Search found 956 matches

by p1t1o
Thu Jan 27, 2011 10:41 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Muzzle energy for Sci-Fi guns.
Replies: 15
Views: 1316

Re: Muzzle energy for Sci-Fi guns.

The jacket material of most bullets is copper, this is because it is softer than the barrel material (usually steel) so that wear on the barrel is low – a fully lead is too soft and will leave deposits in the barrel. An iron or steel jacket would be inadvisable – unless in your design the bullet doe...
by p1t1o
Tue Jan 25, 2011 4:19 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Urea cycle = super lame?
Replies: 20
Views: 2055

Re: Urea cycle = super lame?

Looked like these? Yup, Im pretty sure those are them. Yup, that was pretty much my/our reaction! To make matters worse, initially my eye was drawn by their superficial resemblance to a kind of sweet around when I was a kid (it was a dark jelly coated with sugar, but in a "worm" kind of s...
by p1t1o
Tue Jan 25, 2011 3:31 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Urea cycle = super lame?
Replies: 20
Views: 2055

Re: Urea cycle = super lame?

As for the ammonium chloride salt thing - you should be ok (provided they are small amounts) in ingesting ammonia as the liver would deal with it before it ends up in the rest of the body - in fact the intestines send ammonia to the liver to deal with all of the time. You would be able to make it i...
by p1t1o
Tue Jan 25, 2011 1:18 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Urea cycle = super lame?
Replies: 20
Views: 2055

Re: Urea cycle = super lame?

NB: I bought some cough medicine recently that was like a 30% ammonium chloride/ammonium carbonate solution. Sounds tasty. Instructions were to dilute it one part in two of water (did not dilute the taste), but if you replaced the water with strong ribena the it tasted very strange but a lot less o...
by p1t1o
Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:31 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Urea cycle = super lame?
Replies: 20
Views: 2055

Re: Urea cycle = super lame?

Not so simple to burn ammonia. The oxidation reaction has a very high activation energy - it doesn't ignite in air until nearly 700 degrees Celcius. A catalyst (or an enzyme I suppose) could lower this but it does add an extra level of complexity. It is possible that building/maintaining a catalytic...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 6:53 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The photoelectric effect
Replies: 16
Views: 3622

Re: The photoelectric effect

No no, it wasn't absurd, the concept weirds me out a bit is all :D
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 1:43 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0850: "World According To Americans"
Replies: 712
Views: 176439

Re: 0850: "World According To Americans"

Well... The European portion of Turkey, known as Thrace (Turkish: Trakya), encompasses 3% of the total area but is home to more than 10% of the total population. I went and checked that because I find it so utterly ridiculous that people can say that Turkey is partly in Europe like it's a significa...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 1:39 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0850: "World According To Americans"
Replies: 712
Views: 176439

Re: 0850: "World According To Americans"

[...] Scandinavia refers to the Scandinavian mountains which run between Norway and Sweden, down the centre of the Scandinavian Penninsula (the 'penis' if you look at the Europe map on a euro coin; here's a [URL] if you've never seen one). [...] And to avoid confusion; the euro coin only depicts th...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:39 am UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0850: "World According To Americans"
Replies: 712
Views: 176439

Re: 0850: "World According To Americans"

I cant believe someone mentioned...*sigh*...the Eurovision Song Contest...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:17 am UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0850: "World According To Americans"
Replies: 712
Views: 176439

Re: 0850: "World According To Americans"

I often have this problem with the term "Europe" or "European", my job entails alot of work to do with the "European Union". For example, Turkey is not in the "European Union" but is in "Europe" and this sort of thing sometimes causes confusion. But ...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:54 am UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0850: "World According To Americans"
Replies: 712
Views: 176439

Re: 0850: "World According To Americans"

superglucose wrote:I missed fewer European nations than she got states.


Anyone else see my problem here?



In other news: Its pretty easy to find a geographically ignorant person anywhere really, my ex-girlfriend (Im in the UK btw) used to think the Pacific was on land, make sense of that.
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:22 am UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0850: "World According To Americans"
Replies: 712
Views: 176439

Re: 0850: "World According To Americans"

The other one is Lichtenstein!

