Childhood misconceptions

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby kapojinha » Sat Jun 20, 2009 8:10 am UTC

Kyberely wrote:A friend told me that she thought her dad could fix anything. She used to break things just so her dad would fix them for her and one day she pulled all the legs off a spider and said "daddy fix it".


That is.. quite disturbing. :shock:
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Aleri » Sat Jun 20, 2009 8:31 am UTC

I didn't discover that I had a vagina until I read about it in a book (circa age 11). "This is silly, there is no hole down there! . . . wtf?! when did I get that?!" And like a lot of girls I didn't figure out what a clit was until about 16 >_<

I've got female friends in their 20s who still don't know what a clit is . . .

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Shpow » Sat Jun 20, 2009 1:42 pm UTC

Aleri wrote:I didn't discover that I had a vagina until I read about it in a book (circa age 11). "This is silly, there is no hole down there! . . . wtf?! when did I get that?!" And like a lot of girls I didn't figure out what a clit was until about 16 >_<

I've got female friends in their 20s who still don't know what a clit is . . .


WHAT?!

Leave it to me to discover each part of the male and female anatomy when I was but 13 ;_;
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Clumpy » Sat Jun 20, 2009 5:59 pm UTC

Shpow wrote:
Aleri wrote:I didn't discover that I had a vagina until I read about it in a book (circa age 11). "This is silly, there is no hole down there! . . . wtf?! when did I get that?!" And like a lot of girls I didn't figure out what a clit was until about 16 >_<

I've got female friends in their 20s who still don't know what a clit is . . .


WHAT?!

Leave it to me to discover each part of the male and female anatomy when I was but 13 ;_;


Hey, I learned about female anatomy from filthy 11-year-olds on camping trips, the way God intended. So I naturally assumed the vagina was about belly-button high and similarly proportioned, and that women peed through their butts.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Ralith The Third » Sat Jun 20, 2009 6:21 pm UTC

BlueNowhere wrote:
thecommabandit wrote:I also remember siting down one day and working out that I could never be older than my brother, since the basic principle of the mechanic of getting older meant that he got one year older every time I did. I was very disappointed.

Haha, that's awesome.

Hammer wrote:I thought that if someone said something, it must be true.

I've believed this for the longest time. When I was younger I was really naive and I never thought that someone would lie to me. I wasn't about to lie to them, so why would they lie to me? Then again I did lie to my parents and other kids but it made sense when and why I was doing it. I just didn't put two and two together to realize that other people might be lying to me as well. This actually lasted well into my teen years, I'd say.

I don't remember thinking people didn't lie. I'm very.. paranoid when it comes to that stuff.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby mastered » Sat Jun 20, 2009 7:07 pm UTC

When I learned about tornadoes and mushroom clouds, I used to be totally paranoid about them and scrutinize the clouds whenever we left the house, seeing dangerous shapes everywhere.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Voco » Sat Jun 20, 2009 11:34 pm UTC

mastered wrote:When I learned about tornadoes and mushroom clouds, I used to be totally paranoid about them and scrutinize the clouds whenever we left the house, seeing dangerous shapes everywhere.


Me too! And jet contrails that appeared to rise vertically out of the horizon were either benign space shuttle launches or the opening moves of global thermonuclear war. And that time the skies were orangish, the monthly emergency alert test was happening AND there were vertical jet contrails? The entire third grade was in a state of full-blown panic.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Walter.Horvath » Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:59 am UTC

The concept of multiple user accounts on my Win98 machine was well beyond me. The only account we had was named after my dad, and I thought that pressing 'Log off 'Dad'' would kill him.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby sparks » Sun Jun 21, 2009 1:37 am UTC

MFHodge wrote:I thought that blankets somehow generated heat. I would try putting something under a blanket on the floor and I couldn't understand why it didn't get warm.

