there for 30 days? ESPECIALLY with no transportation (and if you think her parents will take you places, you're sorely mistaken). In my younger days, I tried to get along like that - and most of the time I ended up essentially just being an extra person living in their house doing to same crap I do everyday at MY house, except with different people and scenery around. Having done this extensively, I can tell you that, while slightly surreal, it is by no means extraordinary or a great opportunity.

And then came the magical discovery of the bus. It's possible to have a good time by abusing the bus network (if there is one), but it's horribly inefficient. You NEED ground transportation of your own for any sort of extended trip.

And even then, around day 11 or 12 it gets to the "Okay, this is starting to get old and routine" point (yes, even when I'm with the love of my life or my best friends in the entire universe).

2) If the two of you haven't had any serious extended facetime yet, this is asking for trouble. I've seen way too many relationships and friendships crushed by the "Oh me yarm LETS MOVE IN TOGETHER!" idea (and that's exactly what you're doing, as we discussed in the previous point) - and every single one of them collapsed before the 1 month mark.

3) Relax. You're not being oppressed. Your mother, despite any craziness related to not letting you cross the street by yourself, has a point here. You clearly haven't thought these plans through all that far, but there's absolutely no reason why you can't modify and improve your proposal (personally, I suggest you start by compromising on the time, since that can be seen as a HUGE concession on your part and ) and doing so very well could send the message that you're mature enough to handle this.

As it is now, you're not ready for initiation into the holy brotherhood of road warriors, nomads and vagabonds. Age and experience will bring you to that point.

4) Failing all else, why not take mom? A short "hi, this is my friend, these are her parents and they really aren't creepy psychomurderers like the TV news says everyone on the internet is" trip, a couple days long, could quite possibly pay off in the long run (you know, for when you're older and can procure ground transportation)
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby smw543 » Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:15 pm UTC

I have to agree with wing; Australia isn't an inherently magical place or anything. I actually did spend a month there (though I was 17 at the time, and it was with my uncle, though we interact more like friends [/tangent]) and it went much like he was saying. When you get there, it's new and your hosts are excited to see you. But after a week or two, you become a fixture, as if you've always been there, which leads to being treated as if you always will be there. You all get to saying "Oh, there's no rush to go see [some landmark], we have a whole month." I at least had the advantage of being old enough that I could walk/bike/bus to places (and meet interesting people; strangers are less inclined to talk to 14-year-olds. But then, you may not be the go-to-strange-places-and-meet-interesting-people type, so YMMV.) By the way, where in Australia are you going? That place is about the size of the continental U.S. and your experience in Perth may vary widely from your experience in Melbourne or especially some rural town.

However, if the speculation is correct and this is your girlfriend (for varying definitions of girlfriend) then this trip isn't really about seeing Australia, it's about seeing her. If that's the case, maybe she can come to you? Or even if you are just friends, that could still be an option. If your mom meets her and "approves," she may become more open to you going there in the future. It's certainly a better option than bringing your mom with you; it doesn't sound like you have much to worry about financially, but that would be a pretty excessive way to spend $1000 (Never mind... Jesus Christ the fares have dropped a lot in a few years!) The offer may not take (she may have plans or simply not want to go) but it should at least show how serious you are about it.
unknown604 wrote:The best way to con her into letting you go is to ween her off the contact.
Act up, sneak away during the day, push her boundaries bit by bit.
Although I'm thoroughly convinced this person is some combination of mentally disturbed and stupid, he/she did make me think of a loosely related point; although being a worrier isn't curable, it is a treatable condition. My mom was very protective when I was younger, but over time, I've managed to prove to her that I'm responsible. When I was your age, she got upset when I went to Wal-Mart, which is right next door to our neighborhood and requires no street crossing. Now, I'm taking a trip to Japan with a few friends in which we're planning to hike from Osaka to Tokyo, spending the night wherever we happen to be at sun down, and she's OK with it. (Granted, a 20/21 year old doesn't need his mom's permission for anything, but it says a lot that she trusts me and isn't too worried.) It won't happen overnight, but after seeing time and again that you come back fine from doing things she had doubts about, she'll start to see that you can handle yourself in the real world.