AwwwwwYeeeeah
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 21, 2011 9:22 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The photoelectric effect
Replies: 16
Views: 3622

Re: The photoelectric effect

Apparently also at higher energies, compton scattering and pair production become more prevalent interactions, decreasing the probability of a photoelectric effect - although these still both involve the excitation of an electron and the dissappearance of our photon. The probability of a photoelectr...
by p1t1o
Thu Jan 20, 2011 9:21 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The photoelectric effect
Replies: 16
Views: 3622

Re: The photoelectric effect

I was thinking more along the lines of nausea, but each to their own lol!
by p1t1o
Thu Jan 20, 2011 7:19 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The photoelectric effect
Replies: 16
Views: 3622

Re: The photoelectric effect

U-u-u-urrgh...talking about the "radius" of a photon makes me feel all funny....
by p1t1o
Thu Jan 20, 2011 4:42 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The photoelectric effect
Replies: 16
Views: 3622

Re: The photoelectric effect

But energy and frequency (and therefore wavelength) are directly related, they are pretty much the same thing when you are referring to a photon. As long as a photon has enough energy to bounce an electron out of its hole then a photoelectric effect is feasible, but first the photon has to interact ...
by p1t1o
Thu Jan 20, 2011 3:52 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The photoelectric effect
Replies: 16
Views: 3622

Re: The photoelectric effect

I think it has something to do with the decreasing wavelength of the photon. A photon has a high probability of absorption if the wavelength is larger than the "gap" it is trying to pass through: consider the grid in your microwave door - it has little holes in it so you can see in, but th...
by p1t1o
Wed Jan 19, 2011 9:47 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Emulsification of fats
Replies: 17
Views: 2138

Re: Emulsification of fats

Thank you Aelfyre :) it was a very, very bad one though...
by p1t1o
Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:37 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Emulsification of fats
Replies: 17
Views: 2138

Re: Emulsification of fats

Aelfyre wrote:man something is wrong with me.. everytime I open this forum I read this as "Emulsification of cats"


Why do you think they call it a Surfacatant...Surfactancat...Surcatant? uuuuurrgh...sorry...
by p1t1o
Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:51 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Emulsification of fats
Replies: 17
Views: 2138

Re: Emulsification of fats

Fats are already emulsified by the body (bile) in the gut. More emulsification does not equal less absorption. I even suggest that if emulsified to a greater extent (ie: broken into smaller droplets) lipid absorption might actually increase due to higher surface area, increasing access of various ot...
by p1t1o
Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:20 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War
Replies: 20
Views: 1962

Re: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War

Thing is, even a "stealth" aircraft at some "safe" range will return a signal to the detector, but it will be ignored by the equipment as "noise" or some other anomalous signal. One could think it is closer to camouflage than invisibility, ie: you are looking right at a...
by p1t1o
Sat Jan 15, 2011 12:43 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War
Replies: 20
Views: 1962

Re: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War

@gorcee Agreed. One interesting note: there are "bulges" just ahead of the intakes on the F35, these have the same function as large "splitter plates", obvious on aircraft such as the F4 Phantom. The bulges were designed as a clever way of reducing the "dirty" RCS of a ...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:04 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War
Replies: 20
Views: 1962

Re: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War

Yup, you're right of course - I make the distinction because the vast majority not acquainted with the concept assume that "stealth" aircraft are invisible-as-in-harry-potter-invisible to radar. However, as signal processing techniques improve and processing power increases, then more sens...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 14, 2011 5:34 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War
Replies: 20
Views: 1962

Re: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War

@gorcee Really? I was under the impression that newer "stealth" aircraft had more conventional shapes due to better computational techniques - the F-117 had very unusual geometry because designing the aircraft to be "stealthy" from more than a few angles was prohibitively difficu...
by p1t1o
Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:00 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War
Replies: 20
Views: 1962