Aha, I actually incredibly only put two and two together and realized the mechanics of blankets when I was well into adolescence. Until then, I didn't think about it, and as a child I actively thought this.
Other things:
1. I also believed the spitting on stuff to polish it.
2. That there were crocodiles in the sewers. Now, I lived in an incredibly small town where it was unlikely that there actually were crocodiles there.
3. That any eggs laid by chickens had a chick inside -- I only realized it was otherwise when I was about 12.
4. That people had to be married to have children or otherwise live together and share their lifetime, because every other adult I knew was married, and those who weren't didn't live with anyone.
5. Leonardo diCaprio would one day meet me, realize how amazing I was and proceed to date me.
6. That seasons varied on continents, not hemispheres. I once asked my teacher if it was winter in the States (I live in Europe).
7. That Harry Potter was 100% true facts.
8. That clouds were a bit like cotton, and you could actually touch them.
9. That people could actually touch clouds and feel how cottony they were if they just stuck their hands into them, by rolling down the airplane windows.
10. Coffee was some sort of magical thing (I still sort of think this, though).
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Hefty One » Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:50 am UTC

bbctol wrote:When you turn eighteen, you get a secret book on how to be an adult. It's really long, but it tells you how to get married and everything about raising children. Then you take a secret oath not to tell anyone about the book till they're old enough.


You didn't get yours?

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Gaydar2000SE » Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:01 am UTC

Rippy wrote:When I was a kid, I thought garbage day was the same day of the week for everyone, and never really wondered why or why not. I also thought that "dutch" and "holland" were not related, presumably thinking there was a Dutchland. Oh yeah, and for a while I didn't have any idea sex involved thrusting: I figured the penis was inserted, and then it just stayed in there until the business was done.
It isn't related really. Holland's just two provinces in the Netherlands, North Holland and South Holland to be precise. 'Dutch' just used to mean 'German' but those strange English people with no sense of geography turned it around about 200 years back and then just used 'German' for the vacuum it created, 'German' used to mean Dutch, English, German, Norwegian, Icelandic, Frisian, Gutnish et cetera together, now that's called 'Germanic', Dutch people still call German 'Duits', Germans call themselves 'Deutsch'. And indeed, their country Deutschland.

Also, I used to think that adults were really really really smart, then I found out that that is just a myth they propagate to their children to ensure their control, I have learned from them and shall do the same when it becomes socially normal under children to have sex when you are 8 years old at broad daylight in the park and I'm the rusted old man that doesn't approve.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby OBrien » Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:20 pm UTC

Frank Zappa is a Heavy Metal musician and I will never like him.

To be fair on me, I never actually listened to any Zappa until I was 17.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby kapojinha » Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:32 pm UTC

sparks wrote:7. That Harry Potter was 100% true facts.
8. That clouds were a bit like cotton, and you could actually touch them.


I was so sad when, on my 11th birthday, I didn't get my letter from Hogwarts.
And I got that clouds thing from Peter Pan. I used to think you could bounce on them.
Which reminds me of a misconception.
I was convinced my shadow had a mind of her own, like Peter Pan's did.
I used to always check to make sure she was behaving. :lol:
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Sorroth » Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:16 pm UTC

This one's not so much a misconception, but when I was small, everyone told me that Gravity pulled things down, and were unable to give a satisfactory answer when I asked them why the Penguins didn't fall off the South Pole. I think that one was finally answered when I watched Disney's Sword in the Stone (which became one of my favourite childhood movies). Even though it gave a Newtonian explanation of it (bodies pulling bodies, as opposed to bodies distorting space), it still cleared up a problem that had plagued me for ages.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby sparks » Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:27 pm UTC

kapojinha wrote:
sparks wrote:7. That Harry Potter was 100% true facts.
8. That clouds were a bit like cotton, and you could actually touch them.


I was so sad when, on my 11th birthday, I didn't get my letter from Hogwarts.
And I got that clouds thing from Peter Pan. I used to think you could bounce on them.
Which reminds me of a misconception.
I was convinced my shadow had a mind of her own, like Peter Pan's did.
I used to always check to make sure she was behaving. :¡This cheese is burning me!:


Ahahha me too! I also used to try and turn around super quick to "catch" my shadow being in a different position from me, but she always moved.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby kapojinha » Mon Jun 22, 2009 12:00 am UTC

:mrgreen:

Another misconception: I used to think that when I left the room, all of my dolls and toys would come to life, like in Toy Story. So I was always super nice to them (i.e. reading them bedtime stories, leaving them treats, etc.), because I didn't want to upset them, and have them go all Chucky on my ass.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby lulzfish » Mon Jun 22, 2009 12:28 am UTC

This one was a lot of fun once I figured it out.

