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Java Books

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:07 am UTC
by mountaingoat
I know there are some other mentions of books on Java in other threads, but I couldn't find a thread solely devoted to Java books.

I'm looking to learn some for a Java class that I'm taking next year. I would like to spend <$50.

I only have experience with HTML, CSS, and VB6.

Is Java In A Nutshell a good book for me?
The newest version was printed in 2005, making it about version 5.0, is that really a big issue?

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:27 am UTC
by shawncplus
Firstly, HTML and CSS aren't really programming languages. HTML is a markup language.

Secondly, what is your reason for learning Java? Learning a new language is a pretty big endeavor and there might be a better language for what you need.

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:44 am UTC
by mountaingoat
Haha, I know they aren't programming languages. :P
I just wanted you guys to be familiar with my background.

I need to learn Java because I'm taking a class on it next school year.
Moreso, I just want to learn it before I take the class, so I can help others/develop my knowledge more throughly, rather than just get the basics from the class.

I'm using Sun's Tutorial (http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/) right now, and I think it's pretty good? Not really sure yet, haha.

PS, is your name Shawn C?

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 12:11 pm UTC
by shawncplus
No, the cplus comes from cplusplus but that was too long so I just shortened it. A little googlage popped up this link:

Top Must-Read Java Programming Books

I haven't learned Java yet since I've focused on C++ for about 4-5 years and I've dabbled in a few other languages like VB.NET, Python, Lua, and a few others. But I definitely went the tutorial-route for about 2 years before getting any formal education and I never really bought a book.

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 1:18 pm UTC
by Hench
This is a good online book for Java. I used it a couple times as a resource to find stuff, and a prior version of this is actually what taught me GUI stuff in Java. I haven't done a lot in this 1.5 version of it, but he seems to have changed a lot of the book, sometimes not for the best. He keeps archives of the old books, so if 1.5 is too proprietary for you, the 1.4 is actually a really good one. Highly recommended.

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 7:00 pm UTC
by Devilsaur
Remember to do some of the sample assignments, questions, and programs in the book. Usually I skip these if the course has it's own assignments, but if you're learning it on your own they're definitely worth doing.

A lot of early learning is from dealing with the compiler and figuring out why it’s angry with you, (which may need some getting used to if you come from HTML/CSS design).

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:07 pm UTC
by Jach
This is the one I used for my class. And the B section, which is in the same directory. It comes with a bunch of stuff including powerpoints, textbook, a lab to do at the end of each chapter, and some AP test tips, oh and some practice tests on each subject.

Posted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 6:59 am UTC
by mountaingoat
I looked through all of them, and I like the one Jach provided best.

Right now, I'm just going through all the programs for each chapter, reading the documentation, then doing the quizzes.

I don't really need to read the textbook yet, because it's quite basic and the documentation is enough instruction, IMO. But if I don't know what something is, I read up on it there, or elsewhere.

Java books

Posted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 7:02 pm UTC
by froggie
I'd start with "Thinking in Java" (B. Eckel, available online) and then "Effective Java" by J. Bloch

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 10:11 am UTC
by taggedunion
Big Java is excellent IMO. It's what I cut my teeth on, anyway.

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 12:46 pm UTC
by zenten
I learned with On To Java, it wasn't bad.

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 6:18 pm UTC
by mountaingoat
Thanks everyone.
I think I'm going to finish up the one Jach posted (I'm on chapter 11 now), but not sure if I'll do the B content yet.
Then I'll do Thinking In Java, for another perspective.

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:08 pm UTC
by Large Trout
I'll probably get laughed at for this, but I recommend Java All-In-One Desk Reference for Dummies.

It's a huge book but it's easy going and, for a dummies book, you'll be surprised at how in-depth it gets. I've got a few "starter" books on Java which were really dry and made me want to cry out of boredom. This one doesn't. I'd get the Nutshell book too for reference (it's only Java 5 but it'll still be useful for now).

Re: Java Books

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 2:55 am UTC
by b0b
sean22190 wrote:Is Java In A Nutshell a good book for me?
The newest version was printed in 2005, making it about version 5.0, is that really a big issue?


