Questions For The World

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Djehutynakht
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Djehutynakht » Mon Jun 04, 2012 6:59 am UTC

Here's one thing I've always been curious to ask.... but frankly it's always seemed awkward to say in person.

I was thinking about Funeral Practices... a bit later I was thinking of the Holocaust... and I just had this nagging question.

Cremation is a practice which (I think) is becoming much more popular and common than ever before. It seems that there are tons who just have their dead cremated these days, as opposed to, say burying.

I was just wondering... has the Holocaust affected the cremation rate/attitude of cremation amongst the Jewish Population? (Israel I suppose if you want to pin it to a physical location, but among Jewish demographics in general). I know that there are, for those who follow their religion, specific burial practices (which I don't think allow cremation, but I may be wrong). But for many who are secular/Jewish only in anceastry and would otherwise not follow relgious practices very closely.... what are the facts with cremation? Do people of Jewish descent (those who aren't bound to relgious guidelines for burial) consider it a huge definite no when considering post-mortem options taking into account its place in Jewish history? Is it considered taboo? Does nobody care?

This is just one of those really strange questions which has been popping up every few weeks in my head for a few months now.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby firechicago » Mon Jun 04, 2012 6:16 pm UTC

Djehutynakht wrote:Here's one thing I've always been curious to ask.... but frankly it's always seemed awkward to say in person.

I was thinking about Funeral Practices... a bit later I was thinking of the Holocaust... and I just had this nagging question.

Cremation is a practice which (I think) is becoming much more popular and common than ever before. It seems that there are tons who just have their dead cremated these days, as opposed to, say burying.

I was just wondering... has the Holocaust affected the cremation rate/attitude of cremation amongst the Jewish Population? (Israel I suppose if you want to pin it to a physical location, but among Jewish demographics in general). I know that there are, for those who follow their religion, specific burial practices (which I don't think allow cremation, but I may be wrong). But for many who are secular/Jewish only in anceastry and would otherwise not follow relgious practices very closely.... what are the facts with cremation? Do people of Jewish descent (those who aren't bound to relgious guidelines for burial) consider it a huge definite no when considering post-mortem options taking into account its place in Jewish history? Is it considered taboo? Does nobody care?

This is just one of those really strange questions which has been popping up every few weeks in my head for a few months now.


Cremation was strongly condemned in Jewish law long before the holocaust. (It was considered a violation of both the duty to respect the dead and the duty to bury them quickly.) Some liberal branches of Judaism have modified that proscription to "we frown on this, but we won't actually refuse to let your ashes be buried in a Jewish cemetery," but that's only the more liberal branches. So an observant, religious Jew definitely would not be cremated. For non-religious Jews, opinion varies. Some see cremation as disrespectful for exactly the reasons you state, some don't care. I suspect you'll find as many different opinions as you would in any other large population. Maybe they're somewhat more anti-cremation, but it's hard to say to what extent that's because of the holocaust and to what extent it's just because of tradition.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby WanderingLinguist » Mon Jun 04, 2012 7:14 pm UTC

Giant Speck wrote:The Korean system you describe sounds like what we in America call eChecks. Basically, you give the company the routing number (which identifies the bank) and the account number. This is how I pay my monthly rent. This is also how PayPal usually works, though you can set PayPal to use your credit or debit card instead of a direct transfer from your bank account.


It's not the same thing. With what you describe, you are authorizing the payee to remove the money from the account directly. Here in Korea, you actually have to send the money yourself. In other words, you are given the recipient's bank name and account number and you make the payment.

The other difference with eChecks is that you can only send them to an individual who uses the same bank; if you try to send them to someone who uses a different bank, I'm pretty sure (unless it has changed in the three years I've been away) that the bank actually prints and mails a physical check on your behalf.

In Korea, you can do a bank transfer to any account at any bank as long as you know the account number. You can do it from any ATM, or from internet banking (though ATMs are usually by far the easier option if you're not a Windows/IE user).