My parents have always had this souvenir magnet on our refrigerator (red outline added for clarity):
Spoiler:
Moose.JPG
Clearly a moose walking to the RIGHT over some rocks
Moose.JPG (37.34 KiB) Viewed 4434 times

It's a moose walking around, right?
WRONG!
It's actually:
Spoiler:
Head.JPG
A hellish skull-beast walking LEFT over some rocks
Head.JPG (37.95 KiB) Viewed 4430 times

Not quite nightmarish, since I knew it was a cartoon, but it was still a fairly disturbing thought.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Homo Electromagneticus » Mon Jun 22, 2009 1:19 am UTC

Walter.Horvath wrote:The concept of multiple user accounts on my Win98 machine was well beyond me. The only account we had was named after my dad, and I thought that pressing 'Log off 'Dad'' would kill him.

This makes me smile.

When I was but a wee lad, my mother would often take me with her to go to town and run errands. What would confound me for years was the turn signal display on the car's dashboard. "How does the car know which way we're going?" I would ponder...
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby The Scyphozoa » Wed Jun 24, 2009 12:51 am UTC

Homo Electromagneticus wrote:When I was but a wee lad, my mother would often take me with her to go to town and run errands. What would confound me for years was the turn signal display on the car's dashboard. "How does the car know which way we're going?" I would ponder...

It made perfect sense to me that the car would detect which way the steering wheel was turning and turn on the signal. I guess I thought that it responded to the smallest turns and that my mom turned the wheel perfectly.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby AJR » Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:18 pm UTC

For quite a while, I thought that the glass bowls in our kitchen were called "pirate's bowls", and always wanted to have my breakfast cereal in one of them.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby SecondTalon » Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:23 pm UTC

sparks wrote:9. That people could actually touch clouds and feel how cottony they were if they just stuck their hands into them, by rolling down the airplane windows.
Having been fortunate enough to do that...

They feel like fog. For the record.
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bbctol wrote:When you turn eighteen, you get a secret book on how to be an adult. It's really long, but it tells you how to get married and everything about raising children. Then you take a secret oath not to tell anyone about the book till they're old enough.
You didn't get yours?
I KNEW IT!
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby there is no zero » Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:30 am UTC

I thought that the largest number was infinity, and the next-largest number was 999 thousand nine hundred and* ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine trillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine quadrillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine trillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine zillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine trillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine quadrillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine trillion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine billion, 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine million 999 thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine.

That's 999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,
999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,
999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999, or 10^192-1. Wow. I tended to lose track if I tried to actually say this number.

I used to hear other kids say "killion" and be annoyed at them because there was no such number, while of course there was such thing as a zillion. (Hey, my spellcheck agrees!)
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Gentlelady » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:32 am UTC

1. When I was a kid there used to be a pasture across from our house. And I thought every hole in the ground was full of rattle snakes that would bite me if I didn't run really fast across it. I also believed that if I ever came across a snake, it could taste my fear and it would chase me until I got home and stood on something.

2. The kid I grew up with was the one who secretly did the pikachu voice for the cartoon.

3. That if I picked the petals off the rose bushes in the back yard, they would grow back in a week. My mother still hasn't figured out if was me who pulled the petals off the roses.

4. That the cactus that grew behind the gate in the back yard was poisonousness and if I touched it there was nothing anyone would be able to do to save me.

5. Any adult I came across would automatically know who my mother was.

6. That the town I live was inside of a huge bowl. Which was why I thought the tornado drills were unnecessary. I thought tornadoes avoided my town because it would get stuck in it forever. Later did I find out that the 'huge bowl' was a basin.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby ivnja » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:53 am UTC

It took me ages to realize that rabbits do not, in fact, lay eggs. Stupid Easter.