It's the most used Java book on my bookshelf. It succinctly answers all syntax questions, and describes the parameters of the standard tool set. It also has an overview of each of the most important classes.

If you need class details that aren't included in the book, it's easy to Google them from Sun's online Javadocs.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:00 am UTC
by mountaingoat
b0b wrote:
sean22190 wrote:Is Java In A Nutshell a good book for me?
The newest version was printed in 2005, making it about version 5.0, is that really a big issue?


It's the most used Java book on my bookshelf. It succinctly answers all syntax questions, and describes the parameters of the standard tool set. It also has an overview of each of the most important classes.

If you need class details that aren't included in the book, it's easy to Google them from Sun's online Javadocs.
I'm on chapter 17 of the first book Jach posted. I think I will get Java in a nutshell once they come out with the new version. I wouldn't really use it all that much yet.

No signs on the net of it coming out anytime soon. :(

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:29 am UTC
by Misanthrope
You could also try this. It covers Java 6. I too am waiting for a new Nutshell book that covers Java 6 but it doesn't look like they're going to be doing one soon. In fact, it's been a good while since O'Reilly last published any Java new Java books.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 7:23 pm UTC
by b0b
sean22190 wrote:I think I will get Java in a nutshell once they come out with the new version. I wouldn't really use it all that much yet.

No signs on the net of it coming out anytime soon. :(

I don't think there's much in it that's version-specific. "Java in a Nutshell" contains the basic information that applies to all versions of Java. I'm still using the 3rd edition, (c)1999. I mainly use it to clarify syntax and for the baseline knowledge.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 7:37 am UTC
by mountaingoat
b0b wrote:
sean22190 wrote:I think I will get Java in a nutshell once they come out with the new version. I wouldn't really use it all that much yet.

No signs on the net of it coming out anytime soon. :(

I don't think there's much in it that's version-specific. "Java in a Nutshell" contains the basic information that applies to all versions of Java. I'm still using the 3rd edition, (c)1999. I mainly use it to clarify syntax and for the baseline knowledge.
i may get the fourth edition.

the fifth edition is $18 used, fourth is 28 cents.

Touch decision. :P

Re: Java Books

Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:20 am UTC
by Pseudo
This is the one I use in my AP Comp Science course. It's fairly detailed for what it goes through, but it mainly sticks to the parts of Java you are tested over on the AP test for students. Java 5, but you can't beat free. That is of course unless you count quality.

On another note, The site is hideous.

Re: Java books

Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 3:32 pm UTC
by bridge
+1 for
froggie wrote:I'd start with "Thinking in Java" (B. Eckel, available online)

Very good for a beginner and a nice reference for the future, lot of examples

Re: Java Books

Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:16 pm UTC
by Psuedo_Bob
So I've found a good tutorial on getting started with java, but for some reason I'm having problems finding a compiler (and the other bytecode thing, I don't remember what exactly you need) for it. Can anyone give me a link to one?

Re: Java Books

Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:27 pm UTC
by Sparv
Download the Java SDK with netbeans and use it to code and build your programs, or download the JDK and then Eclipse and do the same.

Good luck! :wink:

Re: Java Books

Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:50 pm UTC
by Psuedo_Bob
Can I get a link to that? For some reason I couldn't find any working places to download those...

Re: Java Books

Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 9:19 pm UTC
by Berengal

Re: Java Books

Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 9:22 pm UTC
by Sparv
Netbeans being an official IDE, it's on the Java website with the last JDK

Eclipse can be found by typing "Eclipse" and asking google if you are lucky

Google is your (fuck) friend ;) I would have given you the links before if I still had my bookmarks.

And these links work for sure.

EDIT: I didn't get the "you have been too slow window". Strange.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 1:38 am UTC
by Psuedo_Bob
Alright, well I got NetBeans running, and it's great. But I've heard that it's better to start out writing java with just notepad. If I wanted to do this, what else would I need?