I thought the Korean system was pretty strange too, at first. But I think I like it better now that I'm getting used to it. Because most transactions don't go through the credit card processing system, most transactions are instantaneous. That means no waiting for something to clear, no risk of overdrawing your account, and so on. The drawback is that if you have a real credit card (usable outside of Korea) there are usually some restrictions on it because the risk to the bank is higher.

There are other funky things about the Korean system too, like there is a machine in the bank for paying utility bills: You put the paper bill in the machine and it OCRs it, and then you can pay from your account. Or, for example, you can put your bank book in the ATM instead of a debit card (bank books have a magnetic strip like a credit card). In addition to performing the normal transaction (withdrawal, deposit, transfer) it also prints the transaction in the bank book.

(Please keep in mind I'm not an expert on this)

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Suzaku » Wed Jun 06, 2012 7:48 am UTC

Adacore wrote:Question! Payment methods, especially for things online.

In the UK, the two standards for online payment are credit card and debit card payments. Normally both are accepted, and almost everyone in the UK has at least one of each. In Korea, one of the most common methods appears to be direct bank transfer - vendors give you a bank name and account number and you manually do the transfer from your bank (either from their website, or using pretty much any ATM). You tell the vendor your name and account number in return, so they can match the incoming transfer with the transaction. This system seems really weird to me - does it (or something similar) exist elsewhere?

I believe the most common system in mainland Europe is debit card-based, whereas in the US it's mostly credit cards? How does online payment work in other places?

This is the exact same system that's used in Japan. You can send money this way to anyone who has a bank account, not just businsesses, as long as they give you the details. Fees (per transaction) vary depending on the amount and whether it's the same or a different bank you're sending to. And you can do the transaction online (if you have internet banking turned on), on the phone via IVR (if you have that function turned on), at ATMs, or over the counter.

Having lived for most of my adult (i.e. paying for things with my own money) life in Japan, I was shocked that you couldn't do this as simply back in Australia.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Steax » Wed Jun 06, 2012 8:04 am UTC

I can conclude that it's an East Asian thing, then. I know it applies in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Taiwan... If Japan and Korea also do that, then it's probably locally around here.

Now I wonder how Indians do it.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby AJR » Wed Jun 13, 2012 11:18 pm UTC

In the UK it is perfectly possible to make direct transfers between most bank accounts, and usually this is available over the phone and online, you just need the recipient's account number & sort code (essentially part of the account number which identifies (originally, at least) the specific bank branch where the account is based.) Bank transfers are pretty standard here for business-to-business payments, but not so much for consumer purchases - as well as being easy for businesses to accept, credit cards give the buyer extra protection if the seller doesn't deliver, as in many situations the credit card company is legally liable for any problems. (E.g. if you pay for flights in advance by credit card and the airline closes down, you can claim a refund from the credit card company and it's up to them to recover whatever they can from the airline.)

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Wed Jun 13, 2012 11:46 pm UTC

Yeah, the weird thing with bank transfer here, really, is how open people are with their account details. Invitations to ticketed Facebook events, or just posters for events on the streets, frequently have the account number and bank of the organiser listed on the (public) event page, so you can buy your ticket in advance by sending them money. The same is true of small business webpages - they'll have their account number prominently displayed on their homepage. For example, I went skiing over the winter using this company; the red number at the bottom of the box on the left of their homepage is a bank account number.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Dantez » Sun Jun 24, 2012 9:00 am UTC

Zarq wrote:I'm not sure if this is really location related, but it is something that I've seen a wide range of answers to: how many times do you change pants? (specifically jeans). I've seen answers ranging from "Jeans need to be washed?" to "Every day, two days max" (and some guy saying girls look funny at you if you mention you wear jeans more than once between washings).

Me: 1-2 times a week. Let's say 3 times in two weeks. (Location: Belgium)


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Re: Questions For The World

Postby webzter_again » Sun Jun 24, 2012 2:48 pm UTC

Dantez wrote:I change all my clothes once a week, except for underwear, of course.