The thing with the turn signals confused me for a little while, too. So did the fact that the steering wheel will naturally return to the neutral position as you relax your hold on it coming out of a turn. I was convinced that my dad's Samurai could drive on its own because I watched the steering wheel turn itself.

I also completely didn't comprehend the idea that adults grow older. It kind of makes sense from a little kid's perspective, though, since a couple years brings on enormous physical changes for a child and fairly little noticeable difference for the average adult.
On the other hand, I was convinced that instead of three (living) great-grandmothers, I had two great-grandmothers and one great-great-grandmother, because I knew that the one was older than the other two
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby guyy » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:58 am UTC

there is no zero wrote:[lotsa numbers]


I did a report/presentation on Graham's Number in 5th grade.

Too bad my school didn't have any awards for Supreme Nerdosity.

Gentlelady wrote:2. The kid I grew up with was the one who secretly did the pikachu voice for the cartoon.
...
6. That the town I live was inside of a huge bowl. Which was why I thought the tornado drills were unnecessary. I thought tornadoes avoided my town because it would get stuck in it forever. Later did I find out that the 'huge bowl' was a basin.


I used to think a girl at my elementary school was a character in a kiddie nature show I watched a lot at the time. Fortunately, I was too shy to mention this absurdity.

I also thought my town was in some sort of giant bowl for some time. I have no idea where that belief came from, though, because it's easy to see there are mountains along only 2 of the 4 sides...

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Waldo » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:38 am UTC

hmmm...

When I was really young, I was convinced that cars could drive themselves. I was always nervous when my mother would step out of the car for a moment to lock the house door or whatever; I was afraid the car might start driving, and I wouldn't know how to tell it to our destination. I tried to memorize the route to school, just in case.

Later, me and my friends were convinced that jumping cactus could somehow strike from a distance. We weren't sure if the needles would shoot at you if you came within range, or if whole clumps would be launched, but we all agreed that something terrible would happen. The fact that you could brush against one and not notice until later that you had a large ball of cactus stuck in your leg only helped fuel the misconception.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby eternal luna » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:43 am UTC

I used to believe that vodka was a magical drink that only affected non-Russians.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby SlyReaper » Thu Jun 25, 2009 9:43 am UTC

I seem to remember thinking that if I walked on the cracks between paving stones, a bear would come and eat me. I think I have my child-minder to blame for that one.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Grop » Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:01 pm UTC

I could jump from unlimited height :).

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby kapojinha » Thu Jun 25, 2009 1:21 pm UTC

I used to think that planes went as fast as cars. :shock:
I haven't a clue where I got that idea.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Mactabilis » Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:02 pm UTC

I used to think places like the labyrinth and fragil rock and the imagination land in Mr rogers was real.

i remember when i got my first job at like 18, i was blown away at the thought that the people behind the counters were just average people, until then they always had some strange authority.

i too have dreams where i can jump off a hill or stairs and just lift my legs to never land, and im 27! its a lot like the way you jump in morrowind......

i also run faster if i grab the grass/earth and use my ape-ishly long arms to propel myself. ahhh dreams.....

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Adacore » Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:06 pm UTC

I had a similar revelation with world class athletes. They always look so shiny and herculean when you see them on TV, the first time I went to a sporting event live it was a bit of a shock to realise they were actually just humans. I was expecting polished man-size gods.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby SlyReaper » Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:28 pm UTC

Mactabilis wrote:i also run faster if i grab the grass/earth and use my ape-ishly long arms to propel myself. ahhh dreams.....


Ha, I KNEW I couldn't be the only one who has this sort of dream. http://echochamber.me/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7340&start=1120#p1630494

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby EnderSword » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:52 pm UTC

I used to think Electronic items actually 'Healed' themselves.

It always seemed to be the case, since if a computer or Nintendo or stereo or something stopped working, and you turned it off and came back tomorrow, it usually worked.

A friend of mine thought 'gunpoint' was a place and wondered why people went there since they got robbed a lot.

A female friend...aged 14...was shocked to discover Milk came from Cows.
When asked why she thought there was a cow on the carton she replied "I thought it was just decoration"
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby The Scyphozoa » Tue Jun 30, 2009 5:53 am UTC

guyy wrote:
there is no zero wrote:[lotsa numbers]


I did a report/presentation on Graham's Number in 5th grade.