It would also help greatly if you could get an adult (preferably a relative or friend of the family that she knows and trusts) to back you up; that was a major factor in getting my mom to loosen up. (And if they all agree with your mom, it could be a sign that you really aren't ready for something like this; they know your situation better than we do.) Good luck, I hope this works out for you.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Subliminity » Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:52 pm UTC

Thanks, everyone. :)

If I went, I would be going to Melbourne, and yeah, it is more about seeing her than just going to Australia, obviously. Or else I really wouldn't be talking about her. xD I really would like to go see Australia just to say I have as well, though. I think I'll take the advice to just spend at most a few weeks there...even though she's convinced me that a month won't be nearly enough, and that I have to stay for at least two (as much as I would like that), I imagine that it would start to feel a bit humdrum after a while. I've considered asking my mom as well, but I know that I wouldn't have nearly as much freedom when I got there. After all, my friend's family would definitely know their way around quite a lot better than my mom would, so I wouldn't be as restricted in what I can do. I *really, REALLY* would like to go go without her. It would just be a way better experience overall. xD I guess I could try and have some patience until I get a bit older, say sixteen or so, and grow in maturity and manage to gain some trust with my Mom and make her confident in the fact that I'll come back okay. :)

I do know a few of my mom's friends who think that she's overprotective. I should talk to them...they'd be willing to talk to my mom, I bet. Like an intervention or something. >_>

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby mrbaggins » Sun Jun 14, 2009 1:33 am UTC

Dude, invest that cash, and in 3 years, you can make the trip, hire your own car, drive it around, and still have the same amount of cash at the end of it!
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Levi » Fri Jun 19, 2009 11:04 am UTC

EnderSword wrote:I would be surprised if a lot of 14 y/o guys were allowed to go spend the night at a 14 y/o girl's place down the street for a night, let alone in Australia for a month.

The fact the girl's parents are allowing it seems to speak to their judgement skills as well.


What exactly are you suggesting here? That the girl's parents are going to leave them unsupervised? Nobody I know would leave them alone EVER. AT ALL. (Which I find disturbing. I can't understand why they think two teens are going to start going at it the minute no one can see them, even if they just met.)

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby doogly » Fri Jun 19, 2009 1:19 pm UTC

Man, bunch of haters in the thread! Way more than a fraction of a per cent of parents would let you peace out. My parents' likely response would have been to give me their camera.

Talking it down to two weeks might work? Or if she does two weeks with you, and then you scoot down? Swapping would let your mother meet the girl (parents?). In any case, sounds like you should have a fantastic time. I hope something works out.

And ignore Mr. Baggins. Has the last year of financial news taught him nothing? And in general, live for today. The end is near.

Levi wrote: (Which I find disturbing. I can't understand why they think two teens are going to start going at it the minute no one can see them, even if they just met.)


And why is that disturbing? Is the notion that someone under 18 might have a sex life so abhorrent? I'd be more disturbed if they didn't. They might need their red blood cell count checked.
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Aleri » Sat Jun 20, 2009 5:57 pm UTC

I just got back from Melbourne, coincidentally also paid for with my dad's life insurance (my mother was nervous as hell about the whole trip). Small world.

Overall, Melbourne is a very safe city. I agree that it would help your case to show your mother all of the things you'd like to do there. Maybe there is a weeklong summer camp that you and your friend could go to together? I remember seeing one for high school students in the Grampian Mountains. Melbourne is fun but the great part about Australia is the outback! I would definitely recommend getting out of the city at some point. Oh, and make sure you make it down to Phillip Island to see the penguins :) The public transportation there is very good by US standards, and you can very easily get by without a car if you want to stay in the city. That said, the best stuff is all outside the city imo. There is a great nature sanctuary/zoo in Healsville where you can pet Kangaroos and stuff, but it's about a hour's drive and the train doesn't go that far out.

When I was 15, I convinced my mom to let me go camping in Colorado for two weeks with friends. It took about a year to convince her, but what worked best was that I put together a "presentation" of exactly what the trip would look like, who I would be with, where we would be going, safety precautions, etc. I also got her on the phone with any adults involved with the trip. It's hard to trust a "mystery adult", but hearing an actual voice helps a lot. Not only was the trip less scary when she knew what it would entail, but putting all of that effort into a presentation tells your mom that A) This is important to you, B) You are mature enough to develop a good plan, C) You've thought everything through, and this isn't just a whim

Suggestions: Find out the prices for local attractions, travel insurance, travel health insurance, transportation. All of that "adult" stuff. Be on your best behavior from now on (you don't need to suck up to her, but show her that you're independent and trustworthy). If you can arrange for a summer camp or some kind of supervised/organized trip for high school age people, that would help a lot imo.