Ewww, why would you wear your underwear for longer than a week? :D

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Steax » Sun Jun 24, 2012 3:01 pm UTC

Since I live in the steamy tropics, most shirts only last a day. Pants, however, can last way longer... sometimes months just being air-dried, assuming they're just for casual use (i.e. not for walking into a room and sitting down to talk to people).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ArchaicHipster » Sun Jun 24, 2012 4:18 pm UTC

With me (and my family), the rule has always been shirts, underwear, socks et cetera are one day then wash, trousers are two days, or three max. This didn't change throughout my childhood, which has involved massively humid climates (Hong Kong), quite temperate climates (mainland China) and...well, Scotland. :P
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Tue Jul 17, 2012 3:38 pm UTC

In the UK, are you even allowed to have fireworks?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Tue Jul 17, 2012 4:20 pm UTC

Yes.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Whelan » Tue Jul 17, 2012 4:40 pm UTC

There's a shop near me that sells them. Supermarkets get in on the act near the traditional firework times.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby JohnGalt » Tue Jul 17, 2012 5:52 pm UTC

Zarq wrote:I'm not sure if this is really location related, but it is something that I've seen a wide range of answers to: how many times do you change pants? (specifically jeans). I've seen answers ranging from "Jeans need to be washed?" to "Every day, two days max" (and some guy saying girls look funny at you if you mention you wear jeans more than once between washings).

Me: 1-2 times a week. Let's say 3 times in two weeks. (Location: Belgium)


I've been wondering about this myself recently. I wash my jeans about once a week, shorts once every 3 wears. Shirts, socks and underwear are one-wear only. However I have a housemate who wears everything only once. In winter, that means his jeans, socks, shirts, underwear and tops (jackets/jerseys/hoodeys) are only worn once, even the clothes he sleeps in a are washed regularly. Its such a ridiculous waste of water and electricity if you ask me, especially since all of it gets tumble-dried. I think clothes should be washed as infrequently as possible to minimise wear

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Endless Mike » Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:15 pm UTC

I wear raw jeans, so I try to wash them as little as possible. If they start to get funky, I give them a soak in hot water. If that doesn't help, then they get washed.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Tue Jul 17, 2012 11:40 pm UTC

emceng wrote:In the UK, are you even allowed to have fireworks?

You have to be 18 to buy them and, at least near where I lived, they were pretty strict with that age limit. Some specialist shops (party suppliers, for example) will stock them year-round, but most places only stock them in the weeks before November 5th and New Year.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:13 pm UTC

How much does alcohol cost at sporting events?

I was at a football game yesterday and wondered if other countries have ridiculous beer prices at sporting events.

To give you an idea, I paid $7.50 for a beer yesterday. 16 oz, and it was something terrible - Miller light or Bud light or something. You could get the same type of beer(maybe 12 oz) for $1.75 in some places when they're having specials. Similarly, I paid $4.50 for a 16 oz Newcastle Friday night. Maybe a little high, but pretty normal pice.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby tms » Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:54 pm UTC

Obviously the frequent washers don't use any water-repellent clothes. I wash trousers when there's space left in the washer.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby PhoenixEnigma » Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:06 pm UTC

emceng wrote:How much does alcohol cost at sporting events?

I was at a football game yesterday and wondered if other countries have ridiculous beer prices at sporting events.

To give you an idea, I paid $7.50 for a beer yesterday. 16 oz, and it was something terrible - Miller light or Bud light or something. You could get the same type of beer(maybe 12 oz) for $1.75 in some places when they're having specials. Similarly, I paid $4.50 for a 16 oz Newcastle Friday night. Maybe a little high, but pretty normal pice.

I don't go to a lot of sporting events, nor do I drink a lot of beer, and the two cross even less, but $7.50 doesn't sound unreasonable* from what I remember. A little high, perhaps, but not outside what I'd call normal for generic cheap beer at a sporting event.

*Well, okay, it sounds unreasonable, but not unexpected.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:13 pm UTC

emceng wrote:How much does alcohol cost at sporting events?

I was at a football game yesterday and wondered if other countries have ridiculous beer prices at sporting events.