Too bad my school didn't have any awards for Supreme Nerdosity.

Gentlelady wrote:2. The kid I grew up with was the one who secretly did the pikachu voice for the cartoon.
...
6. That the town I live was inside of a huge bowl. Which was why I thought the tornado drills were unnecessary. I thought tornadoes avoided my town because it would get stuck in it forever. Later did I find out that the 'huge bowl' was a basin.


I used to think a girl at my elementary school was a character in a kiddie nature show I watched a lot at the time. Fortunately, I was too shy to mention this absurdity.

I also thought my town was in some sort of giant bowl for some time. I have no idea where that belief came from, though, because it's easy to see there are mountains along only 2 of the 4 sides...

Weird, cuz I live in Silicon Valley in California and there are mountains on all sides and I never thought much of that. Maybe it was because I went to my grandma's house about 20 minutes away also in the valley and knew that it was big because of the long car drive, and had some sort of sense of scale.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Cytoplasm » Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:17 am UTC

Shpow wrote:
Aleri wrote:I didn't discover that I had a vagina until I read about it in a book (circa age 11). "This is silly, there is no hole down there! . . . wtf?! when did I get that?!" And like a lot of girls I didn't figure out what a clit was until about 16 >_<

I've got female friends in their 20s who still don't know what a clit is . . .


WHAT?!

Leave it to me to discover each part of the male and female anatomy when I was but 13 ;_;


I sort of discovered mine when I was five or something. I didn't really know what it was, but I did touch it a lot (nothing happened).

Let's see, when I was two or three I would stare out my bedroom window at night and I thought my heart beat was a t-rex coming down the street. I would get scared, search for it and when I couldn't find it my heart would beat faster, further scaring me.

Also, I thought that the turn signal and the clicky noise it makes meant that we were near home. I traveled to and fro quite a bit.
And, I wanted to give my little sister, Kalle (kal-ee) with middle name "Fornya" (fornia) so that her full name would be Kalle-fornia. I thought it was hilarious. I didn't really know why, but I still found it quite funny at the age of four.
¡No tengo miedo a fantasmas!

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Cytoplasm: I have catoragized some of my family into lolcats.
Felstaff: For a drudging Thursday afternoon, that level of cuteness has really made my day. Can... Can I keep you?

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Cytoplasm wrote:shannonigans

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Aetia
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Aetia » Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:36 am UTC

When I was around 4, I thought God's name was Lee. Living in the South, I heard the word "golly" a lot and thought people were saying "God Lee" instead.
I also thought I could communicate with woodpeckers by knocking on wood.
Want to speak what I've seen. Want to reach what I've dreamed. Want to be kind.

GoodRudeFun
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby GoodRudeFun » Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:43 am UTC

I always thought that different countries where like different places in time. I thought if I went to Europe or England that it would be in the medieval age, and Egypt would be just like ancient Egypt.


I thought that mountains were always in the distance, and would be there no matter where you went. They were just things in the sky that looked kinda faded and blue and sometimes had snow on the top. One day when it was really clear and we got close to one I was amazed that mountains where actual places you could go to, and that they were connected to the earth.


I used to think that "sure" meant that you were not sure. When asked if I was sure about something I would say no, because I was actually sure about it.


I thought "hamburger" and "pancake" were pronounced "ham-a-burger" and "Pan-a-cake" till I was in like third grade.
Oh. Well that's alright then.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby bonzombiekitty » Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:46 am UTC

I used to think that the phone number to my neighbor's house was "3". We had them on speed dial ever since I began using the phone, and I never actually had to call them from anywhere other than my house, except for when I missed my bus after school - my parents weren't home and I tried to call my neighbor. I had a hard time getting home.

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The Scyphozoa
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby The Scyphozoa » Thu Jul 23, 2009 5:34 am UTC

Aetia wrote:When I was around 4, I thought God's name was Lee. Living in the South, I heard the word "golly" a lot and thought people were saying "God Lee" instead.

No, God's name is God.
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