Re: Microwaves, Stealth Aircraft and the Cold War

The "stealth" of a "stealth" aircraft has alot to do with its geometry, yes, but they also take advantage of these absorbent coatings to minimise the return of any signal reflected towards the searching radar. Sidebar: a common misconception is that "stealth" aircraft a...
by p1t1o
Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:55 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Crazy Prediction Idea
Replies: 23
Views: 3416

Re: Crazy Prediction Idea

How about thinking of it this way: The velocity of a nerve impulse is on the order of 10-100m/s. If we use optics instead, we increase the speed by a factor of around 3-30million. I hypothesise that that means we can build a mechanical brain 450000km across and still have it run at the same speed. W...
by p1t1o
Wed Dec 01, 2010 1:05 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: absolute 0
Replies: 6
Views: 1306

Re: absolute 0

It will be pretty hard to give you an "example" graph to use. Generally the contraction of an ideal gas with temperature will be largely linear, but you are extrapolating to a very large degree here, through phase changes and other things. Plus the volume will never reach "zero" ...
by p1t1o
Tue Nov 30, 2010 3:39 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Crazy Prediction Idea
Replies: 23
Views: 3416

Re: Crazy Prediction Idea

But then its not a "simulation" right? That'd be like me, who likes flight sims, buying the "ultimate flight sim" from PC world, it costs 15grand and includes vouchers for flight school, further qualification classes and assessments, a CV guide, career tips and a list of contacts...
by p1t1o
Tue Nov 30, 2010 1:14 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: i have to make it.. don't ask me why, i just do..
Replies: 80
Views: 15953

Re: i have to make it.. don't ask me why, i just do..

Possible to improve the surface quality of your brittle fulgurite by acid etching instead? Pro: can be done even with very fragile forms. Con: may not achieve the same effect as polishing. Also, doing a brief image search for fulgurites...they arn't exactly "pretty" are they...I mean its c...
by p1t1o
Tue Nov 30, 2010 12:45 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Crazy Prediction Idea
Replies: 23
Views: 3416

Re: Crazy Prediction Idea

I think I can sum up my gut reaction to this as follows: If I want to say, simulate the motion of two particles perfectly I will need a computer composed of many, many particles. It seems wrong in my head (no hard facts here) that my computer, composed of n particles cannot simulate the exact motion...
by p1t1o
Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:37 pm UTC
Forum: Fictional Science
Topic: Clarke's Third Law and Harry Potter.
Replies: 21
Views: 6679

Re: Clarke's Third Law and Harry Potter.

If you burn your hand off, you will only have one person to blame.

Thats right.

The Human Torch.

What a bastard...
by p1t1o
Thu Nov 25, 2010 9:33 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: pH of buffer, then adding acid
Replies: 9
Views: 1284

Re: pH of buffer, then adding acid

Hmmm, intersting question. My gut feeling would be that it would be a pretty fine balance, with a sigmoidal curve on the pH - ie:the pH would approach the "mid-point" only if the buffers were very closely balanced in their buffering capacity (depends on their relative Ka's and stoichiometr...
by p1t1o
Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:31 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: pH of buffer, then adding acid
Replies: 9
Views: 1284

Re: pH of buffer, then adding acid

Did you get your homework back yet? At some point a few posts ago you seem to come to the conclusion that the K for NH3 + H -> NH4 was something like 1.8e9? Dont know what is going on there. You do really need the Ka for NH4+(aq) to solve this and its 5.6e-10. Using that, I get a final pH of 9.009 w...
by p1t1o
Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:48 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Uses for steel on aircraft?
Replies: 8
Views: 2650

Re: Uses for steel on aircraft?

It is very likely that parts of the seatbelt buckles and fastenings are steel.
by p1t1o
Wed Nov 10, 2010 4:38 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: pH
Replies: 14
Views: 2152

Re: pH

“Cooking” almost by definition means a permanent chemical change, and since “organic” stuff contain very very complex chemistries, and “cooking” is a pretty vigorous treatment – then it becomes very hard to accurately predict the final chemistry. In other words, there will be so many reactions takin...

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