To give you an idea, I paid $7.50 for a beer yesterday. 16 oz, and it was something terrible - Miller light or Bud light or something. You could get the same type of beer(maybe 12 oz) for $1.75 in some places when they're having specials. Similarly, I paid $4.50 for a 16 oz Newcastle Friday night. Maybe a little high, but pretty normal pice.
You're from "state of hockey," so I'm guessing somewhere in Canada? I'm guessing things like alcohol will be expensive where ever they have a captive consumer base. The last concert I went to in New York State I paid something like 6 or 7 dollars for a 12 oz can of Molsons. One of the bars at JFK Airport charges 12.50 for a rum and coke made with Cap'n.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby JBJ » Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:42 pm UTC

At a sporting event you're also dealing with a (somewhat) captive audience. I would pretty much expect the cost of a stadium beer, especially for a pro-level team, to be around $7. If it were a semi-pro or collegiate game, I'd be surprised to see it more than around $4. $5 tops. Unless it's a very well known school with hard to get tickets.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:45 pm UTC

Yeah, I mean I expect to pay outrageous prices for shitty beer at sporting events. I am looking for non-USAians perspectives. So from this board that mostly means former and current Crown controlled countries.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Wed Oct 10, 2012 9:22 am UTC

I don't go to sports events, but here in larger concerts beer tends to be more expensive than in smaller ones.

I think it may go up to 5 € for 0.25 L of (normally) cheap beer.

The same beer would typically be served for ~2.50 € in a bar.

Smaller concerts (like, say, less than 1000 people) typically do similar prices to bars, you just don't get to choose the kind of beer.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby setzer777 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 5:47 pm UTC

Question for anyone multilingual:

Do specific tones of voice convey the same emotions in different languages?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby tms » Wed Oct 10, 2012 9:05 pm UTC

Maybe.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Thu Oct 11, 2012 1:15 am UTC

emceng wrote:How much does alcohol cost at sporting events?

I was at a football game yesterday and wondered if other countries have ridiculous beer prices at sporting events.

Beer is very cheap at sporting events in Korea - I think some events/venues actually give it away free. Places generally allow you to bring your own food/drink in from outside too, so you can just buy beers at a mart for a dollar or two each.

The one major concert (Linkin Park) I went to here, however, didn't allow alcohol in the venue. I don't know if that's usual, but I think it's not uncommon. Festivals have plentiful cheap booze.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Thu Oct 11, 2012 3:17 am UTC

setzer777 wrote:Question for anyone multilingual:

Do specific tones of voice convey the same emotions in different languages?

Not in tonal languages, at least.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby yurell » Thu Oct 11, 2012 3:31 am UTC

That also makes me wonder: in Australia, when a question is asked, the pitch of the final syllable rises. Is that universal in English, or is it regional?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Thu Oct 11, 2012 3:53 am UTC

yurell wrote:That also makes me wonder: in Australia, when a question is asked, the pitch of the final syllable rises. Is that universal in English, or is it regional?

I'm pretty sure it's quite common across English and other languages, but not so common is the Australian (and particularly Queenslander) tendency to raise the pitch and the end of every sentence? Which makes everything sound like a question? And which is hard to denote in written text without adding random question marks?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Thu Oct 11, 2012 3:56 am UTC

Standard English has a rising tone at the end of a question, unless (I think) it's rhetorical or serves a different purpose than ordinary inquiry:

"Did you go to the concert?" -- Rises at the end, or might do a down-then-up flippy thing (*or might be up-then-down if you have a "what ho, old chap" accent)
"Who goes to concerts anymore?" -- Falls at the end
"You went to the concert, didn't you?" -- Falls at the end if it's an accusation, rises if it's an actual question seeking confirmation

(Questions in standard French usually fall at the end if the contain a "question word" -- who/what/where etc -- and rise otherwise, I think. That's the only other language I know (almost) well enough to answer for.)


Edit for ninja: statements rising at the end have also been spotted in various parts of North America. It's sometimes associated with teenage girls being annoying, but it's certainly not exclusive to that.

* Another edit, this one for Adacore. :wink:
Last edited by poxic on Thu Oct 11, 2012 4:45 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Thu Oct 11, 2012 4:42 am UTC

Hmm. In my (British) accent, I think at least the first of those ('Did you go to the concert?') would be high-low on the final word, like 'con[high]-cert[low]?'. I think I do that with the final word in any question - raise the pitch of/up to the start of the final word, but drop it for the very end of the sentence.