Re: Java Books

Posted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 3:51 am UTC
by mountaingoat
Psuedo_Bob wrote:Alright, well I got NetBeans running, and it's great. But I've heard that it's better to start out writing java with just notepad. If I wanted to do this, what else would I need?

You need nothing else.
Save the program you're working on with a .java extention. Then go into the Command Prompt and type "javac" then the file (including the .java) then if it compiles correctly, execute it by typing "java" then the file (without the .java).

I probably messed up a little, but whatever.

I don't think you should use notepad + prompt. It's good to be familiar with how to do it, but it's rather tedious. Even when I wrote java with just a text editor, I wrote a script to compile and execute it.

For simple IDE's for beginners, I recommend JCreator.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 3:08 am UTC
by v1nsai
Kind of an old thread, but I'll try here before starting my own thread.

The link that hench provided is great, but it seems to be really dated (took me a few minutes to realize that "subroutines" are actually methods). Can anyone recommend another (free) online source for a broke college student to plug a few knowledge holes in Java?

Re: Java Books

Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 4:00 am UTC
by InkL0sed
sean22190 wrote:
Psuedo_Bob wrote:Alright, well I got NetBeans running, and it's great. But I've heard that it's better to start out writing java with just notepad. If I wanted to do this, what else would I need?

You need nothing else.
Save the program you're working on with a .java extention. Then go into the Command Prompt and type "javac" then the file (including the .java) then if it compiles correctly, execute it by typing "java" then the file (without the .java).

I probably messed up a little, but whatever.

I don't think you should use notepad + prompt. It's good to be familiar with how to do it, but it's rather tedious. Even when I wrote java with just a text editor, I wrote a script to compile and execute it.

For simple IDE's for beginners, I recommend JCreator.


How could compiling a java program possible be hard? You should try compiling Objective-C from the shell...

Re: Java Books

Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 3:21 pm UTC
by b.i.o
sean22190 wrote:I don't think you should use notepad + prompt. It's good to be familiar with how to do it, but it's rather tedious.

You have a strange definition of tedious. It's two commands
to compile:
javac file.java
to run:
java file

If Java's bin directory isn't in your path you're going to need to put it there for this to work. Google will find you instructions easily enough.

Also, get a good editor--don't use notepad. I recommend Notepad++ on Windows or Geany on Linux (Geany is available on Windows too, but except for Geany's built in color picker I like almost everything about NP++ better than Geany).

Re: Java Books

Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 10:50 pm UTC
by v1nsai
v1nsai wrote:Kind of an old thread, but I'll try here before starting my own thread.

The link that hench provided is great, but it seems to be really dated (took me a few minutes to realize that "subroutines" are actually methods). Can anyone recommend another (free) online source for a broke college student to plug a few knowledge holes in Java?


Anyone? :D

Re: Java Books

Posted: Thu Jun 25, 2009 9:37 am UTC
by Emu*
v1nsai wrote:
v1nsai wrote:Kind of an old thread, but I'll try here before starting my own thread.

The link that hench provided is great, but it seems to be really dated (took me a few minutes to realize that "subroutines" are actually methods). Can anyone recommend another (free) online source for a broke college student to plug a few knowledge holes in Java?


Anyone? :D


http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/

Re: Java Books

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:19 am UTC
by lorb
A friend of mine is looking for a nice java-book in french that teaches programming in java from scratch.
I'd recommend any recent edition of david ecks "Introduction to Programming Using JAVA" but it seems i am unable to check if it's available in french.
Could anyone help me here? I'd either need a place where one can get ecks book in french or a recommendation for a good java-book available in french.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 2:05 am UTC
by Anonymously Famous
I tried setting the language of my Google results to French and then searching for the book by title, thusly. It looks like the book is only in English, but some of the sites have French Java books in the "related books" part of the entry. I don't speak French, though, so I'm not even close to being able to recommend one to you. I hope the link helps, though.

Re: Java Books

Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 2:42 am UTC
by toastking
The Java for Dummies book is actually really good. You should probably learn Visual Basic before you jump into a high level language like that from HTML.