There's a group called People to People International that arranges trip for high school age people (and you can call yourself a "student ambassador" when you apply to college). My brother went to London for 2 weeks when he was about your age. http://www.ptpi.org/

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Cytoplasm
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Cytoplasm » Mon Jun 22, 2009 6:41 pm UTC

Sorry chap, even though I found and amazling cheap ticket, she freaked out again and wouldn't let me go. It will be two or more years until I see my love at this rate. It's already been over a year. Hoorah. :(
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby mastered » Mon Jun 22, 2009 7:54 pm UTC

I understand your pain. However, we've always traveled a lot, so when I was maybe twelve I went across the country for a week. Still haven't done international, though. Try the 'special learning experience' card?
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby sparks » Mon Jun 22, 2009 8:35 pm UTC

Levi wrote:
EnderSword wrote:I would be surprised if a lot of 14 y/o guys were allowed to go spend the night at a 14 y/o girl's place down the street for a night, let alone in Australia for a month.

The fact the girl's parents are allowing it seems to speak to their judgement skills as well.


What exactly are you suggesting here? That the girl's parents are going to leave them unsupervised? Nobody I know would leave them alone EVER. AT ALL. (Which I find disturbing. I can't understand why they think two teens are going to start going at it the minute no one can see them, even if they just met.)


From the whole feel of the thread, it sounds like he and his family aren't exactly bffs with the girl's family. The fact is that there are wackos out there, and more sensible parents would try to get to know the boy was trustworthy enough before allowing him to stay over, because it doesn't sound like they know him very well (and they also live in an entirely different continent, so "knowing" is very relative).

Honestly, I don't think his mom is being overprotective on this one. OP doesn't sound like the most life experienced and battle hardened person, really, and I think 99% of parents probably wouldn't allow their sheltered 14 year old son to travel halfway round the world to visit people they don't even know in person. I suppose the most that can be done is getting the OP's mother and these parents on the phone or somehow in touch, to make sure they get to know each other and OP is allowed to visit them in a year or two. It just seems like this mother is being overprotective because she is so in other occasions, but this is honestly common sense.
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Aetius
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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby Aetius » Sat Jun 27, 2009 8:29 am UTC

"Mom, don't be a cockblock, seriously."

No matter what her objection, respond with this phrase. Increase the emphasis on the word "seriously" with each iteration. If the internet has taught us anything it's that you can browbeat anyone into submission with enough copy pasta.

If you object to this strategy on the grounds of "I can't call my mom a cockblock," then you aren't nearly old enough. If you can't admit to your mother (or possibly even to yourself) what your real intentions are here (namely to go galavanting off to join the Australian division of the French Foreign I-hope-this-won't-give-me-Lesions) then you have no business having sex in the first place.

Besides, $43,000 is a nice chunk of change, go buy yourself a foreclosed home and own a bachelor pad all through high school. Or like, invest it wisely or something.

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Re: Convincing mom to let me stay with friends in Australia?

Postby sparks » Sat Jun 27, 2009 12:59 pm UTC

Aetius wrote:"Mom, don't be a cockblock, seriously."

No matter what her objection, respond with this phrase. Increase the emphasis on the word "seriously" with each iteration. If the internet has taught us anything it's that you can browbeat anyone into submission with enough copy pasta.

If you object to this strategy on the grounds of "I can't call my mom a cockblock," then you aren't nearly old enough. If you can't admit to your mother (or possibly even to yourself) what your real intentions are here (namely to go galavanting off to join the Australian division of the French Foreign I-hope-this-won't-give-me-Lesions) then you have no business having sex in the first place.

Besides, $43,000 is a nice chunk of change, go buy yourself a foreclosed home and own a bachelor pad all through high school. Or like, invest it wisely or something.



ROFL.
Have you ever considered taking up a job as a counsellor, perchance? It would be your careerpath to success.
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