In Korean (which is not tonal), I know raising pitch at the end of a sentence is indicative of a question.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Mindworm » Thu Oct 11, 2012 12:08 pm UTC

Ditto for German. This seems to be independent of the accentuated syllables.

I also have a new question: How is the "Wolfskin" in "Jack Wolfskin" parsed? Wolf skin or wolf's kin? Both seem vaguely meaningful, with the skin being marginally more likely as it emphasizes clothing. Google has been most unhelpful on this. It seems that most people prefer consumerism over linguistic clarifications.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby tms » Thu Oct 11, 2012 1:42 pm UTC

The words 'wolfskin', 'wolf-skin' and 'wolf skin' all mean the same thing. The genitive is always spelled 'wolf's kin' and your implied meaning would be 'wolfkin' as a compound.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Mindworm » Thu Oct 11, 2012 2:21 pm UTC

Oh, I wasn't aware that English had rules for compound nouns. I just assumed that it was put into a compound for naming purposes :oops: .
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Thu Oct 11, 2012 10:00 pm UTC

But as a name, it could potentially be "Wolf's Kin", particularly if it came from translating from another, probably Nordic, language.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Mindworm » Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:57 pm UTC

Turns out there are rules and my English teachers just never bothered mentioning them. Probably because the answer to a German asking: "Can I put this into a compound noun?" is almost always no. At least not without a hyphen or blank space, and that's not what they wanted to do.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Menacing Spike » Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:28 am UTC

Today I am going to write a guide to french insults. Should you decide to visit our beautiful, raw, untamed lands, you may oftentimes find yourself assaulted by a baguette wielding bereted maniac; in that case, you could taunt him so:

"Mon gros poulet": you huge chicken. You are insulting your assaulter's virility and manliness. A frenchman cannot resist this provocation.

"Mon petit pigeon en sucre": little pigeon made of sugar. You are questioning his propension to be taken advantage of (pigeon is slang for a target for various schemes), as well as implying he is to be profited from (as in a "sugar daddy").

"Mon poulet adoré": my chicken to be roasted. You imply you are going to eat him; it's not going to be a fight, but a repas. Lick your lips.

"Ma petite colombe": a dove is the symbol of peace, and "petite" means "small". You are calling him a weak coward.

"Tu es le soleil de ma vie": You are calling him a sun. This may seem majestic, but is actually an unfathomable insult: you are comparing him to "le roi soleil", Louis XIV, whom frenchmen still hold in incommensurable contempt. His descendant XVI was slain by the Sans-Culottes ("without panties"); should you be female, you may consider not wearing any as a sign of courage and honor.

"Mon chéri": You want to decapitate him. "Cherroir" is an Old French term for "to fall". You are implying his head already fell. Try to sound like Kenshiro from the Fist of the North Star (well liked here, as the "fight to the death in a desolate wasteland" aspect strikes a close chord with us). Hum "Ken! Contre les fous les bandits!". Strike a pose.

"Très cher": very costly. Meaning he offended you, and it is going to fucking cost him.

"Ravi de vous recontrer": Raped by encountering you. Meaning he offends your senses to a very high degree.

"Comment va?": directly translates as "how going". As in, "how are you still going, you pitiful wreck of a man?!".

Remember to bat your eyelashes at him while you do so! Frenchemen actually have this weird physiology quirk whereas we process individual images better than sequences (this is why french comic are vastly better than french films). By batting your eyes, you make it seem as if you are taking a more accurate view of him, scanning around looking for a weak spot.

Smacking your lips with a "mwooah" sound mimics you sucking the marrow out of the bones of his carcass later on, a tradition in the remote and barbarous campagnes.

Keeping smiling and maintain close eye contact - you must display dominance, control, and very large teeth. Try shaking hands - this is how the french exchange battle pheromones. Sometimes you will notice especially vicious french (almost always frenchwomen) going a step further and doing this by one to three kisses on the cheek. Take no part in this. This is the rite for a battle to the death. Those kisses are called bises, which also means "light wind": in this case, the light wind of your last breath. If a frenchwoman goes for your cheek, swiftly back away and refuse the challenge.

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Dr. Diaphanous
Posts: 252
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 9:38 pm UTC
Location: UK

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Dr. Diaphanous » Sat Oct 20, 2012 10:32 am UTC

Menacing Spike wrote:Sometimes you will notice especially vicious french (almost always frenchwomen) going a step further and doing this by one to three kisses on the cheek. Take no part in this. This is the rite for a battle to the death. Those kisses are called bises, which also means "light wind": in this case, the light wind of your last breath. If a frenchwoman goes for your cheek, swiftly back away and refuse the challenge.


I heard that this is related to the kiss that Judas Iscariot gave to Jesus, condemning him to death.
"God works in mysterious and breathtakingly cruel ways."

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Carlington
Posts: 1588
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:46 am UTC
Location: Sydney, Australia.

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Carlington » Sat Oct 20, 2012 12:33 pm UTC

Menacing Spike wrote:Today I am going to write a guide to french insults. Should you decide to visit our beautiful, raw, untamed lands, you may oftentimes find yourself assaulted by a baguette wielding bereted maniac; in that case, you could taunt him so:

"Mon gros poulet": you huge chicken. You are insulting your assaulter's virility and manliness. A frenchman cannot resist this provocation.

"Mon petit pigeon en sucre": little pigeon made of sugar. You are questioning his propension to be taken advantage of (pigeon is slang for a target for various schemes), as well as implying he is to be profited from (as in a "sugar daddy").

"Mon poulet adoré": my chicken to be roasted. You imply you are going to eat him; it's not going to be a fight, but a repas. Lick your lips.

"Ma petite colombe": a dove is the symbol of peace, and "petite" means "small". You are calling him a weak coward.

"Tu es le soleil de ma vie": You are calling him a sun. This may seem majestic, but is actually an unfathomable insult: you are comparing him to "le roi soleil", Louis XIV, whom frenchmen still hold in incommensurable contempt. His descendant XVI was slain by the Sans-Culottes ("without panties"); should you be female, you may consider not wearing any as a sign of courage and honor.

"Mon chéri": You want to decapitate him. "Cherroir" is an Old French term for "to fall". You are implying his head already fell. Try to sound like Kenshiro from the Fist of the North Star (well liked here, as the "fight to the death in a desolate wasteland" aspect strikes a close chord with us). Hum "Ken! Contre les fous les bandits!". Strike a pose.

"Très cher": very costly. Meaning he offended you, and it is going to fucking cost him.

"Ravi de vous recontrer": Raped by encountering you. Meaning he offends your senses to a very high degree.

"Comment va?": directly translates as "how going". As in, "how are you still going, you pitiful wreck of a man?!".

Remember to bat your eyelashes at him while you do so! Frenchemen actually have this weird physiology quirk whereas we process individual images better than sequences (this is why french comic are vastly better than french films). By batting your eyes, you make it seem as if you are taking a more accurate view of him, scanning around looking for a weak spot.

Smacking your lips with a "mwooah" sound mimics you sucking the marrow out of the bones of his carcass later on, a tradition in the remote and barbarous campagnes.

Keeping smiling and maintain close eye contact - you must display dominance, control, and very large teeth. Try shaking hands - this is how the french exchange battle pheromones. Sometimes you will notice especially vicious french (almost always frenchwomen) going a step further and doing this by one to three kisses on the cheek. Take no part in this. This is the rite for a battle to the death. Those kisses are called bises, which also means "light wind": in this case, the light wind of your last breath. If a frenchwoman goes for your cheek, swiftly back away and refuse the challenge.


Either this is brilliant satire, or there are actually two countries called France, and I was in the wrong one.
Kewangji: Posdy zwei tosdy osdy oady. Bork bork bork, hoppity syphilis bork.

Eebster the Great: What specifically is moving faster than light in these examples?
doogly: Hands waving furiously.

Please use he/him/his pronouns when referring to me.


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